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An advert for lip fillers created by The Royal Tunbridge Wells Skin Clinic (RTWSkin) has been banned for supposedly encouraging young girls "irresponsibly" to get the cosmetic procedure.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) suggest that the ad insinuated that getting lip fillers are now "commonplace as getting your hair done", according to The Independent.

The advert, ran in Index Magazine, was targeted at young women and has been removed for normalising and presenting the cosmetic procedure as safe.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by rtwskin (@rtwskin) on

The ad read "Is your daughter taking an interest in lip fillers?" and claimed that the procedure was as common as a haircut.

RTWSkin director John Sheffield stated his surprise at the decision of the ASA to ban the advert; "I'm shocked at the attitude and conclusions". The ad drew complaints in October when it initially ran.

It stated: "Dermal fillers are very quickly becoming as commonplace as getting your hair done these days and even more so within the younger age group." It also wrote that mothers often bring their daughters in for the fillers.

It implied that parents are searching to "find somewhere safe and suitable" for their children's treatment, instead of saying no and pushing their daughters or sons to "go behind their backs, blindly searching for the cheapest practitioner without realising the risks".

According to the ASA, the ad made the impression that risks of lip fillers were associated only with unsuitable practitioners, and failed to illustrate the common risks of the surgery even with an experienced surgeon.

It added: "By presenting lip fillers as normal and safe… and something that responsible parents should support, the ad was irresponsible."

RTWSkin are claiming that a 20-year-old staff member wrote the ad, so was consulted about young women and their desire for altering their image.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by rtwskin (@rtwskin) on In a statement to the ASA, she stated her peer group was "vulnerable to the messages put out by reality TV shows and social media", and believed education and discussion of the topic was vital considering the amount of negative treatments being issued elsewhere.

Mr Sheffield said "many" young women and men attended the free consultation as a result of the ad, and about 30 percent of these people went for treatment. 

"In the vast majority of cases, we were able to satisfy the person that they did not need this procedure."

"We have received several commendations for our efforts to educate and were really quite shocked at the attitude and conclusions of the ASA."

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Instagram is increasingly being told to take responsibility for the harmful effects of it's site on the mental health of young people.

Between celebrities endorsing weight-loss products which have no scientific backing, the NHS encouraging body-negative adverts to be banned, and the new sensitivity screens being put in place to prevent graphic violence and self-harm being depicted; Insta is a dangerous place.

Yet, we cannot deny that selfie culture and self-branding through social media has become just a normal part of our everyday life. Me, myself and Instagram has taken over, and young people growing up today assume it's perfectly normal to try to look perfect.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@khloekardashian) on

It's so prevalent in society to share the highlights of ourselves and desperately emulate others who we assume have 'better' lives, which writers such as Matt Haig have emotionally discouraged.

FaceTuning images to blur seeming 'imperfections' such as stretchmarks, wrinkles, spots, freckles, teeth, smiles, body hair, even elbow wrinkles or unwanted curves is the new normal, according to our society.

Having flaws is deemed unhealthy, and the notion of 'narcissism' or vanity is no more.

Now Rankin is trying to counteract the idea of editing ourselves in a new photo series, and it's beautiful.

The amazing photographer is attempting counteract self-editing, by showing people just how damaging the effects of social media can be.  His photo series, aptly named Selfie Harm, was launched last week on Instagram.

The renowned artist captured portrait shots of 15 teens and handed power to them and their filter apps, asking them to edit the retouched image until they felt it was 'social media ready'.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by @rankinarchive) on

He commented;

“Social media has made everyone into their own brand. People are creating a two-dimensional version of themselves at the perfect angle, with the most flattering light, and with any apparent flaws removed.”

“This is a new, enhanced reality, a world in which teenagers can alter themselves digitally within seconds. Mix this with the celebrities and influencers flaunting impossible shapes with impossible faces and we’ve got a recipe for disaster," he attested.

The photographer shows images of youth and natural beauty which massively contrast with the newly filtered, edited versions. It's shockingly easy for the young models to blur the lines of reality, but what is 'perfect' in a world such as this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@rankinarchive) on

He wrote on Instagram;

“People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for the social media likes. “It’s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety and Snapchat dysmorphia."

"It’s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people’s self-image," he concluded.

The visible differences and changes made allow the teenagers and subjects to transform their entire identity, so much so that their natural state is completely erased. There are smaller noses, smooth complexions, wider eyes and lips, everything you can imagine.

Interestingly, the photographer notes that most of the models preferred their original image, but it's still disturbing to witness the power of filters. These edits can convince people that they're regular image isn't good enough to be seen.

It's becoming harder to discern what's real and what's fake; soon the idea of reality on social media could vanish altogether.

Feature image: Rankin Instagram/Fashionista

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What should have been an amazing 21st birthday celebration for Modern Family actress turned sour, when body-shaming trolls attacked her weight-loss.

The gorgeous actress posted a number of photos from her birthday bash, alongside her beloved boyfriend Levi Meaden, and the comments quickly became focused on her physique.

The images show Winter wearing a plaid jumpsuit, showing off her beautiful body, but trolls claimed her slimmer figure was because of plastic surgery.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@arielwinter) on

She captioned the post: "When you see the zankou chicken on the left turn right, and then you’ll be in Marina Del RAH. Happy 21st. Love you always, I couldn’t ask for a better day."

Comments have since been disabled on the series of snaps, after horrible social media users targeted her with hate. One said; "You’re losing your thick", referencing her famously curvy body.

"Healthier? She got work done to her face. She looked 'healthier' before,” one person wrote.

“Nothing wrong with being honest and telling her we liked her better before 'the change' she was so beautiful before she started chopping up her body and if me saying so helps one girl out there to feel beautiful who's thinking of surgery then its worth it,” another person added.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by (@arielwinter) on

The judgemental, harsh words prompted a response from Ariel herself.

“I appreciate you wanting to help girls love themselves the way they are, but you are also kind of cutting me down,” she wrote. 

“I also didn’t get plastic surgery. That is also not being supportive of women if you’re just assuming something about the way they look," she added. She's had to fight back the haters multiple times before:

She tweeted a few months ago: "My friend sent me the funniest article that's apparently in OK Magazine about my 'super strict diet' and how I only go out to eat if it's healthy food and I don't allow sugar in the house…I eat every carbohydrate possible…"

"I make chocolate chip cookies every week," she added. YES GURL.

Winter has long been the subject of criticism online, especially since her breast reduction surgery at the age of 17 and her choice of fashion.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ARIEL WINTER (@arielwinter) on

Earlier in January, somebody even suggested that she binges on drugs to lose weight; "Not half as bad as all the coke.meth she uses. She literally dropped 30 ponds." After correcting her spelling of pounds (thank God), Winter fired back.

“Yup… I dropped 30 bodies of water so fast…” she said. ”And yes!! My psychiatrist switched me from my previous antidepressant that didn’t work and made me gain weight, to coke/meth!! 

Her body shouldn't be attacked by random online users hiding behind a keyboard. Keep doing what you're doing Ariel, you're slaying the game and snatching wigs left, right and centre.

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What are your V-Day plans, gals? 

For many of us, it's pretty much the usual shebang of perusing ice-cream flavours in Tesco, and wallowing on the couch while feeling guilty as a feminist for wallowing on Valentine's Day. 

Ariana Grande is turning the single life into a trend, at least that's one comforting thing. Plus our pets give us more love than we even deserve.

Meanwhile, in Billionaire Boujee-land, Kylie Jenner is prepping for a new Kylie Cosmetics launch:

She appears to have gotten a red lady makeover, and we have to admit she's looking pure Poison Ivy-level glamour; serving Jessica Rabbit realness 24/7 just became her new niche.

We're assuming that this isn't Kylie's natural hair, seeing as the Kardashians can afford wigs, extensions, photoshop, stylists, fashion designers, celebrity hairdressers, etc.

Kylie's emanating Kim's Valentine's Day vibe form 2017, because the photographer responsible for this Kylie Cosmetics shoot also shot Kim's viral candy hearts campaign in 2018.

Image: Instagram/@kimkardashian

While Kim's hairdo is a lighter shade of pastel-coloured pink, Kylie has gone all-out pillarbox red.

Which do you prefer? We're feelin' Kylie's wavy, short hair because it's Moulin Rouge vibes to the max.

She'll be releasing the new collection on February 1, stay tuned.

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Beauty means something different to everyone. An episode of Sherlock I distinctly remember had the protagonist declare while giving the Best Man’s speech at a wedding; “Beauty is a construct based entirely on childhood impressions, influences and role models.”

At the time, I was roughly 16 years old, obsessed with changing absolutely everything about my appearance. During my school days, everyone wanted to look the same.

The same tanned skin, bright blonde hair which is pretty much only natural if you are of Scandinavian descent, contoured cheekbones and slender figure with a waistline that most likely requires a corset to maintain.

Being different was not only seen as unattractive, it was even feared.

It was only when I entered college and saw beauty expanding its traits that my eyes were opened to different types of aesthetically pleasing looks. As well as this, I began to understand that confidence is beauty.

Happiness is beauty, intelligence is beauty, generosity is beauty. And that beauty is often the least interesting thing about a person.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by rupi kaur (@rupikaur_) on

However, the ideal of beauty which had been prominent during my secondary school years remained the same until the Kardashians exploded onto the reality TV scene, and over the course of the last decade have altered the idea of beauty as we know it.

With their bum and breast implants, nose jobs, cheek implants, lip fillers, whitened teeth among other procedures I don’t have the vocabulary to describe, somehow the idea of what was beautiful drastically changed.

Body modification became far more normalised, as well as the fact that social media gave audiences the power of knowledge.

While celebrities were undoubtedly changing their faces and bodies for decades, especially ones on our cinema and TV screens, social media and the internet now gave us the tools to recognise when ‘work’ had been done.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Consultant Clinic (@consultant_clinic) on

One fascinating case which has attracted massive public attention in the last few weeks is that of Elliot Joseph Rentz, otherwise known as Alexis Stone.

The make-up and drag artist garnered public furore after revealing a massively drastic surgical transformation to his large social media following, uploading reveal videos to his YouTube channel which were bombarded with negative comments spewing hateful language and even death threats.

Rentz began the process on August 1 of last year, explaining to his following in a video;

“I don’t want to look the way I look today. I don’t connect with what I see. I never have. So I’m changing it all. I’ve been called crazy. I’ve been called botched. I’ve been called an addict. I’ve been called ugly. I’m told every single day that I’ve ruined my face,” he claimed, emphasising that every last cent he owned would be given to his surgical dream of metamorphosis.

“You name it, I’m having it done,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Alexis uploads a video titled “The Reveal”, which has since racked up over 450,000 views. In the diary-like visual film, the drag artist shows off his brand new face, which included fat grafts to his nose, forehead, and chin, as well as chin and cheek implants and an eye lift.

“This had nothing to do with vanity and everything to do with sanity,” he quotes, directly from Pete Burns’ biography.

One month later, Rentz uploads a compilation of comments, each more vicious and negative than the next. Some of them are hard to read.

Stone later claimed his so-called friends and family members often joined in on the vitriolic, with some people even telling him to take his own life, and that his ex-boyfriend committed suicide because of Stone.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alexis Stone (@thealexisstone) on

Roll on January 1 2019, and Stone reveals in a lengthy YouTube documentary that the whole six-month journey was a complete hoax – his new ‘botched’ face was a complex mask.

Working with Academy Award-winning makeup artist David Marti, a stunt mask was even developed from prosthetic facial materials to be worn outside of the house. Months of effort and secrecy had led to this, and the result was fascinating.

He referred to the stunt as a social experiment, while others called it a cry for mental health help, an attention seeking performance or even a show of disrespect for those who have undergone extreme surgery themselves for whatever reason.

So why did he do it, and what did his social experiment show about society’s idea of beautiful versus ‘botched’ surgery?

Ireland’s perception of the cosmetic surgery industry is vastly different from the reality.

Dozens of clinics have popped up all over the country – Westport in County Mayo is even the predominant creator and exporter of the world’s botox – and yet there is an element of hushed secrecy to the entire organisation.

It is rare to find an Irish person who opens up about having plastic surgery, we are a country of people who lament so-called ‘narcissism’, yet self-confidence issues remain potent within our society.

In a society that profits from self-doubt, liking yourself is an act of rebellion.

Jameela Jamil has frequently found herself in the public eye for her scathing indictment of the Kardashian family, arguing that their world is one which 'recycles self-hatred'.

Yet the reality TV clan have essentially transformed the perception of beauty over the last decade, morphing women into self-obsession with curves, plumped up lips, tanned skin and bodycon clothing.

“You’re selling us self-consciousness,” she claims, portraying her deep disappointment of the ‘double-agents to the patriarchy’. Her main issue with the Kardashians is their weight-loss product endorsements, which are basically a fancier packaging for laxatives in protein shake form.

The family have abundant riches which can afford the best photoshop, photographers, airbrushing, personal trainers, stylists, dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons the world can offer.

Even a glance over websites aimed at young women such as Boohoo, Missguided and PrettyLittleThing shows the huge changes in the beauty industry.

Their models have hyper-miniscule waists and voluptuous curves, glossy brunette locks, tanned skin and full lips, highly reminiscent of the Kardashian family’s idea of what beauty means.

The #10YearChallenge has proven at least one thing; those who have money have a greater control over their appearance than those who don’t.

Body modification has become normalised in society, whether it’s permanent or semi-permanent. Contouring, filters on our social media apps, airbrushing, make-up tutorials on YouTube and cosmetic surgery all reflect the culture we live in, which constantly tells us what we look like isn’t enough.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Muriam Waseem (@muriamwasi) on

And yet, if a person who changes their appearance is genuinely happier and finds improvement in their mental health and self-esteem as a result of body modification, who are we to judge their lifestyle choices?

Choice is the vital word here. Our society and law consistently shows that it believes it possesses the right to control other people’s bodies. Specifically female bodies.

If another person has the funds and is of sound mind, shouldn’t they be allowed to alter their body if it sparks joy in them, to reference the iconic Marie Kondo?

What struck me most was the understanding which the public has for those undergoing body modification for the sake of their physical health.

Whether it’s a nose job for aiding breathing, a breast reduction surgery to alleviate back pain or even just braces, the level of support appears to be significantly higher when physical health is taken into account, rather than perceived vanity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by River Medical (@rivermedical) on

Yet if a person’s mental health is suffering as a result of their appearance, is this not still a health reason? On an ‘extreme’ level, is transitioning from a male or female gender to the opposite biological sex classified as body modification?

In this case, a person’s mental health would presumably suffer as a result of their appearance, should they not identify with who they see in the mirror.

Cases of body dysmorphia are higher than ever in Ireland, obsession with one’s flaws can cause great emotional pain. Yet we fixate on the reasoning for a person’s body modification, we presume we have the right to judge them for their choices.

SHEmazing spoke to a young woman named Gráinne, who underwent breast reduction surgery at the age of 19, and never looked back. She was plagued with back pain throughout her secondary school years, but the daily toll which her chest took on her confidence and mental health was the final straw;

“For my own personal experience I would say, I think my chest came in in like first year when I was 13, and got bigger after that. I’d say it probably crossed my mind, a chest reduction every once in a while. You’d be trying on clothes and things just wouldn’t fit, whether it was bikini or swimsuits or whatever, I couldn’t buy clothes that fit. You’d be thinking, ‘just chop them off and be done with it’.”

“Throughout secondary school if you had that idea, you’d just dismiss it, because we don’t do that. I didn’t take it seriously, it was a passing thought. It was first year of college that my cousin, who had a bigger chest than I did, got a breast reduction surgery done. I thought, ‘If she could do it, why can’t I?’ It dispelled the taboo a bit, I guess.”

Gráinne noticed the unspoken way which Irish people often have of burying a topic until somebody else is brave enough to unlock it.

“I hadn’t really thought about it, but that took away the wall up around it. The summer before I started second year in college, it was just getting to me. It affected everything in the way of confidence, everything I wore, playing sports just wasn’t a thing, I just felt vulnerable. My mum always compared it to wild games of tennis at Wimbledon, everything’s going the wrong direction. You’re very self-conscious about it. I was starting to get dints in my shoulders, I would have been 19 at the time so I couldn’t believe I could get them so young”

Gráinne discovered that she qualified for the surgery through the state on medical grounds, and her life greatly changed after that pivotal moment;

“I got my chest done September of 2015, so I would have been 19 when I started. I went to my GP about it, and he referred us. It was on medical grounds, I couldn’t straighten my back or stand for five minutes without a pain in my back because it just couldn’t hold my breasts. You feel like a hunchback all the time because you’re always bending over. I remember when I was going to the consultant, I was more nervous because I thought ‘If he tells me I can’t get this surgery, what am I going to do?’"

"I went in and found out I could have it on health grounds, and I was the right BMI for them to justify it. We had to wait for the insurance to approve it. The only funny thing was that they told me there would be scars. I never cared about this, I knew I could deal with them if it meant that I could have a smaller chest. To this day, I don’t care about the scars. They’re there, they’re fine, they’re healed.”

The process of the surgery itself is a journey, from the initial thought pattern, to the planning, to the operation itself and then recovery. Nobody takes on cosmetic surgery lightly, nobody does it on a whim or doesn’t think it through. They don’t think about ‘ruining’ their looks, or what other people think.

They have been on their journey for a long time, they are of sound mind, and they have ultimately made a choice and will handle whatever consequences arrive afterwards;

“Having the surgery itself, people would ask me if I was nervous. I kept telling people, ‘Why would I be nervous, I just have to lie there? It’s the doctor’s job.’ I wasn’t nervous, I was excited about it because it meant that so many other things were going to be open to me. When I finally got the surgery done, I was just ready for it. After the surgery, you had to have a week of bedrest to recover, and take care of yourself. It was fine, I had protein and scrambled eggs because the nurses said that it would help the healing of scars. I never put any kind of stress on it, I was always just excited about the chance to have it done. I can’t imagine what my life would be like without having it done, if I was still in the mental headspace of constantly being conscious of my chest like that.”

What changed in Gráinne’s life after her operation, and how does she feel today about it?

“It was just such a thing that you hid before. Everyone in my family had adapted to wearing big jumpers and scarves to hide it, we were a big chested family. I have no problem talking about my surgery, I have no problem talking about my chest size. I was never vulnerable about it, I kind of own it. Every year around the anniversary of my surgery, I think of it like a little victory. It’s an attitude, it’s another year on of not having to deal with my chest. People who knew me and knew how important it was for me were supportive."

"I wonder if there was someone who wanted implants for their chest, would it have been the same reaction? My flat chested friends always joked ‘I’ll use whatever you don’t want!’, I wonder if someone had gotten implants, would it have been the same reaction? Would people have been as supportive? Even if it was for their own mental health because they can’t stand being so flat-chested, I don’t think it would be as accepted.”

I asked Gráinne how her life changed after the surgery, in more than just a physical way;

“It definitely improved my mental health and the way I see myself. It’s made me more accepting of other parts of my body, of me as a whole. My physical health has also improved, I’m more active. I used to do so many after-school activities in primary school, but once my chest developed I stopped those. Sports bras didn’t improve it either. No one in my life ever commented on me having a big chest in a negative way to me, I don’t think. It was just something I wanted.”

Ariel Winter chose to have a breast reduction surgery following years of public and online ridicule, complications involving acting roles as well as intense back pain. Speaking about the difficulties to Glamour in 2015, she said;

“We live in a day and age where everything you do is ridiculed. The Internet bullies are awful. I could post a photo where I feel good, and 500 people will comment about how fat I am and that I am disgusting. On red carpets, I just said to myself, "You have to do your best to look confident and stand up tall, and make yourself look as good as you can in these photos," because everyone is going to see them. I definitely seemed confident; I'm an actress, that's what we do. But on the inside, I wasn't feeling so happy.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ARIEL WINTER (@arielwinter) on

For Gráinne, Ariel Winter’s story deeply resonated with her;

 “I saw her on Ellen, and just understood everything she said. You’re so self conscious of it. It would have affected my confidence going on Erasmus, I always hid behind scarves and jumpers. I’m far more confident now, and whether that was just growing up or having my chest done, I feel the chest was a major contributing factor. I’m still a curvaceous figure, but it’s manageable and I’m not weighed down by it. It wasn’t about anyone else, it was about me and no one else. If that’s what someone else wants, then they should go for it.”

When asked her opinion on Alexis Stone’s stunt, Gráinne was struck by the thought of going ‘too far’, and why that seemed to offend so many people. The idea that if you transform yourself to look less like the culturally accepted beauty standards, you are committing a grave sin in some way;

“For the whole Alexis Stone side of things, I think the problem with that was, did he go too far in people’s eyes? He didn’t fit with what society wanted him to look like. Kylie Jenner’s lips, she was self-conscious about them, and had been over-drawing, she got them done, but now we forget that she ever got them done. We accept that this is her face. But with Alexis, everyone thinks he went too far. People getting things like that done are often afraid of other people seeing their insecurities. There’s a model of what society wants people to look like, and you’re either reaching that model or you’re going too far."

Image: youtube.com

"Rachel Green in Friends, it’s so overlooked that she got a nose job, because it was to fix what they saw as a flaw. If Alexis Stone pretended to get work done for what he saw as a flaw, but society didn’t, then it’s a problem. Other people didn’t know about my chest, but I felt that it was a burden for myself and how I viewed myself. It was literally weighing me down. Kylie Jenner’s lips were a flaw to herself, and she ‘fixed’ them and she’s happy. It’s about ‘fixing’ what people’s perception of beauty is.”

What a large group of people perceive to be aesthetically pleasing offers a mirror to that society itself. Sociological factors have a major impact on why we see certain shapes, sizes, faces, skin types, hair and eye colours etc as the desirable way to look. Despite the fact that millions of young women ache to look the same as the Kardashians, it’s what is unique to each person that is the inherently beautiful part of them.

What's 'beautiful' today may be off-brand tomorrow. Why try to keep up?

As well as their appearance, their worth is so much more than what they look like or what they way. What they feel, what they offer to the world, their identities, their language, their flaws, their intelligence, their kindness; these factors are often greatly impacted by appearance, but beauty is more to do with the mind than what the eye envisions.

“Society has an issue with it if it’s pointing out flaws that they see in themselves as well. If you see something that you really admire in someone else, you feel self-conscious about it yourself in some way.”

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The fierce Lena Dunham is fighting for women everywhere, one nude photo at a time.

The influencer celebrated the nine-month anniversary of her hysterectomy with gorgeous photos of her body.

Posted on Instagram, her revealing portraits exposed the rawness of her painful experience over the past few years in a way that has resonated with women everywhere.

“I’ve never celebrated the 9 month anniversary of anything and I realized last night why that number feels so funny- I won’t ever do it the way I planned to.

“My body is mostly healed and every day I find a new bruise on my heart, but today I offer myself gratitude: from the most pained place, I somehow knew to choose myself.” 

 

Today is National Leathercraft Day, National Relaxation Day and National Lemon Merengue Pie Day. It’s also the 9 month anniversary of my hysterectomy. I’ve never celebrated the 9 month anniversary of anything and I realized last night why that number feels so funny- I won’t ever do it the way I planned to. My body is mostly healed and every day I find a new bruise on my heart, but today I offer myself gratitude: from the most pained place, I somehow knew to choose myself. The purest glint of who we are and know we can be is always available to us, calm and true at our center. My friend Paul named my uterus Judy, and when she was being uppity we called her out, hence the tattoo on my ribs, which hurt like fuck even through the pain meds: #RIPJudy. Today I give thanks for Judy, for her graceful exit and for this body, which is stronger than I’ve ever given it credit for. Happy Giving Birth To Myself Day.

A post shared by Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) on

The American actress was diagnosed with endometriosis, a condition where cells of endometrial-like tissue migrate outside of the uterus and attach to other places in the body.

These cells are structured to break down and bleed, but they cannot escape through a period if mislocated. This results in extreme pain that varies as hormone levels change, according to Endometriosis UK.

The condition affects one in ten women in the UK, and along with agonising pain, it often causes infertility.

After three hospitalisations within a year, Lena was unable to bear the terrible symptoms any further and decided to undergo a hysterectomy. She wrote about her life-changing experience in a moving letter.

“All along the way, a massive fear of mine was ‘being discovered,’ that someone would decide I wasn't strong enough for my work or my life because of what I dealt with physically and emotionally. But I am strong because of what I've dealt with.”

 

A post shared by Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) on

Now, the Girls star is reflecting on endometriosis in honour of her hysterectomy anniversary with a powerful statement.

“The purest glint of who we are and know we can be is always available to us, calm and true at our center,” she said in celebration of her health. Lena urged women to remember, no matter what we are going through, that we can always find ourselves through the pain and trauma. Somewhere buried under all that hardship is a strong and powerful woman capable of digging herself out.

The actress explained her friend named her uterus Judy, and Lena has a tattoo in tribute to her lost, physical symbol of womanhood that reads ‘RIP Judy’.

“Today I give thanks for Judy, for her graceful exit and for this body, which is stronger than I’ve ever given it credit for. Happy Giving Birth To Myself Day.”

But the courageous actress is clear to convey that a woman's femininity does not lie in her levels of estrogen or her functioning uterus. It is defined by her strength to carry on and fight for her true self to shine through whatever obstacles life throws her way.

Lena continues to be a bold advocate for women’s health and openly sharing about her chronic condition has helped raise awareness of endometriosis and it’s painful symptoms.

“I am no longer scared of my body,” she declared. “In fact, I listen to it when it speaks. I have no choice but to respect what it tells me, to respect the strength of its voice and the truth of my own.”

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Ah, HERE now.

Back dimples are cute and everything but would you really put yourself through surgery just to have them? 

Some women are.

Image result for back dimples miley cyrus

Yep, just when we thought we reached peak-cosmetic enhancements; back dimples are coming up in the trend books and we don't know what to think.

Apparently, Venus dimples, as they've been coined, are a sign of good health and a good sex life (what?), so if you have them, you're a lucky sucker.

According to Cosmo, some people are fishing out five grand for them already and that price is expected to grow.

What will be next? *Sighs*

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Another day, another crazy fan theory.

There has been quite a few rumours going around since Kim Kardashian was robbed at gunpoint in Paris, and the latest one is nothing short of crazy.

After Kris and Rob shared snaps of Kim on Halloween, one fan claimed online that the robbery was just a cover-up for getting a butt reduction.

 

She fixed her botched butt with a 'robbery' lie .

A photo posted by THIS IS UR BACK-UP  (@roastkardashian) on

Many more added to it, saying she had a "tummy tuck" too, and another one even goes on to suggest she had numerous surgeries while being out of the public eye.

An Instagram account, @roastkardashain, shared a pic of Kim from a few months ago, and another one from the side on Halloween.

While her bum does look smaller, there honestly could be a million reasons for it. She's standing at a different angle, her costume is hiding her bum, or hey… maybe she's just been working out?

Fan theories need to calm themselves.

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For the most part, when celebs have surgery they keep it on the DL, but not Kerry Katona.

The mum-of-five took to Twitter today to tell her fans she's recovering from liposuction and a tummy tuck.

She wrote: "Well I’ve been recovering from having a s**t load of lipo!! #dontjudge!! 5 kids and all!! And a mini tummy tuck!Just a kick up the arse x."

She then followed that tweet with: "Don’t wanna be the fat cat in the kittens! can’t wait to get back in gym!!"

One fan responded to her saying there's no harm "in a bit of plastic surgery," to which Kerry replied: "It's like going for an eye test these days! How very showbiz."

What do you think of Kerry's decision to be so open?

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When little Henry Dolan was born premature five months ago he weighed just 2lbs. 

Indeed, his mother, Mollie, now admits that she didn't expect her baby to live for longer than a few days.

"But God had other plans," she said in the last week – highlighting that Henry is currently a robust 11lbs.

Still, his short few months, much of which have been spent in hospital, have been unimaginably difficult – not ony for him but for his parents Mollie and Sam too. 

Over the weekend, however, Henry's family were finally given some good news: the heart that he needed to survive had been donated.  

Undergoing surgery at the Children's Hospital in St Louis in the last few hours, Mollie and Sam made the incredible and inspiring decision to live-blog the ups and downs of their son's surgery.

Some of the footage – which they are sharing via the Hope For Henry Facebook page – is even being taken by the little one's surgeons from inside the operating theatre. 

Incredibly, video and photos posted to the page's wall include those showing Henry's old heart after removal. 

The Dolans hail from Annandale in Minnesota in the US and they welcomed their son into the world on May 2.

With the outcome of such a hugely complicated procedure being anything but certain, Mollie admitted this morning that she was spending precious time 'snuggling' her gorgeous son.

Thankfully, in the last hour some good news has been shared: although mum and dad had yet to be reunited with their child, he has out of surgery and seemingly is doing well.

Posting a video of "Henry's perfect beat to his new heart," Mollie added: "The surgeon just came in to visit with us. They're all finished. He said everything went according to plan, with no surprises."

She continued: "We are still having a little issues with rhythm. He has a temporary pacemaker until things settle out!

"God is good. Thank you Jesus!"

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We all know that reality stars come in for whole host of abuse at the hands of keyboard warriors.

And while some force themselves to rise above it, not everyone is capable of turning a blind eye to the insults they receive on a daily basis.

Opening up about her response to online trolling, Geordie Shore star, Sophie Kasaei, admitted that the taunting became so bad, she turned to cosmetic surgery to silence her bullies.

Speaking to new! magazine, the reality star explained that a particular period in her life had caused her to drop multiple dress sizes – weight loss which Twitter users felt compelled to call her out on.

"When I lost the weight last year people were tweeting us saying l looked like a Space Raider crisp, like an alien," Sophie admitted.

Explaining that the comments left her feeling insecure over her appearance, the reality star admitted that she had sought the help of professionals, adding: "So I got fillers in my face and under my eyes."

Sophie dropped to a size 8 last year while suffering from stress.
 

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Earlier this year, Teen Mom OG’s Amber Portwood lost an impressive 40lbs by removing certain carbs and sugar from her diet.

But it seems the 26-year-old reality star’s body transformation did not end there, as she has now confessed to undergoing a “mommy makeover” on Twitter.

Last week, the Indiana native hinted that she was considering going under the knife in an attempt “to feel good again” after commenting on how her body was changed by pregnancy.

 

Love you guys..thanks for all the kind words

A photo posted by Amber Leann Portwood (@realamberlportwood1__) on

Days later, Amber – who gave birth to her now seven-year-old daughter Leah while filming 16 and Pregnant – confirmed that she had followed through with her plan to have surgery.

She tweeted: “Had my mommy makeover and I’m now in recovery.  If you want your post mommy body back or you’ve lost a lot of weight then I would recommend.”

While the author has yet to release post-surgery pictures, Wetpaint has suggested that a “mommy makeover” could involve liposuction and some form of breast lift.

 

Back in January, Amber’s MTV colleague Kailyn Lowry underwent her own “mommy makeover” by having a breast lift, liposuction and Brazilian butt lift, all of which she documented on Snapchat.

Amber has received support from her co-star Tyler Baltierra, who tweeted: “I’m happy for you!  Regardless…You ARE & ALWAYS will be beautiful Amber!  Me & Cate send our love & support.”

 

Feat image: MTV

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