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Beauty means something different to everyone. An episode of Sherlock I distinctly remember had the protagonist declare while giving the Best Man’s speech at a wedding; “Beauty is a construct based entirely on childhood impressions, influences and role models.”

At the time, I was roughly 16 years old, obsessed with changing absolutely everything about my appearance. During my school days, everyone wanted to look the same.

The same tanned skin, bright blonde hair which is pretty much only natural if you are of Scandinavian descent, contoured cheekbones and slender figure with a waistline that most likely requires a corset to maintain.

Being different was not only seen as unattractive, it was even feared.

It was only when I entered college and saw beauty expanding its traits that my eyes were opened to different types of aesthetically pleasing looks. As well as this, I began to understand that confidence is beauty.

Happiness is beauty, intelligence is beauty, generosity is beauty. And that beauty is often the least interesting thing about a person.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by rupi kaur (@rupikaur_) on

However, the ideal of beauty which had been prominent during my secondary school years remained the same until the Kardashians exploded onto the reality TV scene, and over the course of the last decade have altered the idea of beauty as we know it.

With their bum and breast implants, nose jobs, cheek implants, lip fillers, whitened teeth among other procedures I don’t have the vocabulary to describe, somehow the idea of what was beautiful drastically changed.

Body modification became far more normalised, as well as the fact that social media gave audiences the power of knowledge.

While celebrities were undoubtedly changing their faces and bodies for decades, especially ones on our cinema and TV screens, social media and the internet now gave us the tools to recognise when ‘work’ had been done.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Consultant Clinic (@consultant_clinic) on

One fascinating case which has attracted massive public attention in the last few weeks is that of Elliot Joseph Rentz, otherwise known as Alexis Stone.

The make-up and drag artist garnered public furore after revealing a massively drastic surgical transformation to his large social media following, uploading reveal videos to his YouTube channel which were bombarded with negative comments spewing hateful language and even death threats.

Rentz began the process on August 1 of last year, explaining to his following in a video;

“I don’t want to look the way I look today. I don’t connect with what I see. I never have. So I’m changing it all. I’ve been called crazy. I’ve been called botched. I’ve been called an addict. I’ve been called ugly. I’m told every single day that I’ve ruined my face,” he claimed, emphasising that every last cent he owned would be given to his surgical dream of metamorphosis.

“You name it, I’m having it done,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Alexis uploads a video titled “The Reveal”, which has since racked up over 450,000 views. In the diary-like visual film, the drag artist shows off his brand new face, which included fat grafts to his nose, forehead, and chin, as well as chin and cheek implants and an eye lift.

“This had nothing to do with vanity and everything to do with sanity,” he quotes, directly from Pete Burns’ biography.

One month later, Rentz uploads a compilation of comments, each more vicious and negative than the next. Some of them are hard to read.

Stone later claimed his so-called friends and family members often joined in on the vitriolic, with some people even telling him to take his own life, and that his ex-boyfriend committed suicide because of Stone.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Roll on January 1 2019, and Stone reveals in a lengthy YouTube documentary that the whole six-month journey was a complete hoax – his new ‘botched’ face was a complex mask.

Working with Academy Award-winning makeup artist David Marti, a stunt mask was even developed from prosthetic facial materials to be worn outside of the house. Months of effort and secrecy had led to this, and the result was fascinating.

He referred to the stunt as a social experiment, while others called it a cry for mental health help, an attention seeking performance or even a show of disrespect for those who have undergone extreme surgery themselves for whatever reason.

So why did he do it, and what did his social experiment show about society’s idea of beautiful versus ‘botched’ surgery?

Ireland’s perception of the cosmetic surgery industry is vastly different from the reality.

Dozens of clinics have popped up all over the country – Westport in County Mayo is even the predominant creator and exporter of the world’s botox – and yet there is an element of hushed secrecy to the entire organisation.

It is rare to find an Irish person who opens up about having plastic surgery, we are a country of people who lament so-called ‘narcissism’, yet self-confidence issues remain potent within our society.

In a society that profits from self-doubt, liking yourself is an act of rebellion.

Jameela Jamil has frequently found herself in the public eye for her scathing indictment of the Kardashian family, arguing that their world is one which 'recycles self-hatred'.

Yet the reality TV clan have essentially transformed the perception of beauty over the last decade, morphing women into self-obsession with curves, plumped up lips, tanned skin and bodycon clothing.

“You’re selling us self-consciousness,” she claims, portraying her deep disappointment of the ‘double-agents to the patriarchy’. Her main issue with the Kardashians is their weight-loss product endorsements, which are basically a fancier packaging for laxatives in protein shake form.

The family have abundant riches which can afford the best photoshop, photographers, airbrushing, personal trainers, stylists, dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons the world can offer.

Even a glance over websites aimed at young women such as Boohoo, Missguided and PrettyLittleThing shows the huge changes in the beauty industry.

Their models have hyper-miniscule waists and voluptuous curves, glossy brunette locks, tanned skin and full lips, highly reminiscent of the Kardashian family’s idea of what beauty means.

The #10YearChallenge has proven at least one thing; those who have money have a greater control over their appearance than those who don’t.

Body modification has become normalised in society, whether it’s permanent or semi-permanent. Contouring, filters on our social media apps, airbrushing, make-up tutorials on YouTube and cosmetic surgery all reflect the culture we live in, which constantly tells us what we look like isn’t enough.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Muriam Waseem (@muriamwasi) on

And yet, if a person who changes their appearance is genuinely happier and finds improvement in their mental health and self-esteem as a result of body modification, who are we to judge their lifestyle choices?

Choice is the vital word here. Our society and law consistently shows that it believes it possesses the right to control other people’s bodies. Specifically female bodies.

If another person has the funds and is of sound mind, shouldn’t they be allowed to alter their body if it sparks joy in them, to reference the iconic Marie Kondo?

What struck me most was the understanding which the public has for those undergoing body modification for the sake of their physical health.

Whether it’s a nose job for aiding breathing, a breast reduction surgery to alleviate back pain or even just braces, the level of support appears to be significantly higher when physical health is taken into account, rather than perceived vanity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by River Medical (@rivermedical) on

Yet if a person’s mental health is suffering as a result of their appearance, is this not still a health reason? On an ‘extreme’ level, is transitioning from a male or female gender to the opposite biological sex classified as body modification?

In this case, a person’s mental health would presumably suffer as a result of their appearance, should they not identify with who they see in the mirror.

Cases of body dysmorphia are higher than ever in Ireland, obsession with one’s flaws can cause great emotional pain. Yet we fixate on the reasoning for a person’s body modification, we presume we have the right to judge them for their choices.

SHEmazing spoke to a young woman named Gráinne, who underwent breast reduction surgery at the age of 19, and never looked back. She was plagued with back pain throughout her secondary school years, but the daily toll which her chest took on her confidence and mental health was the final straw;

“For my own personal experience I would say, I think my chest came in in like first year when I was 13, and got bigger after that. I’d say it probably crossed my mind, a chest reduction every once in a while. You’d be trying on clothes and things just wouldn’t fit, whether it was bikini or swimsuits or whatever, I couldn’t buy clothes that fit. You’d be thinking, ‘just chop them off and be done with it’.”

“Throughout secondary school if you had that idea, you’d just dismiss it, because we don’t do that. I didn’t take it seriously, it was a passing thought. It was first year of college that my cousin, who had a bigger chest than I did, got a breast reduction surgery done. I thought, ‘If she could do it, why can’t I?’ It dispelled the taboo a bit, I guess.”

Gráinne noticed the unspoken way which Irish people often have of burying a topic until somebody else is brave enough to unlock it.

“I hadn’t really thought about it, but that took away the wall up around it. The summer before I started second year in college, it was just getting to me. It affected everything in the way of confidence, everything I wore, playing sports just wasn’t a thing, I just felt vulnerable. My mum always compared it to wild games of tennis at Wimbledon, everything’s going the wrong direction. You’re very self-conscious about it. I was starting to get dints in my shoulders, I would have been 19 at the time so I couldn’t believe I could get them so young”

Gráinne discovered that she qualified for the surgery through the state on medical grounds, and her life greatly changed after that pivotal moment;

“I got my chest done September of 2015, so I would have been 19 when I started. I went to my GP about it, and he referred us. It was on medical grounds, I couldn’t straighten my back or stand for five minutes without a pain in my back because it just couldn’t hold my breasts. You feel like a hunchback all the time because you’re always bending over. I remember when I was going to the consultant, I was more nervous because I thought ‘If he tells me I can’t get this surgery, what am I going to do?’"

"I went in and found out I could have it on health grounds, and I was the right BMI for them to justify it. We had to wait for the insurance to approve it. The only funny thing was that they told me there would be scars. I never cared about this, I knew I could deal with them if it meant that I could have a smaller chest. To this day, I don’t care about the scars. They’re there, they’re fine, they’re healed.”

The process of the surgery itself is a journey, from the initial thought pattern, to the planning, to the operation itself and then recovery. Nobody takes on cosmetic surgery lightly, nobody does it on a whim or doesn’t think it through. They don’t think about ‘ruining’ their looks, or what other people think.

They have been on their journey for a long time, they are of sound mind, and they have ultimately made a choice and will handle whatever consequences arrive afterwards;

“Having the surgery itself, people would ask me if I was nervous. I kept telling people, ‘Why would I be nervous, I just have to lie there? It’s the doctor’s job.’ I wasn’t nervous, I was excited about it because it meant that so many other things were going to be open to me. When I finally got the surgery done, I was just ready for it. After the surgery, you had to have a week of bedrest to recover, and take care of yourself. It was fine, I had protein and scrambled eggs because the nurses said that it would help the healing of scars. I never put any kind of stress on it, I was always just excited about the chance to have it done. I can’t imagine what my life would be like without having it done, if I was still in the mental headspace of constantly being conscious of my chest like that.”

What changed in Gráinne’s life after her operation, and how does she feel today about it?

“It was just such a thing that you hid before. Everyone in my family had adapted to wearing big jumpers and scarves to hide it, we were a big chested family. I have no problem talking about my surgery, I have no problem talking about my chest size. I was never vulnerable about it, I kind of own it. Every year around the anniversary of my surgery, I think of it like a little victory. It’s an attitude, it’s another year on of not having to deal with my chest. People who knew me and knew how important it was for me were supportive."

"I wonder if there was someone who wanted implants for their chest, would it have been the same reaction? My flat chested friends always joked ‘I’ll use whatever you don’t want!’, I wonder if someone had gotten implants, would it have been the same reaction? Would people have been as supportive? Even if it was for their own mental health because they can’t stand being so flat-chested, I don’t think it would be as accepted.”

I asked Gráinne how her life changed after the surgery, in more than just a physical way;

“It definitely improved my mental health and the way I see myself. It’s made me more accepting of other parts of my body, of me as a whole. My physical health has also improved, I’m more active. I used to do so many after-school activities in primary school, but once my chest developed I stopped those. Sports bras didn’t improve it either. No one in my life ever commented on me having a big chest in a negative way to me, I don’t think. It was just something I wanted.”

Ariel Winter chose to have a breast reduction surgery following years of public and online ridicule, complications involving acting roles as well as intense back pain. Speaking about the difficulties to Glamour in 2015, she said;

“We live in a day and age where everything you do is ridiculed. The Internet bullies are awful. I could post a photo where I feel good, and 500 people will comment about how fat I am and that I am disgusting. On red carpets, I just said to myself, "You have to do your best to look confident and stand up tall, and make yourself look as good as you can in these photos," because everyone is going to see them. I definitely seemed confident; I'm an actress, that's what we do. But on the inside, I wasn't feeling so happy.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ARIEL WINTER (@arielwinter) on

For Gráinne, Ariel Winter’s story deeply resonated with her;

 “I saw her on Ellen, and just understood everything she said. You’re so self conscious of it. It would have affected my confidence going on Erasmus, I always hid behind scarves and jumpers. I’m far more confident now, and whether that was just growing up or having my chest done, I feel the chest was a major contributing factor. I’m still a curvaceous figure, but it’s manageable and I’m not weighed down by it. It wasn’t about anyone else, it was about me and no one else. If that’s what someone else wants, then they should go for it.”

When asked her opinion on Alexis Stone’s stunt, Gráinne was struck by the thought of going ‘too far’, and why that seemed to offend so many people. The idea that if you transform yourself to look less like the culturally accepted beauty standards, you are committing a grave sin in some way;

“For the whole Alexis Stone side of things, I think the problem with that was, did he go too far in people’s eyes? He didn’t fit with what society wanted him to look like. Kylie Jenner’s lips, she was self-conscious about them, and had been over-drawing, she got them done, but now we forget that she ever got them done. We accept that this is her face. But with Alexis, everyone thinks he went too far. People getting things like that done are often afraid of other people seeing their insecurities. There’s a model of what society wants people to look like, and you’re either reaching that model or you’re going too far."

Image: youtube.com

"Rachel Green in Friends, it’s so overlooked that she got a nose job, because it was to fix what they saw as a flaw. If Alexis Stone pretended to get work done for what he saw as a flaw, but society didn’t, then it’s a problem. Other people didn’t know about my chest, but I felt that it was a burden for myself and how I viewed myself. It was literally weighing me down. Kylie Jenner’s lips were a flaw to herself, and she ‘fixed’ them and she’s happy. It’s about ‘fixing’ what people’s perception of beauty is.”

What a large group of people perceive to be aesthetically pleasing offers a mirror to that society itself. Sociological factors have a major impact on why we see certain shapes, sizes, faces, skin types, hair and eye colours etc as the desirable way to look. Despite the fact that millions of young women ache to look the same as the Kardashians, it’s what is unique to each person that is the inherently beautiful part of them.

What's 'beautiful' today may be off-brand tomorrow. Why try to keep up?

As well as their appearance, their worth is so much more than what they look like or what they way. What they feel, what they offer to the world, their identities, their language, their flaws, their intelligence, their kindness; these factors are often greatly impacted by appearance, but beauty is more to do with the mind than what the eye envisions.

“Society has an issue with it if it’s pointing out flaws that they see in themselves as well. If you see something that you really admire in someone else, you feel self-conscious about it yourself in some way.”

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Cardi B has BITTEN BACK about her plastic surgery habits after certain members of the public called her lazy for cancelling gigs.

The notorious rapper had to cancel a few gigs due to her surgeries, and said it cost her millions of dollars to do so. However, we all know and love that Cardi snaps whenever anyone comes for her, so maybe don't do it?

Some of her followers accused her of laziness for getting procedures after giving birth to Kulture, but the Press artist kept her response brutally honest.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@iamcardib) on

Cardi B previously opened up about undergoing liposuction at a concert in Memphsis, admitting that she should have cancelled the show;

"I should have cancelled today. I shouldn’t really be performing because moving too much is gonna f*ck up my lipo. But b*tch, I’m still gonna get my motherf*cking money bag, let’s go!”

She later had to cancel shows this month, which led to online followers branding her as 'lazy' for not taking the time to work out. It's fair to say that Cardi put the haters in their place in her recent Instagram Live, they may never revive themselves.

"I hate cancelling shows because I love money. I’m a money addict…I get paid a lot of money, a lot of money for these shows. A lot of money. I’m cancelling millions of dollars in shows, but health is wealth so I have to do what I have to do.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@iamcardib) on

She also slammed anyone for trying to tell her what to do with her own physique, which we applaud. It's her money and her body, let the woman live her damn life in peace.

For the record, she said that she would have performed every show but her doctor insisted that she cancel them for the sake of her HEALTH, fam.

Speaking out against critics of her plastic surgery, the I Like It rapper said;

"I do whatever the f*ck I want to do with my body, I don’t have the time of day like you do. My job as an entertainer is a 24-hour job, bro. So no I don’t have time to work out. I wanted specific things that I know that no matter how much I work out won’t get fixed." Go off, sis.

Feature image: Instagram/@iamcardib

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What should have been an amazing 21st birthday celebration for Modern Family actress turned sour, when body-shaming trolls attacked her weight-loss.

The gorgeous actress posted a number of photos from her birthday bash, alongside her beloved boyfriend Levi Meaden, and the comments quickly became focused on her physique.

The images show Winter wearing a plaid jumpsuit, showing off her beautiful body, but trolls claimed her slimmer figure was because of plastic surgery.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@arielwinter) on

She captioned the post: "When you see the zankou chicken on the left turn right, and then you’ll be in Marina Del RAH. Happy 21st. Love you always, I couldn’t ask for a better day."

Comments have since been disabled on the series of snaps, after horrible social media users targeted her with hate. One said; "You’re losing your thick", referencing her famously curvy body.

"Healthier? She got work done to her face. She looked 'healthier' before,” one person wrote.

“Nothing wrong with being honest and telling her we liked her better before 'the change' she was so beautiful before she started chopping up her body and if me saying so helps one girl out there to feel beautiful who's thinking of surgery then its worth it,” another person added.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by (@arielwinter) on

The judgemental, harsh words prompted a response from Ariel herself.

“I appreciate you wanting to help girls love themselves the way they are, but you are also kind of cutting me down,” she wrote. 

“I also didn’t get plastic surgery. That is also not being supportive of women if you’re just assuming something about the way they look," she added. She's had to fight back the haters multiple times before:

She tweeted a few months ago: "My friend sent me the funniest article that's apparently in OK Magazine about my 'super strict diet' and how I only go out to eat if it's healthy food and I don't allow sugar in the house…I eat every carbohydrate possible…"

"I make chocolate chip cookies every week," she added. YES GURL.

Winter has long been the subject of criticism online, especially since her breast reduction surgery at the age of 17 and her choice of fashion.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ARIEL WINTER (@arielwinter) on

Earlier in January, somebody even suggested that she binges on drugs to lose weight; "Not half as bad as all the coke.meth she uses. She literally dropped 30 ponds." After correcting her spelling of pounds (thank God), Winter fired back.

“Yup… I dropped 30 bodies of water so fast…” she said. ”And yes!! My psychiatrist switched me from my previous antidepressant that didn’t work and made me gain weight, to coke/meth!! 

Her body shouldn't be attacked by random online users hiding behind a keyboard. Keep doing what you're doing Ariel, you're slaying the game and snatching wigs left, right and centre.

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Plastic surgery appears to be embedded in celebrity culture, especially among the infamous Kardashian family, with procedures such as lip injections, nose jobs, hip and bum implants, and boob jobs seemingly becoming the norm.

What has just come to our undivided attention however, is the rise of a new strange trend involving… wait for it… NIPPLE IMPLANTS. 

A recent New York Post video which involves a plastic surgeon explaining the rise of 'designer nipples' has come to light, and we're so shaken.

The video features an anonymous 28-year-old patient who is sitting in plastic surgeon Norman Rowe's exam room. The woman explains that she aspires to have nipples like Kendall Jenners:

"I love Kendall Jenner, and I love that she just doesn't wear a bra. You can't see her nipples, but you can see the pointiness."

"I think there's something really sexy and feminine about it," she says, lamenting the fact that her nipples never get hard.

"I think it would be really cool to just have protruding nipples all the time," continues. Rowe uses a hyaluronic acid-based filler to add volume to the nipples and to make sure that they can be seen through the woman's clothes.

Hydraulic acid fillers start at about $700 in price and usually last roughly two years. Rowe told Allure that cosmetic nipple procedures have been occurring for years;

"It recently became popular with patients desiring nipples like their favourite reality stars," he says. 

Patients also ask for "smaller areoles, smaller nipples, larger areoles, larger nipples, a change in colour or change in the shape of the areola, or any combination thereof," he says.

Darren M. Smith, another NYC plastic surgeon, prefers a different approach;

"I would generally guide patients towards a biocompatible implant-based solution as we have more control over this kind of procedure given the delicate nature of the surrounding anatomy,"

"I would exercise great caution before injecting fillers into the nipple as the risk of damaging these structures is real."

"Filler could clog milk ducts or inhibit blood supply to the nipple which could interfere with breastfeeding, sensation, or even damage the nipple itself."

Rowe, however, claims that the only risks involved are "getting too many compliments." Would you try it?

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It has come to our attention that women on Instagram are giving themselves nose jobs from wax alone, and we simply have to find out the suss.

We ended up discovering a whole new category of beauty videos online, and the before versus after images of these ladies will BLOW YOUR MIND.

Needless to say, these gals are stunning before and after, but the entire process of changing the whole face with wax is just too damn fascinating to look away.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Watiey Abdullah (@makeupbyasmawati) on

They literally change their eye colour, their bone structure, their noses and eyes with lashes, it's mind-boggling.

We are witnessing a total deconstruction of the face before our very eyes, people. This is science, don't even try to deny it.

"HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE?", we hear you gasp. Well, it's actually special effects face wax, not clay or synthetics at all. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ช่างแต่งหน้า Makeup & Hair (@aiammakeup) on

The newest trend has gone totally viral on social media, unsurprisingly. 

The amazing wax method originates from Asia, specifically in Chinese territories, where women have been using make-up to sculpt their faces with wax as part of their beauty regimen.

Ben Nye, an LA-based makeup manufacturer is one such company who make the DIY wax.

“You can change the shape of anything on your face, like the nose, brow bone, chin, etc., using a wax like Ben Nye Nose & Scar Wax,” professional makeup artist Lottie told Cosmopolitan.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Promise Tamang (@promisetamang) on

Now, sculpting your face with chunks of wax every morning as part of your make-up routine may not exactly be your vibe, but we guarantee some of your friends would agree to try this.

It's like an extreme form of contouring, how did they even think to try this?

It can't be denied that the videos are incredibly entertaining to watch, regardless of whether or not you'd try the trend yourself.

The rest of the world can now witness the glory of this magic, we owe Youtube and Instagram our lives for this.

Feature image: Makeupview.co

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Love Island’s Megan has opened up about her decision to have plastic surgery. The reality star has defended herself in an honest interview with Cosmopolitan UK.

She admitted that she didn’t get the procedures done to impress others, but for a much more empowering reason.

The former glamour model urged people to be less negative about plastic surgery, admitting she doesn’t think there is anything wrong with it.

“I think if you want to do something to make yourself more comfortable, then why not?” she said.

The 24-year-old stressed that she doesn’t consider herself a role model. “I did it for me and no-one else.”

Megan revealed that she has had a huge amount of procedures done in her life so far: "I got a boob job at 19, and had another one when I got older and had more money to upgrade the surgeon! And I had my nose done and my lips filled. And the teeth.”

The Love Island contestant said she has nothing to be ashamed of. She got those procedures done simply to boost her confidence: “I've done what I’ve done because it made me me feel confident and comfortable.”

Megan argued that society has no problem with women going to the hairdressers, nail salon or beauticians to boost their confidence, so what is wrong with her getting a procedure that makes her feel good about herself.

“I get my lips done because I feel better, it doesn’t have to be a massive deal,” she shared.

Megan came in fourth place in the Love Island finale on Monday night.

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Yes, you did read that heading correctly. 

Gone are the days of simple lip fillers and a cheeky boob job, apparently, because belly button plastic surgery is on the rise. 

That's right folks, people with innies and outties everywhere are getting their buttons transformed.

How though? WHY though? Let us explain. 

Darren Smith, a plastic surgeon in New York City, spoke to the gorgeous folks at Allure about the rise of the belly button procedures: "The belly button is a very important cosmetic feature of the stomach. I am seeing an increase in patient interest in belly button aesthetics."

So what goes on? 

Basically, it's exactly what you think! This type of surgery, known as umbilicoplasty, allows people to change the shape of their button – from an outtie to an innie, for example. 

The procedure can also repair your belly button after pregnancy or a piercing that went a bit wrong. 

 "People are also interested in restoring their belly button after pregnancy, abdominal surgeries, and after large amounts of weight loss," according to Melissa Doft, another New York based plastic surgeon. 

According to plastic surgeons, there are three main types of belly button-altering surgery: umbilicoplasty, umbilical hernia repair, and a classic tummy tuck.

An umbilicoplasty procedure changes the size and or shape of your navel. "Belly buttons that are 'too large' can be made smaller by removing extra belly button skin and tightening the bordering abdominal skin around the belly button."

belly dancing GIF

An umbilical hernia repair turns an innie out of an outtie. "This is a condition in which tissue, usually fat, protrudes through a small hole in the abdominal wall (comprised of connective tissue and the six-pack muscles) and makes the belly button bulge outward for a prominent 'outtie' appearance."

And with regards to tummy tucks, they usually come with naval procedures. "I see a lot of women who have had children who come in for a tummy tuck and this becomes part of the conversation."

There you have it now, the boom is back. 

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One downfall about the lure of the bright lights of stardom is the intense pressure to appear perfect in front of the camera, a pressure which has led many celebs to go under the knife to tweak their least favourite feature.

Katy Perry has been plagued by plastic surgery rumours since she burst onto the music scene one decade ago with I Kissed A Girl, and the star has opened up about the work she has had done. 

In an interview with Refinery 29, the singer said that while she has had filler work done on her face, she has not had any other augmentations.

'I've done lasers and got injections under my eyes for the hollowing—which I'd recommend for everyone who wants a solution for their dark circles—but all of my assets are real,' she revealed to the online mag.

'People tend to think they are fake, but it doesn't really matter,' she said, referring to her chest. 

In fact, while many would shun the notion of plastic surgery, Perry is open to the concept, as long as the reasons for going under the knife are right. 

'We're getting away from that negative stigma about physical alterations,' she explained.

'Of course, always be your authentic self—but if someone wants a nose job that makes them feel better, and they love their profile more because of it, it's like, go ahead.'

'Do whatever makes you feel better about yourself. Stay in therapy, but get it, girl.'

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It's safe to say that cosmetic surgery has been on the rise in the past number of years.

From boob enhancements, to botox, fillers and nose jobs, it seems like everyone and their mother has got something done these days.

And now, this could be the reason why.

According to Nuffield Council of Bioethics, the reason so many people are going under the knife is because of social media.

The report looked at what influenced young people to consider cosmetic surgery, and the contributing factors included, "increased use of the rating of images of the self and the body [on social media], for example through 'likes'; the popularity of celebrity culture, airbrushed images and makeover shows; [and] the huge growth in the use of social media."

We can all admit that we get a tad jealous when we see a gal with the perfect booty or boobs online, but does it affect us so much that we want to change ourselves?

Apparently, so.

Image result for boob implants

The report further stated that "advertising and marketing widely reinforce the belief that beauty is correlated with happiness and success.

"Women in particular are surrounded by the message that they have a duty to 'make the best' of themselves."

Are you surprised by these findings?

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Now, more than ever before, the discussion around body positivity and self-love is a part of our everyday lives.

It seems like everyday another influencer is coming clean about those seemingly perfect, but ever so staged Instagram pics, and we're constantly bombarded with campaigns telling us to 'love the skin you're in' and all that jazz.

So, why is it that the pressure to look a certain way still remains?

Well, even though the body positivity movement continues to grow, so too does the world of cosmetic surgery and enhancement – and an absolutely ridiculous procedure has just come to our attention.

You know that little bit of flesh between your bra strap and armpit? The one that literally every human being has? 

Well, a number of clinics are now offering a procedure to remove this 'unsightly' feature of your upper arm and have even gone as far as hailing it a 'revolutionary' treatment.

“As women, we are constantly striving to look better,” Dr Galyna Selezneva based at the Dr Rita Rakus clinic in Knightsbridge, London told The Sun.

“To lose weight and get rid of that awkward little pocket of fat which despite spending many hours in the gym, just won’t budge, ruining the perfect fit of our clothes.”

The method uses a laser light to heat the fat cells, which then leak into the patient's lymphatics.

The liver then processes the fat particles which are finally excreted from the body as waste.

Honestly, we're not even a little convinced. 

We'll take 'bra-bulge' over lasers any day. 

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Following her high profile split with cheating fiancé Nick Young, Iggy Azalea has adopted an enthusiastic approach to self-love.

Having recently declared her vagina “the best in the world”, late last week the Australian rapper took to Instagram to thank her plastic surgeon for her “fabulous nose and breasts” while wishing him well on his 43rd birthday.

Alongside a casual snap of Iggy and Beverly Hills’ Dr Ashkan Ghavami, the 26-year-old star wrote: “Happy birthday @DrGhavami It might seem obvious I’d hold the man I owe my fabulous nose and breasts to in high regard.”

“But vanity aside; Ash you’re hilarious as hell, talented, eclectic, a progressive thinker and someone who supports women in their choice to do what they want with their OWN bodies.”

The Fancy singer then pointed out how “tonnes of men” lack the understanding she credits Dr Ghavami with, before stating that she is “proud” to call him her friend.

Iggy has been praised on social media for speaking openly about the work she’s had done at a time when so many celebrities avail of cosmetic assistance while opting to deny that fact.

“So honest, I love it,” wrote one follower.  “Say it how it is girl #truthpatrol,” said another.

 

#GQMOTY

A photo posted by Iggy Azalea (@thenewclassic) on

 

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Earlier this year, Teen Mom OG’s Amber Portwood lost an impressive 40lbs by removing certain carbs and sugar from her diet.

But it seems the 26-year-old reality star’s body transformation did not end there, as she has now confessed to undergoing a “mommy makeover” on Twitter.

Last week, the Indiana native hinted that she was considering going under the knife in an attempt “to feel good again” after commenting on how her body was changed by pregnancy.

 

Love you guys..thanks for all the kind words

A photo posted by Amber Leann Portwood (@realamberlportwood1__) on

Days later, Amber – who gave birth to her now seven-year-old daughter Leah while filming 16 and Pregnant – confirmed that she had followed through with her plan to have surgery.

She tweeted: “Had my mommy makeover and I’m now in recovery.  If you want your post mommy body back or you’ve lost a lot of weight then I would recommend.”

While the author has yet to release post-surgery pictures, Wetpaint has suggested that a “mommy makeover” could involve liposuction and some form of breast lift.

 

Back in January, Amber’s MTV colleague Kailyn Lowry underwent her own “mommy makeover” by having a breast lift, liposuction and Brazilian butt lift, all of which she documented on Snapchat.

Amber has received support from her co-star Tyler Baltierra, who tweeted: “I’m happy for you!  Regardless…You ARE & ALWAYS will be beautiful Amber!  Me & Cate send our love & support.”

 

Feat image: MTV

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