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body dysmorphia

We can all acknowledge that Love Island can have a damaging effect on our mental health.

For one, we arguably lose a few brain cells any time we binge a series of it, but also the lack of diversity in the show is stark.

From racial issues to ridiculously high beauty standards and zero plus-size contestants, it can all be a bit draining.

A new poll conducted by professional marketplace Bidvine has now revealed that four-in-five people feel insecure when they watch the ITV2 hit reality show.

Let's face it, the show depicts scantily-clad stunners in bikinis and swimwear all day looking gorgeous, and rarely ever shows them eating.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Love Island (@loveisland) on

Presumably, there was pressure from producers and the show's bosses on the Islanders to maintain a certain weight and look when they entered the villa, which implies that finding love is purely for super skinny, athletic, bronzed beauties.

From an audience perspective, the show is as far from reality as it can get. 

The Bidvine poll also showed that one in eight respondents claimed they had looked up plastic surgery costs whilst watching Love Island.

73 percent said that they felt insecure about their body and 55 percent said the same about their face.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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53 percent of the programme's fans also said that they had looked up personal training costs, and 47 percent had searched for nutritionist services.

"Seeing chiselled bodies on Love Island and the summer months approaching, it is amazing to see how many people are seeking out fitness professionals,’ said Russ Morgan, Co-Founder of Bidvine.

Morgan warned that pursuing a healthy lifestyle needs to be done for the correct reasons, and not for body image issues.

Russ also elaborated on the value of seeing your own unqiue beauty;

"Don’t let a television show dictate how people “should” look and don’t work towards that unrealistic standard. Instead, pursue a healthy lifestyle and be confident in knowing that everyone is beautiful."

Since the show began on June 3, there has been a shocking 38 percent increase in personal training bookings through the professional marketplace and a 22 percent increase in nutritionist bookings.

The show's bosses caused outraged when quizzed on their lack of body diversity, after which they claimed the reason is because they "want people to be attracted to each other."

People of any look, race, gender or weight are attractive, there is no one standard of the perfect beauty ideal and the show is causing toxicity.

Make sure to take care of your mental health and be aware of how damaging insecure emotions can be as you focus on fitness. F*ck the 'summer bod' trope.

Feature image; Love Island/ITV

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The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil is now claiming that Khloe Kardashian has been "fat shamed into a prison of self-critique" following an Instagram post by the reality tv star.

Jamil is an ardent advocate of women's right and body positivity, and currently runs the i Weigh campaign to show women that their worth doesn't stop at their weight.

She is also a prominent speaker for banning airbrushing in the beauty industry, and refuses to allow photographers or magazine publications to edit her image.

The 32-year-old campaigns to end body dysmorphia, and has now focused on Khloe Kardashian for her repeatedly damaging messages aimed at young women.

The Keeping Up With The Kardashians star posted a message to her Instagram story which said: “2 things a girl wants: 1) Lose weight 2) Eat.”

Jamil screenshot the message and uploaded it to Twitter, writing "This makes me sad. I hope my daughter grows up wanting more than this. I want more than this. Sending love to this poor woman. This industry did this to her."

“The media did it to her. They fat shamed her into a prison of self critique. Dear girls, WANT MORE THAN THIS,” she concluded.

Jamil has previously criticised the Kardashian clan for their weight-loss product endorsements, which are essentially laxative meal replacements and possibly encourage body dysmorphia.

The former T4 presenter argues that the family capitalise from the insecurity of others, making money from “the blood and tears of young women who believe in them”.

Jamil attended the Golden Globes with her The Good Place co-stars last Sunday, where the show was nominated for best television series, and claimed she has no intentions of stopping her campaigning.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

She told the Press Association: “They’ll have to kill me to stop me talking out about the rights of women and minorities. It’s something I feel really passionately about I’ve been talking about it for years, I just didn’t have the platform that this amazing show has given me.

“I understand some people think I’m speaking out where it’s not my place, for groups who I don’t necessarily represent, or represent anymore, but I think someone has to say something," she added.

“And no-one listens to the people from marginalised groups so those of us with privilege have a duty to speak out so that their voices can be heard.” Dead right Jameela. You do you, gal.

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Indulging in numerous painful and botched cosmetic procedures since his teenage years, one Modern Family star has now opened up about his battle with body dysmorphia.

Reid Ewing, who plays the slightly dim but totally lovable Dylan, (Haley's on-off boyfriend) has said that he felt completely unattractive when he first arrived in Hollywood.

Indeed, he felt numerous cosmetic surgery procedures were the only way to secure a successful acting career. 

Writing a blog for the Huffington Post yesterday, the actor wrote that his obsession began when he moved to Hollywood in 2008 and that he started to get procedures at the age of 19. 

"I genuinely believed if I had one procedure I would suddenly look like Brad Pitt," he wrote.

Mr Ewing also criticised the four separate doctors who never once questioned his motives for going under the knife at such a young age. Indeed, he says they actually told him he would need some cosmetic surgery in order to be successful. 

"I told the doctor why I felt my face needed cosmetic surgery and told him I was an actor. He quickly determined that large cheek implants would address the issues I had with my face, and a few weeks later I was on the operating table.

“Of the four doctors who worked on me, not one had mental health screenings in place for their patients, except for asking if I had a history of depression, which I said I did, and that was that.”

Reid goes on to talk about the agony he went through while under taking the painful and life changing procedures.

“I woke up screaming my head off from pain, with tears streaming down my face. The doctor kept telling me to calm down, but I couldn't. I couldn't do anything but scream, while he and his staff tried seemingly to hold back their laughter.”

Borrowing money from his parents and grandparents to fund the procedures, Reid continued to get surgeries such as cheek implants and chin implants, the results of which he described as “horrendous”.

The treatments were ongoing throughout his stint on Modern Family – until he finally opted to seek help for his illness in 2012.

“I think people often choose cosmetic surgery in order to be accepted, but it usually leaves them feeling even more like an outsider," he added.

“Before seeking to change your face, you should question whether it is your mind that needs fixing.”

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