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Beauty means something different to everyone. An episode of Sherlock I distinctly remember had the protagonist declare while giving the Best Man’s speech at a wedding; “Beauty is a construct based entirely on childhood impressions, influences and role models.”

At the time, I was roughly 16 years old, obsessed with changing absolutely everything about my appearance. During my school days, everyone wanted to look the same.

The same tanned skin, bright blonde hair which is pretty much only natural if you are of Scandinavian descent, contoured cheekbones and slender figure with a waistline that most likely requires a corset to maintain.

Being different was not only seen as unattractive, it was even feared.

It was only when I entered college and saw beauty expanding its traits that my eyes were opened to different types of aesthetically pleasing looks. As well as this, I began to understand that confidence is beauty.

Happiness is beauty, intelligence is beauty, generosity is beauty. And that beauty is often the least interesting thing about a person.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by rupi kaur (@rupikaur_) on

However, the ideal of beauty which had been prominent during my secondary school years remained the same until the Kardashians exploded onto the reality TV scene, and over the course of the last decade have altered the idea of beauty as we know it.

With their bum and breast implants, nose jobs, cheek implants, lip fillers, whitened teeth among other procedures I don’t have the vocabulary to describe, somehow the idea of what was beautiful drastically changed.

Body modification became far more normalised, as well as the fact that social media gave audiences the power of knowledge.

While celebrities were undoubtedly changing their faces and bodies for decades, especially ones on our cinema and TV screens, social media and the internet now gave us the tools to recognise when ‘work’ had been done.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Consultant Clinic (@consultant_clinic) on

One fascinating case which has attracted massive public attention in the last few weeks is that of Elliot Joseph Rentz, otherwise known as Alexis Stone.

The make-up and drag artist garnered public furore after revealing a massively drastic surgical transformation to his large social media following, uploading reveal videos to his YouTube channel which were bombarded with negative comments spewing hateful language and even death threats.

Rentz began the process on August 1 of last year, explaining to his following in a video;

“I don’t want to look the way I look today. I don’t connect with what I see. I never have. So I’m changing it all. I’ve been called crazy. I’ve been called botched. I’ve been called an addict. I’ve been called ugly. I’m told every single day that I’ve ruined my face,” he claimed, emphasising that every last cent he owned would be given to his surgical dream of metamorphosis.

“You name it, I’m having it done,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Alexis uploads a video titled “The Reveal”, which has since racked up over 450,000 views. In the diary-like visual film, the drag artist shows off his brand new face, which included fat grafts to his nose, forehead, and chin, as well as chin and cheek implants and an eye lift.

“This had nothing to do with vanity and everything to do with sanity,” he quotes, directly from Pete Burns’ biography.

One month later, Rentz uploads a compilation of comments, each more vicious and negative than the next. Some of them are hard to read.

Stone later claimed his so-called friends and family members often joined in on the vitriolic, with some people even telling him to take his own life, and that his ex-boyfriend committed suicide because of Stone.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Roll on January 1 2019, and Stone reveals in a lengthy YouTube documentary that the whole six-month journey was a complete hoax – his new ‘botched’ face was a complex mask.

Working with Academy Award-winning makeup artist David Marti, a stunt mask was even developed from prosthetic facial materials to be worn outside of the house. Months of effort and secrecy had led to this, and the result was fascinating.

He referred to the stunt as a social experiment, while others called it a cry for mental health help, an attention seeking performance or even a show of disrespect for those who have undergone extreme surgery themselves for whatever reason.

So why did he do it, and what did his social experiment show about society’s idea of beautiful versus ‘botched’ surgery?

Ireland’s perception of the cosmetic surgery industry is vastly different from the reality.

Dozens of clinics have popped up all over the country – Westport in County Mayo is even the predominant creator and exporter of the world’s botox – and yet there is an element of hushed secrecy to the entire organisation.

It is rare to find an Irish person who opens up about having plastic surgery, we are a country of people who lament so-called ‘narcissism’, yet self-confidence issues remain potent within our society.

In a society that profits from self-doubt, liking yourself is an act of rebellion.

Jameela Jamil has frequently found herself in the public eye for her scathing indictment of the Kardashian family, arguing that their world is one which 'recycles self-hatred'.

Yet the reality TV clan have essentially transformed the perception of beauty over the last decade, morphing women into self-obsession with curves, plumped up lips, tanned skin and bodycon clothing.

“You’re selling us self-consciousness,” she claims, portraying her deep disappointment of the ‘double-agents to the patriarchy’. Her main issue with the Kardashians is their weight-loss product endorsements, which are basically a fancier packaging for laxatives in protein shake form.

The family have abundant riches which can afford the best photoshop, photographers, airbrushing, personal trainers, stylists, dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons the world can offer.

Even a glance over websites aimed at young women such as Boohoo, Missguided and PrettyLittleThing shows the huge changes in the beauty industry.

Their models have hyper-miniscule waists and voluptuous curves, glossy brunette locks, tanned skin and full lips, highly reminiscent of the Kardashian family’s idea of what beauty means.

The #10YearChallenge has proven at least one thing; those who have money have a greater control over their appearance than those who don’t.

Body modification has become normalised in society, whether it’s permanent or semi-permanent. Contouring, filters on our social media apps, airbrushing, make-up tutorials on YouTube and cosmetic surgery all reflect the culture we live in, which constantly tells us what we look like isn’t enough.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Muriam Waseem (@muriamwasi) on

And yet, if a person who changes their appearance is genuinely happier and finds improvement in their mental health and self-esteem as a result of body modification, who are we to judge their lifestyle choices?

Choice is the vital word here. Our society and law consistently shows that it believes it possesses the right to control other people’s bodies. Specifically female bodies.

If another person has the funds and is of sound mind, shouldn’t they be allowed to alter their body if it sparks joy in them, to reference the iconic Marie Kondo?

What struck me most was the understanding which the public has for those undergoing body modification for the sake of their physical health.

Whether it’s a nose job for aiding breathing, a breast reduction surgery to alleviate back pain or even just braces, the level of support appears to be significantly higher when physical health is taken into account, rather than perceived vanity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by River Medical (@rivermedical) on

Yet if a person’s mental health is suffering as a result of their appearance, is this not still a health reason? On an ‘extreme’ level, is transitioning from a male or female gender to the opposite biological sex classified as body modification?

In this case, a person’s mental health would presumably suffer as a result of their appearance, should they not identify with who they see in the mirror.

Cases of body dysmorphia are higher than ever in Ireland, obsession with one’s flaws can cause great emotional pain. Yet we fixate on the reasoning for a person’s body modification, we presume we have the right to judge them for their choices.

SHEmazing spoke to a young woman named Gráinne, who underwent breast reduction surgery at the age of 19, and never looked back. She was plagued with back pain throughout her secondary school years, but the daily toll which her chest took on her confidence and mental health was the final straw;

“For my own personal experience I would say, I think my chest came in in like first year when I was 13, and got bigger after that. I’d say it probably crossed my mind, a chest reduction every once in a while. You’d be trying on clothes and things just wouldn’t fit, whether it was bikini or swimsuits or whatever, I couldn’t buy clothes that fit. You’d be thinking, ‘just chop them off and be done with it’.”

“Throughout secondary school if you had that idea, you’d just dismiss it, because we don’t do that. I didn’t take it seriously, it was a passing thought. It was first year of college that my cousin, who had a bigger chest than I did, got a breast reduction surgery done. I thought, ‘If she could do it, why can’t I?’ It dispelled the taboo a bit, I guess.”

Gráinne noticed the unspoken way which Irish people often have of burying a topic until somebody else is brave enough to unlock it.

“I hadn’t really thought about it, but that took away the wall up around it. The summer before I started second year in college, it was just getting to me. It affected everything in the way of confidence, everything I wore, playing sports just wasn’t a thing, I just felt vulnerable. My mum always compared it to wild games of tennis at Wimbledon, everything’s going the wrong direction. You’re very self-conscious about it. I was starting to get dints in my shoulders, I would have been 19 at the time so I couldn’t believe I could get them so young”

Gráinne discovered that she qualified for the surgery through the state on medical grounds, and her life greatly changed after that pivotal moment;

“I got my chest done September of 2015, so I would have been 19 when I started. I went to my GP about it, and he referred us. It was on medical grounds, I couldn’t straighten my back or stand for five minutes without a pain in my back because it just couldn’t hold my breasts. You feel like a hunchback all the time because you’re always bending over. I remember when I was going to the consultant, I was more nervous because I thought ‘If he tells me I can’t get this surgery, what am I going to do?’"

"I went in and found out I could have it on health grounds, and I was the right BMI for them to justify it. We had to wait for the insurance to approve it. The only funny thing was that they told me there would be scars. I never cared about this, I knew I could deal with them if it meant that I could have a smaller chest. To this day, I don’t care about the scars. They’re there, they’re fine, they’re healed.”

The process of the surgery itself is a journey, from the initial thought pattern, to the planning, to the operation itself and then recovery. Nobody takes on cosmetic surgery lightly, nobody does it on a whim or doesn’t think it through. They don’t think about ‘ruining’ their looks, or what other people think.

They have been on their journey for a long time, they are of sound mind, and they have ultimately made a choice and will handle whatever consequences arrive afterwards;

“Having the surgery itself, people would ask me if I was nervous. I kept telling people, ‘Why would I be nervous, I just have to lie there? It’s the doctor’s job.’ I wasn’t nervous, I was excited about it because it meant that so many other things were going to be open to me. When I finally got the surgery done, I was just ready for it. After the surgery, you had to have a week of bedrest to recover, and take care of yourself. It was fine, I had protein and scrambled eggs because the nurses said that it would help the healing of scars. I never put any kind of stress on it, I was always just excited about the chance to have it done. I can’t imagine what my life would be like without having it done, if I was still in the mental headspace of constantly being conscious of my chest like that.”

What changed in Gráinne’s life after her operation, and how does she feel today about it?

“It was just such a thing that you hid before. Everyone in my family had adapted to wearing big jumpers and scarves to hide it, we were a big chested family. I have no problem talking about my surgery, I have no problem talking about my chest size. I was never vulnerable about it, I kind of own it. Every year around the anniversary of my surgery, I think of it like a little victory. It’s an attitude, it’s another year on of not having to deal with my chest. People who knew me and knew how important it was for me were supportive."

"I wonder if there was someone who wanted implants for their chest, would it have been the same reaction? My flat chested friends always joked ‘I’ll use whatever you don’t want!’, I wonder if someone had gotten implants, would it have been the same reaction? Would people have been as supportive? Even if it was for their own mental health because they can’t stand being so flat-chested, I don’t think it would be as accepted.”

I asked Gráinne how her life changed after the surgery, in more than just a physical way;

“It definitely improved my mental health and the way I see myself. It’s made me more accepting of other parts of my body, of me as a whole. My physical health has also improved, I’m more active. I used to do so many after-school activities in primary school, but once my chest developed I stopped those. Sports bras didn’t improve it either. No one in my life ever commented on me having a big chest in a negative way to me, I don’t think. It was just something I wanted.”

Ariel Winter chose to have a breast reduction surgery following years of public and online ridicule, complications involving acting roles as well as intense back pain. Speaking about the difficulties to Glamour in 2015, she said;

“We live in a day and age where everything you do is ridiculed. The Internet bullies are awful. I could post a photo where I feel good, and 500 people will comment about how fat I am and that I am disgusting. On red carpets, I just said to myself, "You have to do your best to look confident and stand up tall, and make yourself look as good as you can in these photos," because everyone is going to see them. I definitely seemed confident; I'm an actress, that's what we do. But on the inside, I wasn't feeling so happy.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ARIEL WINTER (@arielwinter) on

For Gráinne, Ariel Winter’s story deeply resonated with her;

 “I saw her on Ellen, and just understood everything she said. You’re so self conscious of it. It would have affected my confidence going on Erasmus, I always hid behind scarves and jumpers. I’m far more confident now, and whether that was just growing up or having my chest done, I feel the chest was a major contributing factor. I’m still a curvaceous figure, but it’s manageable and I’m not weighed down by it. It wasn’t about anyone else, it was about me and no one else. If that’s what someone else wants, then they should go for it.”

When asked her opinion on Alexis Stone’s stunt, Gráinne was struck by the thought of going ‘too far’, and why that seemed to offend so many people. The idea that if you transform yourself to look less like the culturally accepted beauty standards, you are committing a grave sin in some way;

“For the whole Alexis Stone side of things, I think the problem with that was, did he go too far in people’s eyes? He didn’t fit with what society wanted him to look like. Kylie Jenner’s lips, she was self-conscious about them, and had been over-drawing, she got them done, but now we forget that she ever got them done. We accept that this is her face. But with Alexis, everyone thinks he went too far. People getting things like that done are often afraid of other people seeing their insecurities. There’s a model of what society wants people to look like, and you’re either reaching that model or you’re going too far."

Image: youtube.com

"Rachel Green in Friends, it’s so overlooked that she got a nose job, because it was to fix what they saw as a flaw. If Alexis Stone pretended to get work done for what he saw as a flaw, but society didn’t, then it’s a problem. Other people didn’t know about my chest, but I felt that it was a burden for myself and how I viewed myself. It was literally weighing me down. Kylie Jenner’s lips were a flaw to herself, and she ‘fixed’ them and she’s happy. It’s about ‘fixing’ what people’s perception of beauty is.”

What a large group of people perceive to be aesthetically pleasing offers a mirror to that society itself. Sociological factors have a major impact on why we see certain shapes, sizes, faces, skin types, hair and eye colours etc as the desirable way to look. Despite the fact that millions of young women ache to look the same as the Kardashians, it’s what is unique to each person that is the inherently beautiful part of them.

What's 'beautiful' today may be off-brand tomorrow. Why try to keep up?

As well as their appearance, their worth is so much more than what they look like or what they way. What they feel, what they offer to the world, their identities, their language, their flaws, their intelligence, their kindness; these factors are often greatly impacted by appearance, but beauty is more to do with the mind than what the eye envisions.

“Society has an issue with it if it’s pointing out flaws that they see in themselves as well. If you see something that you really admire in someone else, you feel self-conscious about it yourself in some way.”

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Love Island is back on our screens for the next eight weeks, but there are more than a few issues which need to be addressed.

We're talking racism, we're talking homophobia, we're talking ablism, we're talking sexism, we're talking class, we're talking body diversity…the whole can of worms.

Each of these topics deserve to be tackled individually, no doubt. Bear in mind during this article that, as a Caucasian woman, I cannot speak for the experiences of other ethnicities and it's incredibly important to listen to their personal stories rather than another white woman's take on their livelihoods.

In this article, it's time to talk about the racial bias in the infamous reality television show, which sees Islanders couple up in the hopes of winning the £50,000 cash prize. Does everyone have a fair chance, though?

One tweet in particular did the rounds last night and is currently on 37,000 likes and 5.7 thousand reweets for the point it made about former contestants-of-colour.

From Malin and Marcel in series two and three, to Samira in the fourth season, and now Yewande in the latest episode: People-of-colour are always chosen last for the coupling.

These statistics are troubling when we hear how much racial abuse has been sent to Yewande Biala, the Irish candidate who works in cancer research as a scientist. 

Members of the public are literally questioning her nationality despite the fact she has an Irish accent and refers to herself as Irish, and trolls persistently send abuse her way online.

Former Love Island contestant Samira Mighty has now expressed her fear that Yewande will experience the same micro-aggressions and racism as what she was subjected to last season.

She ultimately failed to find love on the show, with the male contestants evidently not finding her attractive. She left the show after a failed coupling with Frankie Foster, but is now speaking out.

Yewande Biala (left) and Samira Mighty (right)

"I feel like there has been so many comparisons between the two of us," she told Metro.co.uk. "The only thing that is similar – it’s not even the colour of our skin – it’s that she is a shade of brown.

"I was trending on Twitter when the line-up came out because of the comparisons. I’m different from her. I’m a theatrical person and she’s a scientist. I think our personalities are different. You can even see it in the first introduction video."

23-year-old Yewande is of Nigerian descent, and has faced criticism online for her choice of men and even her preference for wearing a wig instead of a weave. The standards aren't the same for Caucasian contestants.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Yewande (@yewande_biala) on

Samira also expressed frustration about the pressure for people-of-colour in the villa to choose each other as a couple, such as Sherif and Yewande:

"If Sherif does pick her, people are going to say “Oh okay, there is a black couple” and then it’s going to be cliche. It’s just weird. Everyone chill out. It’s now 2019, we should be able to do whatever we want."

Another ex-Islander, Marcel Somerville, has bemoaned the racial bias in the show after the contestants coupled up, and Yewande was picked last.

"Love Island flashbacks," he tweeted. "Black guy, black girl and mixed race guy all left unpicked. Mad!!!" the former Blazin' Squad member wrote,

None of the female contestants stepped forward to indicate their attraction to him back in 2017 while he was in the competition.

This year, newbies Yewande Biala, Sherif Lanre and Michael Griffiths were all sidelined during the first episode, with Scottish contestant Anton Danyluk causing trouble already.

Before the start of this year's series, fans of the show asked ITV to remove Danyluk after an image of him wearing blackface makeup was discovered from six years ago.

Somerville explained the deeply offensive nature of blackface on his Instagram story, explaining that it "invokes a racist and painful history". Blackface only conceals racism, and yet ITV allowed him to stay on the show.

Last year, Samira was the first woman-of-colour to take part in the show's history, and only one man out of sixteen in the villa were interested in her. A gorgeous West End performer, who boys aren't attracted to? What?

In Samira's time in the villa, Megan Barton-Hanson (the blonde and slim contestant) was referred to as “everyone's type on paper”. It seems that Lucie Donlon, the blonde, slim surfer model, is this year's Megan.

Anton and Joe are already vying to win the heart of the 21-year-old, with Anton seeking to ditch Amy (another slim, blonde contestant) who he's been paired up with presumably very soon.

Is it just micro-aggressions, or are narrow-minded Eurocentric ideas of beauty unavoidable in this show?

From a huge lack of body diversity as well as racial, the reality show is catering for a miniscule amount of the population when it comes to representation.

It's easy to dismiss it as just car-crash tv, but millions of people watch Love Island, and seeing the same type of beauty ideal over and over again is disturbingly damaging.

Jameela Jamil opened up on Twitter about her sadness and anger at the lack of body types represented by the show, whose bosses claim it's because they want the contestants to be "attracted to one another."

Jamil and the show's host, Caroline Flack, disagreed on their stances about diversity, with news websites painting Jamil as angry and irrational.

In reality, she was just trying to express concern for under-represented body types, ethnicities, gender and abilities.

The show is undoubtedly telling us that only slim, toned, blonde, white, big-breasted women are beautiful enough to catch a man, and only tall, white men with bronzed abs are good enough to be deemed attractive for women.

Stereotypes and tropes surrounding people-of-colour are undoubtedly present, such as Jamil's experience of being the 'angry brown woman'. 

However, it's women-of-colour that appear to be experiencing the most difficulties.

Valerie Ross of Scientific American wrote about the non-verbal behaviour towards reality tv stars of different races affecting the viewers' prejudice, and her data is overwhelming.

On-screen body language towards people-of-colour can increase unconscious prejudice in viewers, according to Tufts University research.

Esteemed journalist and researcher Cheryl Thompson has also written about the portrayal of black women on reality tv, pointing out three key tropes; the 'Mammy', the 'Jezebel' and the 'Sapphire'.

Three racial stereotypes of black womanhood which came to light at various historical moments in Western media culture. 

The 'Mammy' has links with servitude and the trademark subservient, mothering figure. The 'Jezebel', born out of chattel slavery, was seen as a sexually depraved, immoral and lascivious black woman. The 'Sapphire' was born on television; angry, emasculating and loud black women. Recognise the signs?

Lack of representation on television can be seen outside of the reality genre, but the experiences of Love Islanders-of-colour speaks for itself. Everything is trying to tell them that they don't fit the ideal of beauty, just like the lack of ethnicity on runways, ad campaigns and film.

Serena Williams could never get the amount of sponsorships in fashion as her blonde, slim tennis players, who weren't even close to her talent. Naomi Campbell and Tyra Banks revolutionised modelling for black women, but experienced immense difficulties in the process. Black women still rarely get cast in lead roles in film, theatre and television.

What does this tell you about who the public want to see on their screens? Not to mention the lack of care they give towards the mental health of Islanders. The damage which a lack of body diversity and ethnicities does to viewers is undeniable, if you don't see yourself then you assume you aren't enough. You would feel invisible.

One argument I have heard for the lack of diversity is that 'token' candidates such as a plus-sized Islander or woman-of-colour, face a barrage of abuse online as they are clearly the lone representatives.

It's important to take their mental health into account, can they handle this level of online racial or body-orientated abuse? The fact that they have to choose between being represented but abused as a result or not seeing themselves on a screen at all is depressing and unfair.

Yet the less the public see of other races, genders, classes, body types and abilities, the more they will misunderstand them and hold high levels of ignorance. Ignorance leads to consequences.

Feature image: ITV

 

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Love Island has yet to return for its fifth season, but drama has already begun brewing online over body sizes and weight diversity.

Jameela Jamil has expressed her distaste about the lack of plus-size people on the hit ITV2 show, and tweeted an image of one of the contestants who she presumed was the producers choice for a larger type of body.

Unfortunately, her tweet has slightly backfired after Katy McDermott pointed out that, by posting an image and singling out one woman and assuming she is the 'token plus-size contestant', she is now the one labelling women's bodies:

The Good Place actress and activist wrote: "The producers of Love Island think this slim woman counts as their new token “plus size” contestant? Are they drunk?"

The woman, Anna Vakili, is slightly curvier than the other contestants, but is still by no means a 'plus-size' model.

Former Love Island star Kady McDermott called out Jameela for using a 2019 hopeful's body image to try and prove a point:

The 23-year-old slammed the British actress's supposed double standards after she labelled Anna's body 'slim' and assumed she was the body diversity choice this year.

She rebutted: "Who even said she was the plus size contestant? Maybe we shouldn’t be labelling women as anything and just letting them be who they are. Skinny/slim/curvy/obese who cares."

Other Twitter users agreed with Kady, saying how disappointed they were when Anna was singled out for her body compared to other contestants when it's perfectly healthy.

Kady continued to argue against Jameela's call-out, writing: "Couldn’t agree more. She is FAR from a “plus size” but even if she was she shouldn’t be pointed out likes she’s different. People are people."

Former contestants Alexandra Cane and Malin Andersson called on the show's bosses last week to cast a more diverse range of Islanders.

Fans have been quick to compare 28-year-old pharmacist Anna to queen of curses, Kim Kardashian. Love Island producers have not confirmed that Anna was added to the line-up to represent a different body type.

Many were disappointed by the absence of Jada Sezer, who was rumoured to join the show. Sezer is a mental health campaigner and plus-size model, and would have brought something new to the villa.

Feature image: Instagram/@jameelajamilofficial/@kadymcdermott

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Jameela Jamil has opened up about having an abortion when she was younger.

The Good Life actor took to social media to reveal that she underwent the procedure after falling pregnant at a young age. 

The 33-year-old said that the decision was the best one she ever made as she wasn't ready for it emotionally, psychologically or financially. 

Jameela Jamil

She wrote, ''I had an abortion when I was young, and it was the best decision I have ever made for me and, for the baby I didn’t want and wasn’t ready for emotionally, psychologically and financially. So many children will end up in foster homes.''

She continued, ''So many lives ruined. So very cruel.''

Jameela was speaking out against the new anti-abortion law, HB 481, in Georgia, America that will be coming into effect in 2020.

The law will ban abortion at ''any stage of pregnancy.''

Jameela called the law, ''upsetting, inhumane, and blatantly demonstrative of a hatred of women.''

She added, ''It is a disregard for our rights, bodies, mental health, and essentially a punishment for rape victims, forcing to carry the baby of their rapist. I’m so stunned that our world is not only behind, it’s moving backward. This hurts my heart in so many different ways, and in particular as a rape victim. I can’t imagine having fallen pregnant and being FORCED BY LAW to carry his baby to term, and see someone who looked like him every day, otherwise, I can get the death penalty?!''

Jameela Jamil

Her followers showered her with supportive comments, with one saying, ''I’ve been loudly screaming this since becoming pregnant myself – forcing a woman to carry a baby she does not want should be considered torture. I live in Canada. Abortion here is a non-issue. I’m angered for Georgia and the US.''

Others were not of the same mind, with one writing, ''Just say it was the best for you, I understand. Don't say that being aborted was the best for that baby. Your baby. It wasn't.''

This is the first time that the former model has spoken about her abortion but she pleaded with her followers to help in fighting the ban and she hopes that by talking about what she went through, it will help other women to feel less alone. 

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Jameela Jamil doesn't hold anything back when it comes to body-shaming, and abuse in the entertainment industry.

She has become renowned for her comments blasting the Kardashians for endorsing weight-loss products, and also is on a campaign attempting to ban airbrushing and photoshop.

The Good Place actress has now opened up about her feelings regarding designer Karl Lagerfeld, who passed away yesterday aged 85.

Jamil re-tweeted an article entitled Stop Mourning Oppressors: Anti-Condolences for Karl Lagerfeld by Lara Witt, expressing disdain for those who are sharing grief about the controversial designer.

"I’m glad somebody said it. Even if it is a little soon. A ruthless, fat-phobic misogynist shouldn’t be posted all over the internet as a saint gone-too-soon. Talented for sure, but not the best person," she wrote.

Chanel confirmed yesterday that the iconic German visionary had died. Lagerfeld worked as creative director of Fendi, Chanel and K by Karl Lagerfeld simultaneously until his death.

Lagerfeld was renowned globally for his acerbic wit, though some of his comments embroiled him in controversies, particularly those involving weight loss and #MeToo.

He was known for calling Adele "a little too fat", and said of Pippa Middleton; “I don’t like the sister’s face. She should only show her back.” Wow…

Of Princess Diana, he said in a 2006 interview; “She was pretty and she was sweet, but she was stupid." As if that wasn't bad enough, he then got political. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Karl Lagerfeld (@karlagerfeld) on

Two years ago on a French TV show, he blamed German Chancellor Angela Merkel for the migrant crisis and invoked the Holocaust.

The Guardian wrote that he quoted; “One cannot – even if there are decades between them – kill millions of Jews so you can bring millions of their worst enemies in their place.” Oh God…

He then targeted legendary actress Meryl Streep, claiming she had specially ordered a Chanel dress to wear to the Oscars, but changed her mind when a different designer offered her a dress. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Meryl completely disputes this, and Chanel doesn’t pay actresses to wear their fashions on the red carpet, despite the fact that many designers in the industry do.

When he was asked about Streep, he said, “A genius actress, but cheapness also, no?” Meryl responded, saying; "Karl Lagerfeld, a prominent designer, defamed me, my stylist, and the illustrious designer whose dress I chose to wear, in an important industry publication. 

"That publication printed this defamation, unchecked." Don't hold back, gal.

Lagerfeld also told a German magazine that he will only hire thin models for his runway shows because “no one wants to see curvy women”.

When asked to comment on model victims of sexual harassment, said: “If you don’t want your pants pulled about, don’t become a model! Join a nunnery." Oh Karl…

Jameela Jamil's reponse to his death has caused some social media users to claim she has a lack of respect for the dead and condemned him too quickly.

“Seriously let’s have some respect for his death keep your opinion at least respectful at this time,” wrote one person. Others showed their support for the actress;

Others claim that she dragged his name too soon, and his family are only beginning to mourn;

“Regardless if your opinion is right or wrong, a lot of people seem to have liked and respected this person. Do you think it would be more respectful to voice your opinion after hes been mourned by friends and family?” wrote another user.

Jamil responded with another, succinct tweet;

She wrote, "Gonna write an essay about this instead of trying to put my thoughts on this into a tweet. How problematic the industry has been for girls is too complex for this."

We look forward to reading this essay, as the issue is definitely a complicated one. Do you agree with Jameela, or think it was too soon?

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The Food Safety Authority of Ireland have recalled four Miss Fit Skinny tea and coffee products over 'misleading labelling'.

Miss Fit Skinny Tea 14 Day Skinny Tea, Miss Fit Skinny Tea Max, Miss Fit Slimming Coffee 14 Day Fat Burning Instant Coffee and Miss Fit Skinny Coffee Max are the products which will be recalled.

The FSAI released a statement on the matter, saying; "All batches of the above four Miss Fit products are being recalled due to incorrect, misleading and ambiguous labelling."

"Amongst the labelling breaches are health claims which are not authorised and are therefore misleading to the consumer."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Products from the brand have been asked to be removed from the market. Shops have been ordered to remove the detox products from the shelves and display point-of-sale notices to correctly inform customers.

There has been a huge amount of backlash in recent months to 'quick fix' weight loss brands such as these, with the head doctor of the NHS condemning weight-loss advertisements and Jameela Jamil fronting a campaign against them.

After rapper Cardi B endorsed the teas, which contain ingredients akin to laxatives, Jamil wrote on Twitter: "If you want to “curb your appetite” eat some damn green vegetables or have some nutritious natural vegetable soup."

"Don’t drink these “detox” teas. You need fibre! Not something that honestly just makes you have diarrhoea the day you take it and constipates you in the long run…"

They were recalled due to the misinformed labelling, and it can't be a negative thing for young women and their mental health that action is finally being taken against them.

Hazel Wallace, better known as The Food Medic, claims that;

"Some of these detoxes are really dangerous and not healthy at all, especially some of the skinny teas," said Hazel, who is a junior doctor and a certified personal trainer. and therefore has healthcare and nutrition experience.

"Although they claim they are natural many drugs are actually from nature but it doesn’t make them naturally good for you. Your liver does the detoxing for your body you don’t need a green tea to detox,’ she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Wallace also commented on senna leaves, a laxative which leads to dehydration;

"Some of these skinny teas have laxatives which we actually use as doctors to prescribe to people who are severely constipated, so clearly you are going to lose weight if you not absorbing any of the nutrients and its just passing through your system."

"This can cause so much damage to your digestive system, you lose water, you lose nutrients and you can damage the gut lining."

A petition from Jamil has been signed 138,000 times already, asking for celebrities to be banned from endorsing weight loss products.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Kardashians especially have endorsed numerous weight-loss products, gaining huge criticism from Jameela Jamil especially as well as healthcare professionals. Many have even claimed that they encourage body dysmorphia.

Detox teas have previously faced backlash after a string of unplanned pregnancies happened when the effectiveness of the contraceptive pill was reduced due to the laxative effects in the detox teas.

Be extremely wary of what you're consuming in terms of nutrition, weight-loss is about health, exercise and a balanced diet, not running to the loo every ten minutes.

Keep an eye out for valid healthcare professionals' advice on the matter, and make sure your emotional and mental health is also prioritised.

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One of the UK's most senior doctors, Professor Stephen Powis, has written in The Telegraph that weight loss advertisements which are celebrity-endorsed should be banned.

Professor Powis is currently the NHS' medical director, and has criticised well-known celebrities such as the Kardashians for promoting weight-loss products and aids such as teas, shakes and pills on social media, and has even called for Instagram to oppose them.

The doctor referenced the troubling statistic that more than one in 10 young people are affected by mental health issues in the UK, and are heavily influenced by body insecurity and famous faces encouraging them to lose weight.

He emphasised that mental health issues are one of the "most pressing issues facing out country".

SHEmazing recently wrote about the level of profit which people like the Kardashians can gain from the insecurity of their fans. 

Poor messaging can lead to dangerous consequences, and numerous organisations such as the National Eating Disorder Association have branded the Kardashian family’s representation of weight loss products as ‘triggering’ for those who struggle with eating disorders.

Professor Powis made sure to emphasise that impressionable young people look to these people for lifestyle guidance; "At what is already a sensitive and important time in their development, this group is especially vulnerable to pressures which trigger or exacerbate mental ill health," he writes.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#ad You guys all know I looove @flattummyco shakes. I've just restarted them (it's Day 2 today) and I’m already feeling so good. We had a huuuuge Christmas this year and between that, New Years and everything inbetween… I felt like it was impossible to fit in my regular work outs and eat healthy. But this program is giving me a kick in the right direction that I need. These meal replacement shakes are so good and they're helping me get my tummy back to flat. I’m already feeling amazing and I’m so excited for the next few weeks. Because they’re all about getting women back on track… they’ve got a 20% off sale going on right now, so if you want to start 2019 off right… trust me, you’re going to want to check them out. PS. I’m doing the chocolate program

A post shared by  (@kimkardashian) on

A shocking HALF of young girls say that they feel under pressure to lose weight, the doctor says that social media's ascension has escalated this pressure and both celebrities and the platforms themselves must take responsibility for their posts.

"Our young people are bombarded with ideas, images and advertising which set such a high bar for what they should feel and look like," he writes. "And yet there is little accountability for the impact this has.

"Where celebrities and the platforms which promote them exploit this vulnerability by pushing products like laxative teas, diet pills and other get-thin-quick solutions, they are taking the health of our young people in their hands and should act with far greater responsibility."

Activist and actress Jameela Jamil tweeted her support for Professor Powis:

Prof. Powis also suggested that practical measures should be taken to stamp out the 'exploitation' of youth, such as online platforms "banning adverts for products with a known health risk". YAS KING.

He argued that the NHS is working on understanding and treating mental health conditions in young people;

"Everyone, especially those engaging with young people like social media firms, and celebrities who profit from them, have a duty of care to do more for our health and wellbeing".

"The NHS can't keep putting out fires if some parts of society keep lighting matches," he concluded, using a pretty effective allegory. 

Kim Kardashian West has an especially long history of promoting weight loss products on social media, as well as her sisters, Kylie and Kourtney. Kim faced backlash in May for promoting appetite suppressant lollipops on her Instagram.

One of the world's most powerful women was literally telling other women and young girls NOT TO EAT.  The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil founded the i Weigh body positivity social media movement and Kardashian West "a terrible and toxic influence on young girls".

Jamil has consistently called out celebrities including Cardi B and Iggy Azalea for promoting 'detox' teas, claiming they're just selling digestion problems instead.

She also called Kardashian 'an agent of the patriarchy', for her incessant need to 'recycle self-hatred.'

Jamil herself experienced an eating disorder as a teenager, and skipped meals for years at a time. She spent money on "miracle cures and laxatives and tips from celebrities" which later left her with "digestion and metabolism problems for life".

The Competition and Markets Authority has announced a clampdown on celebrities who don't label their posts as promotional advertisements, but solid rules aren't in place.

NHS England's national mental health director Claire Murdoch expressed concern over the influence which these celebrities have young people at an "impressionable" stage in their lives.

"Both the celebrities themselves and these social media companies themselves should be more responsible," she told BBC Breakfast.

We're so glad the NSH are finally using their influential platform to steer people in the right direction. Time will tell what type of future diet fads will hold, but they're looking highly unpopular right now.

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Body-shaming is still massively prevalent in our society, without question.

Despite the cold, hard fact that it's 2019, people still feel the incessant need to pull others down for their appearance, and their weight.

Loey Lane is a well-known, GORGEOUS, experienced YouTuber who just so happens to be plus-sized. She speaks about it regularly, preaching the value of health above self-hatred and dieting.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

15-25. One is miserable in her own skin, chased the high of seeing a lower number on the scale every time she stepped on. She was overcome by her own demons. One is confident and in love with her own body. She told those demons to fuck off.  Turned off the comments because random people who have no idea who I am don’t know how to act lol. It has nothing to do with weight. It has everything to do with the fact that I hated myself for a long time because of the way I looked, and now everything I do is out of self love. I go to the gym because I love myself, not because I hate my body. I eat healthier because I want to feel good in my own skin. I take better care of myself now than I ever did eating 500 calories a day.

A post shared by(@loeybug) on

The vlogger has now released a shocking video of a diet pill company using footage of her as part of their horrendously shameful advertising campaign.

After returning from a sportswear photoshoot with iconic make-up guru James Charles, the model discovered a video selling diet pills which utilised images of her as their 'before' template, and she's understandably fuming.

CarbonFire 213 Complex makes it ridiculously difficult to find reviews of it online, but the video proclaims the product to be a certified miracle for anyone who wants to lose weight.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Diet pills have entered the media for an assortment of reasons over the last few years, with activists and public figures such as Jameela Jamil slamming weight-loss products which do more harm than good.

The Kardashians are renowned for selling appetite suppressants and weight-loss consumer goods, much to the dismay of many body positivity figures and health experts alike.

There are an array of dangers associated with items such as these, which are essentially glorified laxatives.

The advertising campaigns in the media are arguably as harmful, telling women their weight creates everyday problems such as finding a husband, having failing health and being embarrassed to look in the mirror.

Loey Lane shows the video advert to her following, and it's one of the worst examples of body-shaming we've seen yet. It opens with a beautiful, pale-skinned blonde woman gazing at silk wedding gowns, after her friend asks her to be her maid-of-honour for a wedding.

"How I Fit Into My Wedding Dress" is the video's apparent title, despite the fact that it's NOT HER WEDDING. The problems aren't hard to spot throughout the disgraceful imagery.

gary payton wow GIF by NBA

 The blonde woman looks into the camera lens, and the words; "Believe me, I wasn't always this way. This was me before losing all that weight," flash across the screen.

Lo-and-behold, the woman is now Loey Lane, allegedly the same person as the blonde woman.

Alright then, at this stage we've lost count of the issues within the video, and it's only about ten seconds in.

As if the ad itself isn't traumatising enough to watch, actual graphics for OTHER diet pill companies and body-shaming articles pop up on the side of the screen. An assault is what that is.

"I'm going to share my secret so that it can be easy for you!" the advert claims. Thank God for that.

"A few months ago, one of my best friends from high school texted me. She was getting married and she wanted me to be her bridesmaid. I was SO excited, but there was just one thing… I was SO overweight," the video continues. Wow.

"I couldn't go to the wedding like this, I was so pretty in high school and I would be so embarrassed looking like this. I wanted to go to the wedding and look like I did when I was 18. You know- slim, pretty, looking great in some heels." *Sharpens pitchfork*

"I cut out all junk food. I worked out every single day. After four months, I was still embarrassed to look in the mirror…my personal trainer friend said if I wanted to lose weight fast, I had to supercharge my metabolism."

Classic *insert scientific words here to fumble the consumer's brain* tactics. 

"At this point I was desperate…time was running out." This isn't dismantling a bomb, you won't die if you attend your best friend's wedding at ANY weight.

oh my god omg GIF by TV One

"How could I show my face at the wedding looking like this?" Looking like.. a human woman? *Gasp* "I was even considering not showing up." Priorities aren't in order there, love.

"CarbonFire Complex claimed to boost metabolism using only the healthiest ingredients, they looked very professional." Yes, and Donald Trump looks very diplomatic.

"After only a few days, I dropped a dress size. Ten days later, I lost two dress sizes. I felt lighter on my feet." Because your digestive system has just wasted away, perhaps?

oh my god wtf GIF

"After another week, I was down three sizes. By the time the wedding came around, I lost seven dress sizes. I was getting a LOT more attention from guys, I almost felt bad for the bride, because I was getting so many compliments."

Male attention should be the motivational factor for every woman, after all. 

This all comes at the reasonable price of ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS, by the way. You can buy happiness, male sexual attention and confidence all at this lovely sale.

The blonde woman in the video revealed herself as Amanda John, and she also did not consent to be used for the branding.

So they effectively stole imagery from two women without their permission and used it to scam vulnerable, hard-working people online with low self-esteem because of ads exactly like this, shaming their weight. As if a weighing scales can tell you your worth.

We hope Loey Lane and Amanda John take legal action against CarbonFire Complex, Lord knows they deserve it.

A reminder, there is no such thing as a magic pill. Your worth encompasses your hopes, fears, intelligence, beliefs, morals, family values, friends, career and everything in between, not just your appearance alone.

You can't lose weight and discover joy at the end of the scales.

Take a look at Loey Lane's original video below for some fresh morning rage;

Feature image: @loeybug/Instagram

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The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil is now claiming that Khloe Kardashian has been "fat shamed into a prison of self-critique" following an Instagram post by the reality tv star.

Jamil is an ardent advocate of women's right and body positivity, and currently runs the i Weigh campaign to show women that their worth doesn't stop at their weight.

She is also a prominent speaker for banning airbrushing in the beauty industry, and refuses to allow photographers or magazine publications to edit her image.

The 32-year-old campaigns to end body dysmorphia, and has now focused on Khloe Kardashian for her repeatedly damaging messages aimed at young women.

The Keeping Up With The Kardashians star posted a message to her Instagram story which said: “2 things a girl wants: 1) Lose weight 2) Eat.”

Jamil screenshot the message and uploaded it to Twitter, writing "This makes me sad. I hope my daughter grows up wanting more than this. I want more than this. Sending love to this poor woman. This industry did this to her."

“The media did it to her. They fat shamed her into a prison of self critique. Dear girls, WANT MORE THAN THIS,” she concluded.

Jamil has previously criticised the Kardashian clan for their weight-loss product endorsements, which are essentially laxative meal replacements and possibly encourage body dysmorphia.

The former T4 presenter argues that the family capitalise from the insecurity of others, making money from “the blood and tears of young women who believe in them”.

Jamil attended the Golden Globes with her The Good Place co-stars last Sunday, where the show was nominated for best television series, and claimed she has no intentions of stopping her campaigning.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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She told the Press Association: “They’ll have to kill me to stop me talking out about the rights of women and minorities. It’s something I feel really passionately about I’ve been talking about it for years, I just didn’t have the platform that this amazing show has given me.

“I understand some people think I’m speaking out where it’s not my place, for groups who I don’t necessarily represent, or represent anymore, but I think someone has to say something," she added.

“And no-one listens to the people from marginalised groups so those of us with privilege have a duty to speak out so that their voices can be heard.” Dead right Jameela. You do you, gal.

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Jameela Jamil wasn't taking any risks last night.

Instead of freezing her legs off at the Golden Globes – Jameela popped something underneath her dress.

Forget the spanx or some light tights – the 32-year-old went the whole hog and wore jeans.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

In a clip uploaded to Twitter, Jameela pulls up her pink Monique Lhuillier dress to reveal the life hack.

Although this is the first time the actress has attended the Golden Globes, she knew the weather wouldn't be kind.

She captioned the video: "An experienced woman wears jeans under her golden globes gown because it’s forking COLD."

Fans absolutely loved the move and praised her on social media.

"Just when I thought I couldn't love you any forking more," commented one.

"And that’s why you’re a legend," added another.

We have to say, we will be nicking this life hack – but we'd be more inclined to go for a PJ type style with an elastic waist for maximum comfort. 

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Jameela Jamil might have just won 2018 – like seriously, someone give her an award.

Taking on the world of diet teas, the presenter made an EPIC video which takes the piss out of the false promises influencers and celebs can make about some weight-loss detox products.

The 32-year-old captioned the video: "If celebs and influencers were actually honest with us about some of these diet/detox products…"

The video begins with Jameela in a yellow dress, with a glass of green liquid in hand.

She starts to mimic the same scripts we are all too familiar with when hearing about the diet teas. 

She starts to exaggerate to highlight the ridiculous claims some people make about the drinks: "I've only been taking it for three days and I've already lost 35 pounds and I've got abs…" 

Then commences some more realistic side effects that the liquids can cause – and if you've got a weak stomach, turn off the sound. 

The actress is seen on the toilet with all those juicy sound effects in the background.

Still sticking to the script, her make up is now run down her face and we feel sweaty just looking at her.

"Discount code is in my bio…it burns" she finishes.

We honestly love her so much for being so honest with her experiences with certain detox products. 

So if you are going to buy a diet tea, make sure you know exactly what it does to your body.

We LOVE the real body positive messages that Jameela preaches. 

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This week, Khloe Kardashian came under fire for promoting a weight-loss shake after saying she didn't believe in crash diets – and Jameela Jamil had quite a lot to say about celebs putting their names to diet detox products. 

The actress, who has advocated a positive body image and self-worth through her project I Weigh, took to Twitter to share her thoughts on the prolific manner in which celebrities endorse these teas and shakes on social media. 

She mentioned Crdi B in her rant – which got the attention of the rap queen. 

'They got Cardi B on the laxative nonsense ‘detox’ tea' Jameela wrote. 

'GOD I hope all these celebrities all shit their pants in public the way the poor women who buy this nonsense upon their recommendation do.'

Cardi had a response for Jameela, saying: 'I will never shit my pants cause there’s public restrooms everywhere… Ooh and bushes.'

Jameela's Twitter thread continued: 'If you want to 'curb your appetite' eat some damn green vegetables or have some nutritious natural vegetable soup. You need fiber! Not something that honestly just makes you have diarrhoea the day you take it and constipates you in the long run…'

'Generally just don’t ever take diet advice from women who know nothing about nutrition/basic advertising ethics.'

She then turned her attention to rapper Iggy Azalea, in a post that some have seen as being 'plastic surgery shaming.' 

'When will these women who are covered in plastic surgery stop telling their followers to drink a laxative to look like them? It’s so embarrassing and it’s so encouraging of eating disordered behaviour,' Jameela wrote.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

Over on Instagram, Jameela penned an open letter to celebrities like Blac Chyna, Khloe Kardashian, Kylie Jenner and Amber Rose who flog the weight-loss products.

'I am so sick of the lies. I was so riddled with eating disorders when I was young. I listened to irresponsible celebrities and bought all these bad products and followed their TERRIBLE and toxic diet tips for how they maintained the tiny weight they were… and I fucked up my metabolism and digestive system for life.'

'I damaged my fertility, I was consumed and mentally ill.

'I was obsessed and didn’t eat a meal for over three years as a growing teen. I am not going to stop until we teach people to be better allies to women and stop selling this not at all medically sound shit and rhetoric to us.' 

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