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mental health

Amy Hart has opened up to Grazia Magazine about committing to therapy after leaving the Love Island villa, and the forgiving nature of women in the villa.

The former BA flight attendant has also commented on certain Islanders in particular, namely Maura Higgins' "ever-changing" definition of girl code and the two sides of Curtis Pritchard.

The blonde beauty quit the show after Curtis ended their 720 hour romance, following his head turning in Casa Amor and his new romance with Maura Higgins. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Amy has been open about putting her mental health first, which has earned her fans from all over the world and celebrity support alike.

The former Islander also claims she "cannot fault" ITV for their improved after care, saying: “I’ve got 14 months of therapy guaranteed, but if I need it afterwards I can still have it.

"People have had a lot of bad things to say about them and they might have upped the aftercare, but it’s the same team who’ve worked on the show for five years. I don’t agree with the criticism – they are amazing.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The suicides of former Love Island contestants Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis has drawn criticism and increased scrutiny on ITV over the aftercare of the show.

The broadcaster recently announced a more intense duty of care process for participants on the show, including a minimum of eight therapy sessions.

According to Hart, all the contestants were briefed on the pressure of fame they would face when they exit the famous show, saying: “They told us, ‘You might be a star, but you might not’.

“‘Be aware you won’t be able to go back and work at Tesco afterwards because everyone will know who you are – your work life will change’. We were all very aware."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Amy later blocked the words 'fat' and 'ugly' from appearing on her social media feed, but doesn't regret leaving despite the trolls.

She said: “When you’re thinking rationally you’d think this was all so stupid but it’s such a pressurised environment in there.

“Before leaving I just sat there and thought, ‘There are 17 other people in this villa but I am so lonely’. I went to the Beach Hut and just sobbed.”

She's got job opportunities coming out of her ears now, at least, with Loose Women calling her up to be a permanent guest panellist;

Derry Girls’ Nicola Coughlan said that Richard Curtis, creator of Notting Hill, texted her saying, ‘I never believed in the saying it’s better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, until I watched Amy leave Love Island’".

“The king of romantic comedy! I made him believe in love," she adds, saying that she hasn't been disheartened from finding love again. David Walliams even slid into her DMs, which is an achievement.

The forgiving nature of women has also been commented on by fans;

"‘Yes, 100% we shouldn’t have blamed ourselves. But I was willing to hear all of that and work on myself to make it work," she says. "I did feel humiliated."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Her forgiveness of Curtis has moved on to unconcealed frustration, saying, "We’ve seen two different people in that villa, the Curtis that I knew and the Curtis now. I don’t know which one’s real, because they can’t both be."

Amy has wisely decided not to watch Love Island, but she's aware that Maura and Curtis got together just days after her exit. Maura, she says, definitively does not follow Girl Code;

"The thing with Maura is that she has an ever-changing definition of Girl Code. She constantly moves the goalposts to suit her situation. And then suddenly she decided we were never friends. And I will maintain this forever: we weren’t best friends but we did have a close friendship."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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When asked if she's have happiness for Curtis if he wins the show, Amy replied;

"If I say no that will be the headline!" she says. "If he’s happy I’m happy. If he’s happy and they win that’s fine. No one will beat Tommy and Molly, though I really want Anna and Jordan to win."

Unfortunately, Anna and Jordan have been in the bottom three multiple times and now Jordan's head is getting turned by India, who is coupled up with Ovie. So that ship has most likely sailed…

Feature image: Instagram/@brett_d_cove

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It is Mental Health Awareness Week and we reached out to our readers to have a frank and honest chat about mental health and the workplace.

If you’re suffering with mental health issues like depression or an anxiety disorder, then you know all too well that there are days when going into the office feels completely impossible.

You may be too anxious to get on your train or maybe your depression is so severe you can’t even manage to get out of bed.

They are real and valid issues, but why are we so afraid to talk about them?

52 percent of SHEmazing readers said they have taken a mental health day from work, but more often than not we give our boss a different reason for our absence.

There are so many incredible people working hard to break the stigma surrounding mental health disorders, but we still live in fear of telling someone that ‘I can’t go to work this morning because I’ve had a massive panic attack.’

We can often feel ashamed or embarrassed when opening up about our mental health issues, but why is this?

A fear of not being taken seriously is one of the biggest reasons. When asked if they felt comfortable talking to their boss about their mental health struggles, a striking 83 percent of our readers said no.

So, what can workplaces do to help their employees when it comes to their mental health because saying ‘it is okay not to be okay’ simply isn’t enough anymore.

With suicide rates increasing, we need to provide proper services and support for those suffering.

Our readers had some incredible recommendations about what can be done to support mental health in the workplace.

One reader said: “There should be a liaison officer in your workplace that you can speak to that will keep your anonymity and help you.”

“Allow employees to take a mental health day,” was one of the biggest recommendations.

Others said meditation classes, yoga, flexi-time and regular reminders about self-care would also help.

However, the recommendation that stood out the most was to simply treat it like any other illness. You wouldn’t expect an employee with a flu or broken leg to trek into the office so why should those with crippling depression or a panic disorder feel pressured to show up on days when they feel as low as can be?

Support the See Change campaign this week by wearing a green ribbon and show those who are suffering that they are never alone.

It is time to put an end to mental health stigma.

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Social media app Instagram will hide the total number of 'likes' which posts in Ireland receive in a trial to analyse whether users prefer a less competitive social media environment.

Users themselves will be able to see how many 'likes' their own posts get, but not those of other Instagram users' posts.

A spokesman for the app said; “We are testing this because we want followers to focus on the photos and videos shared, not how many likes they get."

They added; “We don’t want Instagram to feel like a competition. We hope to learn whether this change can help people focus less on likes and more on telling their story.”

The company began testing this new feature in Canada in May, emphasising that the focus should be on the photos and videos themselves rather then the numerical results.

The trial is now being extended to Irish users, with the move likely being welcomes by parents and childrens' welfare organisations due to the negative effects on self-esteem associated with Instagram.

Instagram undoubtedly encourages people to portray an idealised version of their lives among their peers, seeking popularity of friends and acquaintances.

A new Canadian study of 3,826 teenagers discovered that social media may be associated with adolescent depression, as young people compare themselves with filtered, unrealistic images of others.

Instagram users will still be shown the number of comments that other users' posts attracts, which could be used as a proxy for popularity.

Instagram has been seen as the least controversial major social media platform, seeing as Facebook's meddling with elections and 'fake news' has gotten them in trouble, as well as YouTube and Twitter's issues with hate speech.

Tara Hopkins, head of public policy, EMEA at Instagram said; “We want Instagram to be a place where people feel comfortable expressing themselves."

She added; “This includes helping people to focus on the photos and videos they share, not how many likes they get.

"We are now rolling the test out to more countries so we learn more from our global community and see how this can benefit people's experiences on Instagram.”

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Chris Hemsworth has opened up about the mental health difficulties he faced after his career stalled following his appearance in Star Trek.

The actor is a massive Hollywood movie star currently, alongside fellow Chris's Pratt and Pine.

Hemsworth became a household name (along with his brother, Liam) after scoring the role of Thor in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, playing the God of Thunder in nine blockbusters. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The news that Taika Waititi will return as the director of Thor 4 guarantees Chris' return to the role, and it's also confirmed that he will feature in Guardians of the Galaxy 3. 

In summary, he's got no shortage of gig offers. He even competed against himself when Avengers: Endgame and Men In Black: International were released in cinemas at the same time.

However, there was a time before he gripped hold of the hammer when the Australian actor was struggling for work. He had a small role in JJ Abrams' Star Trek, which began as a trilogy.

Hemsworth played Captain Kirk's father in the opening sequence, but things slowed down after playing George Kirk in the reboot.

Image: Den of Geek

He explained; "I got a job pretty quick when I got to Hollywood, so I was very fortunate in that sense. Then I didn’t work for a while and I started to think it might not work out."

Breaking into the acting scene is notoriously difficult and once you have any tiny portion of success, it's even harder to sustain it.

Despite having a role in a huge franchise, he had a hard time working after Star Trek failed. Hemsworth later suffered from deep anxiety during this process, as he emphasised to Heat.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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"I had a huge amount of anxiety when I was auditioning, and that just got worse and worse the more I heard the word ‘no’," Chris said, of the disappointments.

"I did a lot of soul searching on a number of occasions, where I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this? What’s my motivation to put myself through this?'"

If someone as great as Chris Hemsworth can have self-doubt, it can happen to anyone. He put spirited performances into his myriad MCU appearances, as well as his role in Bad Times at the El Royale.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Kevin's Smith's Jay and Silent Bob Reboot is the actor's next project, with Chris recently explaining that he wants to take a break from acting in Hollywood to spend time with his family.

Time will tell what comes next for the God of Thunder, but Thor 4 and Guardians of the Galaxy 3 will keep our Chris pulses alive.

Feature image: Instagram/@geekhane

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Today, multi-platinum selling songwriter and mental health activist, Niall Breslin announced the launch of his own podcast series, Where is my Mind?. Available to listen to today across all streaming platforms, the six episode podcast series will guide listeners on how to navigate the manic, always-on and head-melting world they find themselves in today.

Where is my Mind? will follow Niall discussing what impact today’s society has on individuals, discussing a variety of coping techniques on how to deal with the overstimulated mindset people find themselves in by introducing the basics of mindfulness practice and meditation. Each podcast episode will enable listeners to learn the skills to help with breaking that autopilot mode, how to navigate constant distraction, how to be a more skilful stress-head and even how to get good at Jenga.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Speaking on the announcement, Founder of Where is my Mind?, Niall Breslin said ‘We all share a lot of the same issues and insecurities and to ask are there practical things we can all do to lessen the impact of the lightning-fast, high pressure world on our ability to be able to sleep soundly at night? For me the podcast platform is the most intimate way to explore this context in more detail and perhaps support people in the internal and external difficulties they will inevitably face in this life’.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Niall breslin (@bressie) on

Available to stream today, the first episode of Where is my Mind? discusses how individuals end up zoning out and living on autopilot in today’s hectic world, while looking at various techniques to overcome this habit ensuring to stay present in everyday life.

Other episodes within the podcast series will discuss various topics helping to create a healthier mind space when dealing with various issues such as distraction, chaos in today’s modern world, communication and perspective. Each episode is accompanied by a structured mindfulness programme and a guided meditation where Bressie leads the listener in the principles of mindfulness practice.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Working exclusively with Acast across the podcast series, Jennifer Dollard, Acast’s Content Manager for Ireland said 'Where Is My Mind? is such a beautifully-crafted podcast around mindfulness. It really taps into the power of podcasting – an intimate and engaging environment that helps you to switch off from the world around you. We’re proud to have such a progressive show as part of our network’.

The Where is my Mind? podcast series will be released weekly on Mondays and is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify and all other channels.

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Ex-Islander Amy Hart has opened up about being forced to seek psychological help 12 times during her stint on Love Island following her break-up with Curtis Pritchard.

The air hostess walked out of the villa voluntarily last week and had to leave at least once to get help as she was in such an emotional distress.

She has now opened up about her heartbreak while on Love Island: Aftersun, revealing that she had to make use of the show's therapist on a dozen different occasions.

"I had therapy 12 times in the villa – but I've come out stronger," she told OK! magazine. "I deserve a man who loves me for who I am."

Amy had never had a boyfriend before meeting Curtis, and was destroyed following his decision to end things with her.

The shock move came after his head was turned by Jourdan Riane while Amy went to Casa Amor. Curtis also told her that he couldn't see a future with her on the outside, or marriage and kids.

The professional dancer decided to be brutally honest with the blonde bombshell, who sobbed in the Beach Hut and proclaimed that she couldn't stay and watch him crack on with other women.

Strictly Come Dancing professional and Curtis' brother AJ has claimed that Amy DM'ed him while speaking on talkRADIO.

"She spoke to me. She sent me a message actually afterwards and said she feels like she knows the family and she could only praise Curtis about being honest," he said.

AJ admitted that his brother was too ruthless while speaking to Amy about his feelings;

"Sometimes he was maybe a bit too brutally honest. He could have let her down a bit softer rather than saying, 'yes, I don't see myself marrying you and having kids with you'. "That was harsh, I'm not lying, it was harsh."

AJ and Curtis' mum Debi has also said that she'd like to meet the woman who had her heart broken by her son; "I would like to meet Amy. My heartache is there for Amy and for the parents," she said.

She continued; "When I watched the moment when Curtis told her how he felt, I couldn't stop crying because of all the emotion. I wanted to reach out and give Amy a hug.

"I was thinking of Amy’s mum a lot and I'm so happy Amy is with her family unit now because I know she will be fine and her and Curtis will be friends," she added,

Amy has a new look and seems better than ever, thank the Lord. She's 100 percent stronger after the experience, and we're proud that she speaks so openly about mental health.

Feature image: Twitter/@amyhart1707

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Some of us can live freely without worrying about the location of our mobile phones, and others can't.

Many of us know the sensation of an empty pocket leading to the terrifying feeling of loss when you can't find your phone, many of us don't. 

For certain people, the thought of not knowing where your phone is or not having it on your person at all times can cause genuine fear and anxiety. The scientific word for this is nomophobia.

If you get the feeling of ice cold dread just imagining the absence of your phone, you may be experiencing this 21st century phobia.

The phrase is an abbreviation for ‘no-mobile-phone phobia’, coined back in 2008 during a study of anxieties experienced by mobile phone users by the Post Office (random?).

Bear in mind that this study is now 11-years-old, but it discovered that 53 percent of phone users in the UK are anxious when they "lose their mobile phone, run out of battery, or have no network coverage".

The phobia is set to be among the largest non-drug addictions of this century, which is staggering.

We can now seemingly carry our entire lives with us in our pocket, whether it's for work, research, medical, business, pleasure, friendship, shopping, maps or just general communication.

While this is incredible advancement, it also means that we've grown to rely on the devices, to the point where some of us even feel chained to them.

amy poehler GIF

More recently, a 2017 YouGov study revealing that 38 percent of teenagers felt they couldn’t last a single day without their smartphone on them.

Nomophobia isn’t currently in the edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, but has been proposed as a ‘specific phobia’. It's essentially synonymous with smartphone addiction.

The symptoms of nomophobia are similar to that of other addictions, from dependency to a growing panic psychologically when you're without it for too long, sweating, shaking and heart palpitations.

nyc notice me GIF by ADWEEK

Addictive behaviour can take it's toll when it comes to emotional and psychological ramifications; low self-esteem, constantly seeking reassurance from phones with social media engagement and a low sense of self-worth.

Treatments include EMDR and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and more scientifically-backed options. Professional help is out there when it comes to nomophobia, believe it or not.

Set yourself small goals, like leaving your phone farther away in terms of proximity and for longer periods. Try giving it to somebody to take care of, a trusted friend or family member.

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Log out of social media apps, or even just turn the notifications off. Silence is key, but it's important for you to realise that social media silence doesn't mean loneliness and isolation. 

Aim for more human connection, and give yourself breaks from technology by going on walks with friends or going for dinner with family. It's all about reliance and feeling okay with being totally alone.

Hypnotherapy is also becoming an increasingly common way to treat addiction, and acupuncture. Nomophobia is a totally irrational fear, seeing as we've survived without phones before and can do it again.

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Multiple sources have reported that several Love Island couples have had sex on the show in secret, but the scenes aren't being aired on TV.

Show bosses are allegedly choosing not to show this years' scenes due to fears of "ruining their lives". The show is infamous for the under-the-covers sex scenes and Islanders avoiding the camera.

Only two trips to the Hideaway have been made this year, with Curtis and Amy as well as Molly-Mae and Tommy appearing to keep things PG.

ITV/REX

It's been revealed by an insider that many couples are "doing bits" and more, but producers have opted to conceal the footage to protect the mental health of the contestants.

"It hasn’t been shown on TV – bosses are worried about upsetting them and fear ruining their lives,’ the source added.

The Islanders have all told show producers that they were "not comfortable with their sex scenes being broadcast" and so "bosses have taken it all into account".

Last year, Love Island bosses would just show sex scenes if the participants chose to speak about their bedroom antics afterwards. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The change comes after former 2017 Islander Zara Holland had sex on TV and had her Miss Great Britain title stripped as a result. 

She told the Daily Star: "If I had my time on the show again I would definitely do things differently. I wouldn’t have sex for a start.

"It’s so hypocritical that everyone around me was at it like rabbits but I was the one who lost everything. And I only had sex once, in a private room, under the covers. I regret it," she continued.

“So my advice to this year’s islanders is think before you do it. It could haunt you for the rest of your career."

Image: ITV/tv.bt.com

Amy Hart admitted to "doing bits" with Curtis Pritchard before she left for Casa Amor and he brutally dumped her and morphed into the Toxic Player of the Island (plot twist).

But according to his 26-year-old former 'half-girlfriend', no one wants to have sex on TV because it's been transformed into a family show;

"No one wants to have sex as it’s a family show now,’ she claimed to The Sun. ‘It used to be more niche but my 73-year-old nan and granddad are obsessed with it." Fair enough…

Feature image: Instagram

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We should feel elated when we receive a promotion. We should grin like the Cheshire Cat when we pass that exam we were crippled with worry over. We should jump for joy when we receive high praise for something we worked so hard for, but alas, that isn’t easy for some people, especially for those with imposter syndrome.

More and more people have stepped forward and shared that they suffer from imposter syndrome, but what exactly is it?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Imposter syndrome makes people believe that their achievements are solely down to luck. They do not believe that they deserve to succeed.

The doubt can spiral into severe feelings of fear and guilt. Many people feel that they are a fraud or a phony.

People with imposter syndrome feel like they’re wearing a mask and live in fear that one day people will soon realise that they are not worthy of praise, success and simply got lucky.

Joe Langford and Pauline Rose Clance originally believed imposter syndrome was particularly pervasive among females, however, they later discovered this not to be true.

It is believed over 70 percent of the world’s population suffer from imposter syndrome at some point in their lives.

People can feel guilty or undeserving of their achievements. Famous author Maya Angelou even suffered from it, despite the fact that she was an award-winning writer.

“I have written 11 books but each time I think 'Uh-oh, they're going to find out now’. I've run a game on everybody, and they're going to find me out,” the Pulitzer Prize winner once said.

Imposter syndrome affects everyone and anyone, from iconic female poets to young students in Dublin.

Luckily, there are ways to manage it. The main thing to remember is not to let it suffocate you.

One thing that can help is to drown out negative thoughts. Obviously, this is easier said than done, but we often underestimate the power of positive thinking.

Another thing that can help soothe your worries is to take a walk down memory lane and look back at how far you’ve come in recent years. Think of the days when you were in secondary school fretting about passing your history test and now look at yourself as a graduate with a full-time job.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Remember you’re not the only one struggling with these feelings of doubt. There are so many people going through the same thing so don’t be afraid to open up about it, whether that’s to a colleague, a friend or even a professional.

Leaning on a loved-one and sharing your struggles can help lift that heavy weight off your chest.

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A new report ‘Taking Dogs into the Office' sponsored by Purina Human-Animal Bond Studies sponsorship program and conducted by researchers at the University of Lincoln (UK) shows that employees who often take their dog to work report 22 percent higher satisfaction with working conditions. This new research is the first to quantify the benefits and the impact of dogs in the office on work-related and dog-related outcomes.

It measures parameters such as employees’ engagement and wellbeing or their control over decisions at work, and analyses how the bond between dogs and their owners can be reinforced by being together as well in the office.

 A common myth until now has been that taking dogs into the office could be distracting. This new research shows that employees who take their dog to work report increased absorption in their work by a significant 33.4 percent and in their dedication to work by 16.5 percent – compared to the norm, with an overall increase in work engagement of 14.4 percent.  In fact, researchers suggest that the presence of a friendly dog may increase motivation and attention to set tasks 

Nestlé UK & Ireland, Purina’s sister company, has been welcoming dogs into many of its offices since 2015, with its main offices in Dublin, Gatwick, and York now has over 100 four legged colleagues on the payroll. The company is committed to promoting dog-friendly workplaces to help more people and pets enjoy the benefits of spending more time together. To support more organisations to become dog-friendly, Purina has developed the Pets at Work Alliance, a framework for other companies to follow and enable their employees to bring their pets to work. 

‘Taking Dogs into the Office’ research demonstrates that bringing pets to work increases employees’ performance and productivity and reduces employees’ intention to leave their job. These outcomes highlight potential benefits for companies that allow employees to bring their pets to work. Their employees may be more engaged and productive, and the company might be able to reduce their recruitment costs by avoiding the potential loss of their own talent. 

The findings also show that employees who often take their dog to work report 14.9 percent higher satisfaction with their home-work interface (i.e. in accommodating family and work commitments). In addition, they report 16.9 percent higher scores in their overall work quality of life compared to the norm and 16.6 percent higher control at work, which includes their perceived control over decisions being made at work.

Overall, employees scored 13.1 percent higher for their job-career satisfaction and 4.7 percent higher for their general well-being, with greater levels of happiness and life satisfaction. 

From the dog’s perspective, being able to go to the office with their owner may also be beneficial. Many dogs are left alone for long periods of time, and separation related problems are recognised as one of the most important threats to domestic dog welfare. Therefore, spending more time together also helps strengthen the bond between pets and pet-owners. 

Professor Daniel Mills, Professor of Veterinary Behavioural Medicine, Director of The Animal Behaviour Clinic at the University of Lincoln, and one of the authors of the research along with Dr. Sophie Hall says: “If you told employers there was a simple way to increase their workforce overall satisfaction with the working conditions, they’d be very keen to learn more.

"Our results show that far from being a distraction, (a fear expressed by some in our earlier work) allowing dogs in the workplace has the potential to improve employees’ focus and probably productivity too. Forward-thinking companies should consider very seriously if they can accommodate dogs in the workplace and the Purina Pets at Work programme can enable them to do this efficiently.” 

“Currently, 22 countries have established Pets at Work programmes in Purina and Nestlé offices”, states Bernard Meunier, CEO at Nestlé Purina PetCare Europe, Middle East and North Africa.

“At Purina, we have also supported 80 partners across Europe to implement our framework, become dog-friendly and join our Pets at Work Alliance. Our objective, as part of our commitment to promote pets in the workplace, is to support pets at work initiatives and help 200 companies join our Pets at Work Alliance by 2020”, Meunier confirms. Companies including UniCredit in Italy, wework in France, AFB International in Netherlands and McCann in the UK are already members of this global Alliance.

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A new study has found that young women in Ireland have the highest levels of depression in all of Europe.

The study, which was conducted by Eurofound, revealed that 17 percent of women aged between 15 and 24-years-old are suffering from moderate to severe depression.

The current EU average is 9 percent.

Key factors leading to these concerning numbers include homelessness, eating disorders, cyberbullying and Ireland’s economic crisis.

The study states: “Young women are more likely to find themselves not in employment, education or training, and are significantly more likely to suffer depressive symptoms than young men."

The study also found that young women are more likely to internalise traumatic events and personal issues which is a major cause of depression. This can also lead to eating disorders and self-harm.

It is important to remember that there is help out there if you’re struggling with mental health issues like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or anorexia. There is never any shame in admitting that something is wrong. Seeking help from a doctor, counsellor or other medical professional is terrifying but internalising your problems will only make you feel worse.

See below for a list of mental health helplines in Ireland:

Samaritans

www.samaritans.ie

116 123 

Aware (Depression & Bi-Polar Disorder)

www.aware.ie

1800 80 48 48

supportmail@aware.ie 

Pieta House 

www.pieta.ie

1800 247 247 (National Suicide Helpline)

01 623 5606

Grow (Mental Health Support and Recovery)

www.grow.ie

1890 474 474

Bodywhys

www.bodywhys.ie

1890 200 444

 

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Vicky Pattinson has cautioned fans of reality television shows such as Love Island against writing hateful comments online about individual contestants, emphasising that their words have direct consequences.

The TV star referenced the two suicides of Mike Thalassitis and Sophie Gradon following struggles with mental health, emphasising the fact that these television personalities are human.

The star has faced online vitriol as a result of her roles on Geordie Shore, Ex On The Beach and I'm a Celebrity…Get Me Out Of Here!, so she has a level of empathy for those who essentially become famous overnight.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vicky Pattison (@vickypattison) on

Posting an image of the two former Love Island contestants to her Instagram, Vicky wrote;

"What do you see here?! Let me tell you what I see; two beautiful, charismatic, fun loving and young people who should have had the world at their feet and their whole lives ahead of them. Instead, they left this world all too soon not knowing just how loved they were."

"Now I haven’t managed to catch any of this year’s Love Island. I’ve barely been in the country since it started. But I still read the news, follow the fan accounts, and my group chats still go off every time it’s on… what I’m saying is it is impossible to avoid the reality TV juggernaut." Vicky continued.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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She added;

"I just want to say I think the show is great- and I’m friends with so many of the ex-Islanders who I love a lot. But today I made the mistake of reading some people’s comments on social media when I couldn’t sleep and I’m not going to lie I was both shocked and saddened by what I read."

Love Island bosses have stepped up mental health services for the contestants, and even cite 'mental health pressures' in the contract.

Vicky warns those who use social media to use caution, and remember that the contestants do read the hateful things written about themselves online;

"Regardless of who your favourite is on this show, who you ‘ship’, who you want to win, if you’re mad that someone’s left, or angry someone stayed, no matter what you actually may think or be saying in your group chat with your mates I urge you to be more mindful across social media."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vicky Pattison (@vickypattison) on

The show has come under immense scrutiny after two Islanders took their own lives when their time on the show ended, and the emphasis on body image or physical appearance can cause mental health stress.

"Have we not witnessed the detrimental and irreversible affect our thoughtless words and reckless opinions can have on someone’s mental health?! Why are people still attacking these islanders with such verbal vitriol?!" Vicky said.

"Do you know them personally?! Of course not! Have they done anything to warrant it?! No way. Are they human?! YES! These people are no different to you and me and they have feelings and these hateful comments with have ramifications we can’t even begin to understand."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Mike Thalassitis (@mike_thala) on

Mike Thalassitis, who appeared on Love Island 2017, was found dead in a woodland park near his London home in March. Questions arose about the show's aftercare following the 26-year-old's death.

32-year-old Sophie Gradon died in June of 2018 after struggling with depression. The former Miss Great Britain took part in the show in 2016. She was found dead by her boyfriend, who took his own life 20 days later.

She explained to a friend that she 'wanted to escape' and had 'sold her soul' to appear on the infamous ITV2 show.

Despite these deaths and warnings to be careful of what you write about reality stars online, Vicky pointed out that the hateful vitriol has continued.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Sophie Gradon (@sophiegradon) on

"It’s so ludicrous to me that after everything that’s happened this past year I’m still having to urge people to be kind but here we are. We have lost too many people and I know this isn’t confined to the world of reality TV." 

She added;

"Through the callous words of individuals, online hate and cyber bullying we are breaking people, destroying them and it has to stop. Think before you type. Your words have gravity.

"Please be better than this internet culture of hate. Do not allow it to breed. Be kind, be compassionate. Be human. Let’s put the ‘love’ back in Love Island for Sophie & Mike."

Feature image: Instagram/@vickypattinson

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