HomeTagsPosts tagged with "depression"

depression

Nearly two-in-five third-level students are experiencing serious levels of anxiety and depression as a result of stress, a new survey has revealed.

The newly published 'Report on Student Mental Health in Third-Level Education' was compiled by the Union of Students in Ireland (USI), with the support of the HSE Mental Health and the National Office for Suicide Prevention.

Almost one-third of students have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder, with the results painting a worrying picture of the extent of pressures and struggles on the shoulders of Irish students.

The statistics examined the occurrence of mental health distress and ill health among third-level students and the availability and use of mental health support service for young people.

Multiple factors influence depression and anxiety, and women were found to be more likely to suffer anxiety than men. Non-binary students had the highest levels of severe anxiety.

The survey, which was conducted in 2018, was open to students in every college, North and in the Republic, and most of the respondents were undergraduates aged between 18 and 24-years-old.

74 percent of participants were female, and experiences varied largely depending on the type of college attended, the area of study and whether it was inside or outside of Dublin.

One in five of those surveyed identified as LGBTQ+ and just over 1 percent identified as transgender. 38 percent are experiencing extremely severe levels of anxiety, alarmingly.

30 percent of people are reporting suffering from depression and 17 percent are experiencing stress. Almost one-third reported that they had a formal mental health difficulty which was diagnosed.

One of the most distressing points is that 21 percent of participants did not have someone to talk to about personal and emotional difficulties. Free on-campus counselling is imperative for students.

Students were found to use on and off-campus services to aid their mental health, and the student union made 35 percent of students aware of support services. 

The study had a large response of 3,340 students, but the findings may not be a full picture of the student population.

Employment during college was also found to affect students' ability to socialise with their classmates, and those involved in activities outside of coursework had improved mental health.

USI president Lorna Fitzpatrick in Trinity College Dublin said students had provided a vast amount of vital data which would be used to improve mental health services at third level for everyone.

Numerous institutions were found to be problematic in terms of the quality of care offered to students, and a quality assurance tool must be made to ensure consistency between institutions.

Transitioning from secondary school to college is a huge step for all students, and comes at a time when they are most at risk of developing mental health difficulties.

Trending

WW, formerly known as WeightWatchers, launched a diet and nutrition app marketed at children and adolescents this week and have faced immense backlash since.

Kurbo by WW is a free programme that claims to help eight-year-olds to 17-year-olds "build healthy habits", and lose weight through personalised coaching and food tracking.

The app's "traffic light" diet approach categorises foods as red, yellow and green (red being the most process, sugar-filled, yellow being lean protein and pasta and green being fruit and veg).

Kurbo by WW was developed at Stanford University, and WW have defended their programme by stating the app is backed by safe scientific studies. 

CEO of WW, Mindy Grossman, said; "To change the health trajectory of the world, we have a tremendous opportunity, but also a responsibility, to help kids, teens and families adopt healthy habits."

Many critics of the app insist that encouraging kids and teenagers to diet can perpetuate an unhealthy and dangerous mindset.

Fatphobic cultural messaging around dieting has led to a massive issue surrounding eating disorders and mental health among youth.

In an article published in Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics in 2015, researchers found that because adolescence is such an important time for body image development, 12-to-18-year-olds with a negative perception of their body or weight are more likely to develop eating disorders or dysfunctional exercise habits.

Of course, obesity can be linked to numerous health concerns but disordered eating and mental health conditions among adolescent is reportedly more likely to pose a dangerous risk than paediatric obesity.

35-to-37 percent of adolescent girls in the US alone report using unhealthy weight loss measures, according to the National Eating Disorder Association. These methods include fasting, smoking, taking laxatives and 'skinny teas', skipping meals and even vomiting.

One-in-three adolescents in the UK alone reported experiencing mental health issues, according to a troubling survey by the charity Action for Children. 

More than 12 percent of adolescents in the US are affected by depression every year. 

Many people on social media were furious about the Kurbo by WW app. Jameela Jamil, an activist and actress who runs the iWeigh campaign for body positivity, tweeted her disgust at the news.

“Are we kidding? Breeding obsession with weight and calories and food at the age of…8?" she wrote. "I was 11 when my obsession started, due to being put on a diet for being the heaviest girl in the class. I became afraid of food. It ruined my teens and twenties.”

Petitions have already been created against the app, with the hashtag #LoveNotDiets trending to urge parents to use love rather than diets to help their nutritional habits.

Childhood obesity is still an incredibly serious public health challenge of the 21st century, and the app attempts to reduce a child's sugar intake. There is nothing wrong with promoting healthy foods and exercising for physical and mental health benefits. 

However, many parents feel that instilling a diet-centered mindset among young people who are already vulnerable could be a dangerous mistake. Targeting the mental health crisis could be a more productive way forward.

Feature image: Instagram/@coachdavidflowers

Trending

A smartphone app has been designed to manage negative emotions and periods of anxiety in order to reduce self-harm in young people, new data has revealed.

BlueIce is a prescribed app and is created to be used alongside face-to-face therapies, overseen by medical professionals.

Clinical psychologist Professor Paul Stallard, of the University of Bath, developed the app in conjunction with patient groups.

A number of papers published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research emphasise that the app could help tackle self-harm in young people.

Head of psychological therapies for Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Prof Stallard, claims the idea for BlueIce came about as a result of his work with child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

“Many of the young people I was working with were self-harming but nearly all had their mobile phone close by,” he said.

“Our young people’s participation group at Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust thought that a smartphone app could be a way of helping at times of distress, and with their input we produced BlueIce," he continued

“It helps the young person to monitor and manage their unpleasant emotions and to find alternative ways of coping," Prof Stallard added.

“Feedback from young users has been overwhelmingly positive, and there’s a huge potential for it to make a difference to young lives across the UK and internationally.”

BlueIce refers to low mood and ICE (in case of emergency) and is now included on the NHS Apps Library, which holds apps which have undergone technical and clinical reviews.

The app has a mood wheel for young people to keep track of their mood every day, adding notes on their current emotions and actions

The user is immediately routed to a mood-lifting section if a low mood is reported, which has activities designed to reduce distress.

Options include ideas from Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT), and personalised mindfulness guides, images and music.

BlueIce can also take users to emergency contacts like Childline and the 111 service.

Professor Stallard assessed the influence of using the app for three months on a group of 40 young people aged between 12 and 17.

He discovered that 73 percent of those involved either stopped self-harming or reduced it as a result of the app.

BlueIce is currently being used by CAMHS services in Bath, North East Somserset, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Oxfordshire and Wiltshire.

It's also being evaluated in a randomised controlled trial undertaken across Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne.

Professor Stallard will start a trial in September to analyse whether BlueIce reduces the number of young people taken to A&E.

Trending

Little Mix singer Jesy Nelson has emotionally opened up about her body positivity journey to her Instagram followers, describing how she saw herself as the 'fat one from Little Mix'.

The musician won The X Factor in 2011 with the girl group, and has recently filmed a new documentary exploring body image and mental health for BBC One and BBC Three.

The 28-year-old explained to her 5.4 million followers on social media that she wanted to 'erase' her former self 'from my mind and everyone else's memory' until only six months ago.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by @jesynelson on

The caption reads; "Six months ago this girl was someone I just wanted to forget. I wanted to erase her from my mind and everyone else’s memory. I didn’t see her as Jesy I saw her as “the fat one from Little Mix”.

"Up until now I hated her not because she’d ever done anything bad but because I was made to hate her by endless amounts of trolling. Since filming my documentary for @bbcone and @bbcthree I’ve learned so much more than I ever expected to," the singer continued.

"Thanks to all the inspirational people I’ve met on this emotional journey, I now love the girl in this photo. I’ve made this documentary for 2011 Jesy and for anyone who might be feeling like she did. I refused to speak about how I was feeling for so long."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by @jesynelson on

The Little Mix star, who is loved up with her reality tv star boyfriend Chris Hughes, encouraged her followers to open up about their body image struggles and get mental health assistance if needed;

"I was embarrassed and scared to. But I was so wrong to feel that way. Please if you are feeling how I did, SPEAK ABOUT IT. Talk to your family, speak to your friends, there’s always help out there," she added.

"If you’d have told that girl one day you won’t feel sad anymore, I’d never have believed you….and here I am. Now when I look in the mirror, I don’t see Jesy the fat one, I see Jesy the happy one."

Feature image: Instagram/@jesynelson

Trending

by

Social media app Instagram will hide the total number of 'likes' which posts in Ireland receive in a trial to analyse whether users prefer a less competitive social media environment.

Users themselves will be able to see how many 'likes' their own posts get, but not those of other Instagram users' posts.

A spokesman for the app said; “We are testing this because we want followers to focus on the photos and videos shared, not how many likes they get."

They added; “We don’t want Instagram to feel like a competition. We hope to learn whether this change can help people focus less on likes and more on telling their story.”

The company began testing this new feature in Canada in May, emphasising that the focus should be on the photos and videos themselves rather then the numerical results.

The trial is now being extended to Irish users, with the move likely being welcomes by parents and childrens' welfare organisations due to the negative effects on self-esteem associated with Instagram.

Instagram undoubtedly encourages people to portray an idealised version of their lives among their peers, seeking popularity of friends and acquaintances.

A new Canadian study of 3,826 teenagers discovered that social media may be associated with adolescent depression, as young people compare themselves with filtered, unrealistic images of others.

Instagram users will still be shown the number of comments that other users' posts attracts, which could be used as a proxy for popularity.

Instagram has been seen as the least controversial major social media platform, seeing as Facebook's meddling with elections and 'fake news' has gotten them in trouble, as well as YouTube and Twitter's issues with hate speech.

Tara Hopkins, head of public policy, EMEA at Instagram said; “We want Instagram to be a place where people feel comfortable expressing themselves."

She added; “This includes helping people to focus on the photos and videos they share, not how many likes they get.

"We are now rolling the test out to more countries so we learn more from our global community and see how this can benefit people's experiences on Instagram.”

Trending

A new study has found that young women in Ireland have the highest levels of depression in all of Europe.

The study, which was conducted by Eurofound, revealed that 17 percent of women aged between 15 and 24-years-old are suffering from moderate to severe depression.

The current EU average is 9 percent.

Key factors leading to these concerning numbers include homelessness, eating disorders, cyberbullying and Ireland’s economic crisis.

The study states: “Young women are more likely to find themselves not in employment, education or training, and are significantly more likely to suffer depressive symptoms than young men."

The study also found that young women are more likely to internalise traumatic events and personal issues which is a major cause of depression. This can also lead to eating disorders and self-harm.

It is important to remember that there is help out there if you’re struggling with mental health issues like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or anorexia. There is never any shame in admitting that something is wrong. Seeking help from a doctor, counsellor or other medical professional is terrifying but internalising your problems will only make you feel worse.

See below for a list of mental health helplines in Ireland:

Samaritans

www.samaritans.ie

116 123 

Aware (Depression & Bi-Polar Disorder)

www.aware.ie

1800 80 48 48

supportmail@aware.ie 

Pieta House 

www.pieta.ie

1800 247 247 (National Suicide Helpline)

01 623 5606

Grow (Mental Health Support and Recovery)

www.grow.ie

1890 474 474

Bodywhys

www.bodywhys.ie

1890 200 444

 

Trending

Vicky Pattinson has cautioned fans of reality television shows such as Love Island against writing hateful comments online about individual contestants, emphasising that their words have direct consequences.

The TV star referenced the two suicides of Mike Thalassitis and Sophie Gradon following struggles with mental health, emphasising the fact that these television personalities are human.

The star has faced online vitriol as a result of her roles on Geordie Shore, Ex On The Beach and I'm a Celebrity…Get Me Out Of Here!, so she has a level of empathy for those who essentially become famous overnight.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vicky Pattison (@vickypattison) on

Posting an image of the two former Love Island contestants to her Instagram, Vicky wrote;

"What do you see here?! Let me tell you what I see; two beautiful, charismatic, fun loving and young people who should have had the world at their feet and their whole lives ahead of them. Instead, they left this world all too soon not knowing just how loved they were."

"Now I haven’t managed to catch any of this year’s Love Island. I’ve barely been in the country since it started. But I still read the news, follow the fan accounts, and my group chats still go off every time it’s on… what I’m saying is it is impossible to avoid the reality TV juggernaut." Vicky continued.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vicky Pattison (@vickypattison) on

She added;

"I just want to say I think the show is great- and I’m friends with so many of the ex-Islanders who I love a lot. But today I made the mistake of reading some people’s comments on social media when I couldn’t sleep and I’m not going to lie I was both shocked and saddened by what I read."

Love Island bosses have stepped up mental health services for the contestants, and even cite 'mental health pressures' in the contract.

Vicky warns those who use social media to use caution, and remember that the contestants do read the hateful things written about themselves online;

"Regardless of who your favourite is on this show, who you ‘ship’, who you want to win, if you’re mad that someone’s left, or angry someone stayed, no matter what you actually may think or be saying in your group chat with your mates I urge you to be more mindful across social media."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Vicky Pattison (@vickypattison) on

The show has come under immense scrutiny after two Islanders took their own lives when their time on the show ended, and the emphasis on body image or physical appearance can cause mental health stress.

"Have we not witnessed the detrimental and irreversible affect our thoughtless words and reckless opinions can have on someone’s mental health?! Why are people still attacking these islanders with such verbal vitriol?!" Vicky said.

"Do you know them personally?! Of course not! Have they done anything to warrant it?! No way. Are they human?! YES! These people are no different to you and me and they have feelings and these hateful comments with have ramifications we can’t even begin to understand."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Mike Thalassitis (@mike_thala) on

Mike Thalassitis, who appeared on Love Island 2017, was found dead in a woodland park near his London home in March. Questions arose about the show's aftercare following the 26-year-old's death.

32-year-old Sophie Gradon died in June of 2018 after struggling with depression. The former Miss Great Britain took part in the show in 2016. She was found dead by her boyfriend, who took his own life 20 days later.

She explained to a friend that she 'wanted to escape' and had 'sold her soul' to appear on the infamous ITV2 show.

Despite these deaths and warnings to be careful of what you write about reality stars online, Vicky pointed out that the hateful vitriol has continued.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Sophie Gradon (@sophiegradon) on

"It’s so ludicrous to me that after everything that’s happened this past year I’m still having to urge people to be kind but here we are. We have lost too many people and I know this isn’t confined to the world of reality TV." 

She added;

"Through the callous words of individuals, online hate and cyber bullying we are breaking people, destroying them and it has to stop. Think before you type. Your words have gravity.

"Please be better than this internet culture of hate. Do not allow it to breed. Be kind, be compassionate. Be human. Let’s put the ‘love’ back in Love Island for Sophie & Mike."

Feature image: Instagram/@vickypattinson

Trending

 

A new Journal of Psychiatric Research-published study has found that women who naturally are early to bed and early to rise are less prone to depression.

A team from the University of Colorado Boulder and the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston analysed data from more than 32,000 female nurses in their research.

This is both the largest and most detailed observational study examining chronotype (a person's sleep-wake preference) and mood disorders.

Speaking on the findings, lead author Céline Vetter told Science Daily, "Our results show a modest link between chronotype and depression risk. This could be related to the overlap in genetic pathways associated with chronotype and mood."

Even after accounting for environmental factors, their findings suggest that there is a link between chronotype, which is partially determined by genetics, and likelihood of depression.

The team came to their conclusions after exploring data from 32,470 women, average age 55, who participated in the Nurses' Health Study.

They started tracking the women's health in 2009 when they were all depression-free. Over the next four years, the researchers followed the women to see who developed depression.

The participants filled out health questionnaires every two years. When answering questions about their sleep patterns, 37 percent said that they were early types. 53 percent described themselves as intermediate types and another 10 percent said they were evening types.

After accounting for depression risk factors like body weight, physical activity, chronic disease, sleep duration, or night shift work, the team still found that early risers were less prone to depression.

More specifically, early risers had a 12 to 27 percent lower risk of depression than intermediate types.

"This tells us that there might be an effect of chronotype on depression risk that is not driven by environmental and lifestyle factors," Vetter, who is also director of the Circadian and Sleep Epidemiology Laboratory (CASEL) at CU Boulder, noted.

Whether we're a night owl or early bird is partially determined by genetics, and research has shown that this trait has a 12 to 42 percent heritability.

Certain genes, like PER2 and RORA, influence both when we prefer to go to bed and rise as well as influence depression risk.

"Alternatively, when and how much light you get also influences chronotype, and light exposure also influences depression risk," Vetter said.

"Disentangling the contribution of light patterns and genetics on the link between chronotype and depression risk is an important next step."

It's not all bad news for night owls, though, she said: "Yes, chronotype is relevant when it comes to depression but it is a small effect."

She recommends that evening types take certain steps that will help them turn in earlier, as people can influence their bedtime preferences.

Getting enough sleep, spending time outdoors, getting daylight, exercising, and dimming lights at night can all help you embrace your inner early bird.

Trending

Maisie Williams, AKA the legend that plays the single most badass woman on television, has opened up about her mental health in an interview with Fearne Cotton.

After emerging in the acting scene at an early age through her Game of Thrones role as Arya Stark, Williams has had to face a barrage of negative comments on social media since her fame originated.

Speaking to Cotton on her Happy Place podcast, the actress said that it became “impossible to turn a blind eye” to the ruthlessly mean comments. 

“It gets to a point where you're almost craving something negative so you can sit in a hole of sadness,” she added. “It's really bizarre the way that it starts to consume you."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Maisie Williams (@maisiewilliamsactress) on

Her co-star, Sophie Turner, recently made an appearance on the Dr Phil show to discuss her own struggles with depression, citing social media as the cause. Hateful comments about her weight, acting abilities and skin were posted online, when she was just a teenager.

Maisie explained that she finds herself experiencing life-altering feelings of self-hatred, which must be incredibly difficult to overcome. “It's something I'm really trying to break free from at the moment," she said.

"I went through a huge period of my life where I'd tell myself every day that I hated myself. It got to a point where I'd be in a conversation with my friends and my mind would running and running, and I'd be thinking about all the stupid things I've said in my life and it would just race and race.

"We'd be talking and I'd be like 'I hate myself'.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Maisie Williams (@maisie_williams) on

Williams began attempting to discover why exactly these emotions were haunting her, and turned to her past for answers;

"So many of these problems are really linked to things in your past,” she explained, “as soon as you start digging and start asking yourself bigger questions than: Why do I hate myself? It's more: Why do you make yourself feel this way?"

The star confirmed that, at the moment, mental health is something she is “really working on”. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reuben Selby (@reubenselby) on

“One thing I learnt is that everyone is a little bit sad and it was really eye-opening to me to understand that I think," she continued. "The more we talk and the more we help one another, I think that’s really important.”

Well, we applaud Arya for opening up to the public. While it's not her responsibility, she's a huge role model for young women and we ADORE her.

As well as her stunning boyfriend, Reuben Selby, even though he said Jon Snow should have killed the Night King. IT WAS ARYA'S DESTINY, OKAY?

Feature image; Instagram/@maisiewilliamsactress

Trending

It's official: Ariana Grande has overtaken Selena Gomez as the world's most followed woman on Instagram. The figures are SO tight though; Ari now has 146,337,497 and Selena is slightly behind with  146,289,115.

Unfortunately for Thank U Next fans, Cristiano Ronaldo is still the most followed person, with 155 million followers compared to the Sweetener singer's 146 million.

However, considering everything Ms Grande has achieved this year, we believe she can gain the nine million needed in no time.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

Billboard are claiming that Ariana gained a huge 13 million followers on the social media site over the last four months, coinciding with the release of her record breaking albums Sweetener and Thank U, Next.

Weirdly, it also comes at the same time as her break-up from former fiancé Pete Davidson in October. The pair made the headlines after the split, coming only five months after their engagements and six months after they began dating.

It was never going to end well, was it? Ari also had a turbulent time with the overdose and subsequent death of her ex-boyfriend Mac Miller.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

More recently, she won the Best Pop Album Grammy award, and became the first solo artist to hold the top three Billboard Hot 100 singles (7 Rings, Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I'm Bored and Thank U, Next), and hold the number one album spot at the same time.

Her online wars with the likes of Grammy producers who insulted her (how dare they??) and Piers Morgan has also drawn attention to her accounts.

Meanwhile, singer and actress Selena Gomez has lost followers after taking a four-month break from social media in September after entering a treatment facility for her mental health.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

She required medical help with her anxiety and depression, saying in a video at the time;

"As much as I am grateful for the voice that social media gives each of us, I am equally grateful to be able to step back and live my life present to the moment I have been given."

"Kindness and encouragement only for a bit. Just remember: negative comments can hurt anybody’s feelings," she said. 

Come on lads, lets dethrone Cristiano Ronaldo. Ari's Instagram game is far stronger…Just sayin'

Feature image: Instagram/@arianagrande/@selenagomez

Trending

Jessie J has shown her vulnerable side to her millions of followers in a new Instagram video, which has currently racked up almost half a million views.

She opens up about her struggles with anxiety and depression while encouraging the younger generation not to "hide their real feelings behind a perfected edited image."

The British artist attempts to hold back tears as she plays the piano and sings, explaining that she's been feeling "kinda off", and wanted to express herself through music. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by J E S S I E . J (@jessiej) on

"I didn't know I would cry. I was live for a minute or two before this moment," Jessie explains "But it's important to be open that we are not always done up and feeling 100."

The 30-year-old is trying to set a good mental health example for younger and older generations, saying; "In a time and a world (especially the social world), sadly vulnerability is often seen as weakness."

She captioned the post; "I’m not posting this for sympathy. Im posting this for anyone who needs to see it (I needed it). This video is from yesterday. I woke up, feeling kinda off. I sat at the piano (which I’ve been avoiding) knowing it will bring some stuff up."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@jessiej) on

The continued, emotionally expressing her hope that vulnerability can be seen as a strength in the future;

"I’m making it up and feeling my real feelings. I went live as I wanted to share with you guys the moment. I didn’t know I would cry. I was live for a minute or two before this moment. But it’s important to be open… All of us have our days. Yesterday was one of my weird emotional days."

"The younger generation are almost being taught to hide their real feelings behind a perfected edited image. Hence why anxiety and depression in kids is through the roof and only carries to their adult life if it doesn’t change."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@jessiej) on

"One of the biggest killers in men under 30 is suicide," she said, nothing the shocking statistics, especially for the male gender, who account for eight in 10 suicides in Ireland every year.

"We push our feelings to the bottom of our energy and hope it goes away. It won’t. Don’t define yourself on it. But stand with it, process it and learn from it. Find YOUR happiness. No one can make you happy but you. People can contribute. But ultimate happiness comes from within. It’s a personal journey."

She concluded; "I have said time and time again in recent years I don’t want to be a role model but I want to inspire. To anyone young or older. Let your sadness/pain/grief out. In your OWN way."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@jessiej) on

"Another thing… TALK to people you love when you are down. Please do not suffer in silence. Life is way too short and ALWAYS GETS BETTER. I’m thinking of you and sending love to your heart," she said.

The singer has been open in the past about her struggles with grief and sadness, especially after the recent death of her head bodyguard over the New Year.

The video is hugely emotional, and we hope it inspires her fans, young and old, to allow themselves to be vulnerable. With the digital age, mental health statistics for young people are worse then ever.

Jessie J really is one brave, talented gal. 

Feature image: Instagram/@jessiej

Trending

by

Alongside Prada and Gucci's blackface scandals, major fashion brands have recently come under fire for making some major PC-related errors.

Burberry is the latest company to be added to this list of elite couture scandals, after their autumn/winter collection at London Fashion Week featured a hoodie with strings resembling a noose.

Yes, you read that right. An actual noose, akin to those used for lynchings or suicides. They really didn't think this one through…and now the model who wore the design down the runway has expressed her horror;

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 (@liz.kennedy_) on

Liz Kennedy, turned to Instagram to illustrate her anger and disturbance after she was fitted wearing the hoodie, as suicide touches a personal nerve for her.

"Suicide is not fashion. It is not glamorous nor edgy and since this show is dedicated to the youth expressing their voice, here I go. Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry: it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway," she wrote.

She stated that the Burberry team "briefly hung one from the ceiling (trying to figure out the knot) and were laughing about it in the dressing room. I had asked to speak to someone about it but the only thing I was told to do was to write a letter."

The brand released an apology statement following a huge wave of backlash after the runway show, and the design is now removed from the new collection.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HYPEBAE (@hypebae) on

According to Fortune, Marco Gobbetti, Burberry chief executive officer, said;

"We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection. I called Ms. Kennedy to apologise as soon as I became aware of this on Monday and we immediately removed the product and all images that featured it."

He continued, "Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake."

The fashion faux pas follows Gucci's debut of a $890 balaclava sweater that evoked blackface images earlier this month.

Liz Kennedy also mentioned the impressionable young women who would see the noose hoodie;

"How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth. The impressionable youth. Not to mention the rising suicide rates world wide. Let’s not forget about the horrifying history of lynching either."

"I left my fitting extremely triggered after seeing this look (even though I did not wear it myself). Feeling as though I was right back where I was when I was going through an experience with suicide in my family," she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 (@liz.kennedy_) on

Kennedy also claims that she attempted to speak to someone about it, but was brushed off;

"I had a brief conversation with someone but all that it entailed was “it’s fashion. Nobody cares about what’s going on in your personal life so just keep it to yourself” well I’m sorry but this is an issue bigger than myself."

"The issue is not about me being upset, there is a bigger picture here of what fashion turns a blind eye to or does to gain publicity. A look so ignorantly put together and a situation so poorly handled. I am ashamed to have been apart of the show. #burberry."

The collection, Tempest, is Riccardo Tisci’s second for the brand. Marco Gobbetti has since called Kennedy to apologise personally and address the situation.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Riccardo Tisci (@riccardotisci17) on

In an updated post, Kennedy wrote;

"My family and I were recently impacted by suicide so I know how devastating it is when someone you love decides to take their life. I’m not someone who is easily offended or triggered but I knew by the way this piece effected me, it would do the same to many others."

She continued, referencing Marco Gobbetti, Burberry's chief executive;

 "Whether people are dealing with suicide, mental illness themselves, or someone close to them facing these issues they can’t be taken lightly. Since my post, Marco called me to address the situation."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Love (@phoebephilochaser) on

"I think the response by Burberry and their team since then is commendable. I believe this is a learning moment and they will think about these things more in-depth moving forward."

The model bravely spoke out about the incident, and the brand has responded. It just goes to show that fashion isn't completely rigid, and it's valuable to call them out on their mistakes.

"The positive that has come out of this is a reminder of the power of one voice, and the good that can be done when brands are held accountable."

Feature image: Adweek

Trending