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Pregnant supermodel Ashley Graham is being praised for showing off her stretch marks in a beautiful photo.

The American catwalk star is pregnant with her first child, and posted the image to her Instagram followers.

She captioning the shot; “Same same but a little different." Fans were hugely appreciative of her 'real' honesty and body positivity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ashleygraham) on

The image was liked by celebrities such as model Lily Aldridge and comedian Niecy Nash. Author Rebecca Scritchfield commented;  “We need this!!! Beauty and real ness.”

31-year-old Ashley has become renowned for her inspiring activism surrounding the topic of body confidence, and her plus size model career has skyrocketed.

She announced last week that she was pregnant with her first child with husband Justin Ervin in a stunning video;

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ashleygraham) on

The announcement came on Graham's ninth wedding anniversary with husband, after posting the video about her growing family;

"Nine years ago today, I married the love of my life. It has been the best journey with my favourite person in the world!

"Today, we are feeling so blessed, grateful and excited to celebrate with our GROWING FAMILY! Happy anniversary, Justin. Life is about to get even better."

Feature image: Instagram/@ashleygraham

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Irish model, foodie blogger and fitness expert Roz Purcell has posted a message that, we think, everyone needs to read today. 

Purcell has been a long-standing agent of body positivity, having suffered with the pressure to have the perfect body presumably for her entire modelling career.

With Love Island on our screens for the next eight weeks judging physiques and placing emphasis on the Greek God image of bronzed and toned bodies, it's important to remember that they are only displaying a miniscule picture of reality.

The vast majority of the country does not fit into their notion of an 'ideal' body type, and their lack of body diversity and racial diversity is fairly shocking.

Roz expressed her own views in an Instagram post, and we love her for it:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@rozannapurcell) on

She captioned the lengthy post:

"Few things. Love Island is hitting our screens tonight; let's remember its a selective representation of the female body and I would say the pressure they must feel to live up to the ”perfect body” before entering the reality TV SHOW world is horrible.

"The fact they HAVE to wear bikinis all day until they are allowed put clothes on for the evening. The stress," she added.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@rozannapurcell) on

She continued, opening up about her moment of clarity on the beach;

"Went to go for a swim today and obviously with the weather it was jammers  I think about the fear I used to have (sometimes still get) about stripping off into a swimsuit/ bikini, walking past people feeling just shit and insecure about my stretch marks, cellulite jiggly bits. Walking backwards into the sea."

"It was the fear of what people thought more so than what I thought about them." Fear holds a huge amount of us back from enjoying our holidays, and it's not fair.

Image: iNEws

"What to remember when I feel like this…. No one cares or notices and if they do, if they care about my bits (that are not part of this perfect image portrayed by society) then they're dicks.

"You deserve to run about in a swimsuit, jump in the sea, dip in the pool, not be bleeding boiling on holidays. Don't let anyone tell you different (even your own head )." Roz concluded.

She's dead right. While we can all enjoy reality television if we want, we have to recognise that it's about as far away from reality as possible.

Body confidence takes time and energy, but figure out what empowers you. If Love Island makes you feel self-conscious or down, it's time to switch off.

Feature image: Instagram/@rozannapurcell

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One of the UK's most senior doctors, Professor Stephen Powis, has written in The Telegraph that weight loss advertisements which are celebrity-endorsed should be banned.

Professor Powis is currently the NHS' medical director, and has criticised well-known celebrities such as the Kardashians for promoting weight-loss products and aids such as teas, shakes and pills on social media, and has even called for Instagram to oppose them.

The doctor referenced the troubling statistic that more than one in 10 young people are affected by mental health issues in the UK, and are heavily influenced by body insecurity and famous faces encouraging them to lose weight.

He emphasised that mental health issues are one of the "most pressing issues facing out country".

SHEmazing recently wrote about the level of profit which people like the Kardashians can gain from the insecurity of their fans. 

Poor messaging can lead to dangerous consequences, and numerous organisations such as the National Eating Disorder Association have branded the Kardashian family’s representation of weight loss products as ‘triggering’ for those who struggle with eating disorders.

Professor Powis made sure to emphasise that impressionable young people look to these people for lifestyle guidance; "At what is already a sensitive and important time in their development, this group is especially vulnerable to pressures which trigger or exacerbate mental ill health," he writes.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#ad You guys all know I looove @flattummyco shakes. I've just restarted them (it's Day 2 today) and I’m already feeling so good. We had a huuuuge Christmas this year and between that, New Years and everything inbetween… I felt like it was impossible to fit in my regular work outs and eat healthy. But this program is giving me a kick in the right direction that I need. These meal replacement shakes are so good and they're helping me get my tummy back to flat. I’m already feeling amazing and I’m so excited for the next few weeks. Because they’re all about getting women back on track… they’ve got a 20% off sale going on right now, so if you want to start 2019 off right… trust me, you’re going to want to check them out. PS. I’m doing the chocolate program

A post shared by  (@kimkardashian) on

A shocking HALF of young girls say that they feel under pressure to lose weight, the doctor says that social media's ascension has escalated this pressure and both celebrities and the platforms themselves must take responsibility for their posts.

"Our young people are bombarded with ideas, images and advertising which set such a high bar for what they should feel and look like," he writes. "And yet there is little accountability for the impact this has.

"Where celebrities and the platforms which promote them exploit this vulnerability by pushing products like laxative teas, diet pills and other get-thin-quick solutions, they are taking the health of our young people in their hands and should act with far greater responsibility."

Activist and actress Jameela Jamil tweeted her support for Professor Powis:

Prof. Powis also suggested that practical measures should be taken to stamp out the 'exploitation' of youth, such as online platforms "banning adverts for products with a known health risk". YAS KING.

He argued that the NHS is working on understanding and treating mental health conditions in young people;

"Everyone, especially those engaging with young people like social media firms, and celebrities who profit from them, have a duty of care to do more for our health and wellbeing".

"The NHS can't keep putting out fires if some parts of society keep lighting matches," he concluded, using a pretty effective allegory. 

Kim Kardashian West has an especially long history of promoting weight loss products on social media, as well as her sisters, Kylie and Kourtney. Kim faced backlash in May for promoting appetite suppressant lollipops on her Instagram.

One of the world's most powerful women was literally telling other women and young girls NOT TO EAT.  The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil founded the i Weigh body positivity social media movement and Kardashian West "a terrible and toxic influence on young girls".

Jamil has consistently called out celebrities including Cardi B and Iggy Azalea for promoting 'detox' teas, claiming they're just selling digestion problems instead.

She also called Kardashian 'an agent of the patriarchy', for her incessant need to 'recycle self-hatred.'

Jamil herself experienced an eating disorder as a teenager, and skipped meals for years at a time. She spent money on "miracle cures and laxatives and tips from celebrities" which later left her with "digestion and metabolism problems for life".

The Competition and Markets Authority has announced a clampdown on celebrities who don't label their posts as promotional advertisements, but solid rules aren't in place.

NHS England's national mental health director Claire Murdoch expressed concern over the influence which these celebrities have young people at an "impressionable" stage in their lives.

"Both the celebrities themselves and these social media companies themselves should be more responsible," she told BBC Breakfast.

We're so glad the NSH are finally using their influential platform to steer people in the right direction. Time will tell what type of future diet fads will hold, but they're looking highly unpopular right now.

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Body-shaming is still massively prevalent in our society, without question.

Despite the cold, hard fact that it's 2019, people still feel the incessant need to pull others down for their appearance, and their weight.

Loey Lane is a well-known, GORGEOUS, experienced YouTuber who just so happens to be plus-sized. She speaks about it regularly, preaching the value of health above self-hatred and dieting.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

15-25. One is miserable in her own skin, chased the high of seeing a lower number on the scale every time she stepped on. She was overcome by her own demons. One is confident and in love with her own body. She told those demons to fuck off.  Turned off the comments because random people who have no idea who I am don’t know how to act lol. It has nothing to do with weight. It has everything to do with the fact that I hated myself for a long time because of the way I looked, and now everything I do is out of self love. I go to the gym because I love myself, not because I hate my body. I eat healthier because I want to feel good in my own skin. I take better care of myself now than I ever did eating 500 calories a day.

A post shared by(@loeybug) on

The vlogger has now released a shocking video of a diet pill company using footage of her as part of their horrendously shameful advertising campaign.

After returning from a sportswear photoshoot with iconic make-up guru James Charles, the model discovered a video selling diet pills which utilised images of her as their 'before' template, and she's understandably fuming.

CarbonFire 213 Complex makes it ridiculously difficult to find reviews of it online, but the video proclaims the product to be a certified miracle for anyone who wants to lose weight.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Diet pills have entered the media for an assortment of reasons over the last few years, with activists and public figures such as Jameela Jamil slamming weight-loss products which do more harm than good.

The Kardashians are renowned for selling appetite suppressants and weight-loss consumer goods, much to the dismay of many body positivity figures and health experts alike.

There are an array of dangers associated with items such as these, which are essentially glorified laxatives.

The advertising campaigns in the media are arguably as harmful, telling women their weight creates everyday problems such as finding a husband, having failing health and being embarrassed to look in the mirror.

Loey Lane shows the video advert to her following, and it's one of the worst examples of body-shaming we've seen yet. It opens with a beautiful, pale-skinned blonde woman gazing at silk wedding gowns, after her friend asks her to be her maid-of-honour for a wedding.

"How I Fit Into My Wedding Dress" is the video's apparent title, despite the fact that it's NOT HER WEDDING. The problems aren't hard to spot throughout the disgraceful imagery.

gary payton wow GIF by NBA

 The blonde woman looks into the camera lens, and the words; "Believe me, I wasn't always this way. This was me before losing all that weight," flash across the screen.

Lo-and-behold, the woman is now Loey Lane, allegedly the same person as the blonde woman.

Alright then, at this stage we've lost count of the issues within the video, and it's only about ten seconds in.

As if the ad itself isn't traumatising enough to watch, actual graphics for OTHER diet pill companies and body-shaming articles pop up on the side of the screen. An assault is what that is.

"I'm going to share my secret so that it can be easy for you!" the advert claims. Thank God for that.

"A few months ago, one of my best friends from high school texted me. She was getting married and she wanted me to be her bridesmaid. I was SO excited, but there was just one thing… I was SO overweight," the video continues. Wow.

"I couldn't go to the wedding like this, I was so pretty in high school and I would be so embarrassed looking like this. I wanted to go to the wedding and look like I did when I was 18. You know- slim, pretty, looking great in some heels." *Sharpens pitchfork*

"I cut out all junk food. I worked out every single day. After four months, I was still embarrassed to look in the mirror…my personal trainer friend said if I wanted to lose weight fast, I had to supercharge my metabolism."

Classic *insert scientific words here to fumble the consumer's brain* tactics. 

"At this point I was desperate…time was running out." This isn't dismantling a bomb, you won't die if you attend your best friend's wedding at ANY weight.

oh my god omg GIF by TV One

"How could I show my face at the wedding looking like this?" Looking like.. a human woman? *Gasp* "I was even considering not showing up." Priorities aren't in order there, love.

"CarbonFire Complex claimed to boost metabolism using only the healthiest ingredients, they looked very professional." Yes, and Donald Trump looks very diplomatic.

"After only a few days, I dropped a dress size. Ten days later, I lost two dress sizes. I felt lighter on my feet." Because your digestive system has just wasted away, perhaps?

oh my god wtf GIF

"After another week, I was down three sizes. By the time the wedding came around, I lost seven dress sizes. I was getting a LOT more attention from guys, I almost felt bad for the bride, because I was getting so many compliments."

Male attention should be the motivational factor for every woman, after all. 

This all comes at the reasonable price of ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS, by the way. You can buy happiness, male sexual attention and confidence all at this lovely sale.

The blonde woman in the video revealed herself as Amanda John, and she also did not consent to be used for the branding.

So they effectively stole imagery from two women without their permission and used it to scam vulnerable, hard-working people online with low self-esteem because of ads exactly like this, shaming their weight. As if a weighing scales can tell you your worth.

We hope Loey Lane and Amanda John take legal action against CarbonFire Complex, Lord knows they deserve it.

A reminder, there is no such thing as a magic pill. Your worth encompasses your hopes, fears, intelligence, beliefs, morals, family values, friends, career and everything in between, not just your appearance alone.

You can't lose weight and discover joy at the end of the scales.

Take a look at Loey Lane's original video below for some fresh morning rage;

Feature image: @loeybug/Instagram

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The X-Factor isn't on many of our 'To Watch' lists anymore, despite the fact that it used to be one of the most influential shows on ITV.

An old clip from the show has resurfaced and is causing a LOT of drama , mainly because of Simon Cowell's fat-shaming contestants.

The video went viral after one Twitter user found a clip from the show's early days which highlights the RELENTLESSLY harsh comments given by the judges.

In the clip, a newlywed named Samantha auditions for a place on the star search show, and faces absolute abuse from the judges at the time; Simon Cowell, Louis Walsh and Sharon Osbourne.

Sharon says; "I think you have a lovely face and a lovely voice," after Louis refers to the singer as "mission impossible."

Though Samantha is eventually voted through to the next round of The X-Factor, Sharon tells her to "go on a diet" after Simon wonders what she's "willing to do." WHAT?

Another Twitter user reminded the internet of how ruthless the music industry was during those years, claiming "Adele wouldn't have stood a chance of making it even with her amazing voice."

(That's just plain nonsense, Adele could change the WORLD with one single note.)

Other social media users reacted with outrage at the clip, claiming to be "shaken" by the harsh comments, which Simon earned fame for.

We think Samantha is gorgeous inside and out, we hope she's happy and confident wherever she is.

.confidence damn i look good GIF

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The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil is now claiming that Khloe Kardashian has been "fat shamed into a prison of self-critique" following an Instagram post by the reality tv star.

Jamil is an ardent advocate of women's right and body positivity, and currently runs the i Weigh campaign to show women that their worth doesn't stop at their weight.

She is also a prominent speaker for banning airbrushing in the beauty industry, and refuses to allow photographers or magazine publications to edit her image.

The 32-year-old campaigns to end body dysmorphia, and has now focused on Khloe Kardashian for her repeatedly damaging messages aimed at young women.

The Keeping Up With The Kardashians star posted a message to her Instagram story which said: “2 things a girl wants: 1) Lose weight 2) Eat.”

Jamil screenshot the message and uploaded it to Twitter, writing "This makes me sad. I hope my daughter grows up wanting more than this. I want more than this. Sending love to this poor woman. This industry did this to her."

“The media did it to her. They fat shamed her into a prison of self critique. Dear girls, WANT MORE THAN THIS,” she concluded.

Jamil has previously criticised the Kardashian clan for their weight-loss product endorsements, which are essentially laxative meal replacements and possibly encourage body dysmorphia.

The former T4 presenter argues that the family capitalise from the insecurity of others, making money from “the blood and tears of young women who believe in them”.

Jamil attended the Golden Globes with her The Good Place co-stars last Sunday, where the show was nominated for best television series, and claimed she has no intentions of stopping her campaigning.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

She told the Press Association: “They’ll have to kill me to stop me talking out about the rights of women and minorities. It’s something I feel really passionately about I’ve been talking about it for years, I just didn’t have the platform that this amazing show has given me.

“I understand some people think I’m speaking out where it’s not my place, for groups who I don’t necessarily represent, or represent anymore, but I think someone has to say something," she added.

“And no-one listens to the people from marginalised groups so those of us with privilege have a duty to speak out so that their voices can be heard.” Dead right Jameela. You do you, gal.

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Irish model is living it up in Bali for the festive season, but took the time to pen an empowering message to her Instagram followers about self love – specifically, the importance of accepting your stretch marks.

Roz detailed how she originally thought her stretch marks were cool as a pre-teen, but society's beauty standards quickly changed how she viewed them as she grew older and her body continued to change. 

'I remember the first time I noticed my stretch marks probably like 11 or 12, I was like i don't remember my cat scratching me,' she wrote, jokingly. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

'A few months of noticing more and more I was like this is so cool I have all these reptile markings no one else has & showing them off.

As i grew up, went to secondary I realised it was something I shouldn't think was so cool or show, no one in magazines had them I never noticed them on anyone else, it was not normal or considered beautiful.'

'Even now it’s rare you see an unedited photo in a magazine I'm like how is that girls butt so smooth.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

Roz admits that only recently has she become confident enough to wear clothing that reveal her stretch marks without worrying about what other people think.

'It hasn't been until now the past two years I can confidently walk passed someone in a bikini or shorts and not cringe inside thinking that they're probably looking at all my stretch marks and cellulite,' she wrote. 

'Maybe it's age( most likely) but you realise if someone is doing that they're 1. A nob 2. A nob. Stretch marks are normal, we all have them, big or small they're part of me & they're here to stay!'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

Roz also detailed that she would not be trying to get rid of her stretch marks any time soon despite that being advised to her.

'Got a few replies on stories early like you know what you need to do to get rid of them ”x, y&z” sorry babes I don't have time or the dedication to massage my but in some super oil for 30 mins before bed sure I’d slip out onto the floor,' she sassed. 

Faire dues to Roz for speaking out about stretch marks – particularly at a time like Christmas when people are certainly feeling more aware of their bodies ahead of the anticipated societalhealth kick of January

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Instagram has become the go-to place to find body positive activists doing their thang and spreading the love. 

Michelle Elman is one such activist, who fills her page with quotes, photos and inspiration for those looking to love themselves a little more.

People flock to Michelle's page for body-positive affirmations, and she reminds her followers that while she is happy in herself, there is no true secret to being body positive. 

 

A post shared by Michelle Elman (@scarrednotscared) on

Michelle took a step outside of the usual narrative, to remind followers that body positivity is a journey. 

'Well I'll tell you the secret… there is no secret. Yes there are things to learn, and mindsets to shift but there is no "secret". There is no quick fix.'

'It's a bunch of small baby steps that unfortunately you never got to see along the way because I didn't have an Instagram account when I was going through them. In fact, Instagram didn't exist. I was 15 when I was going through exactly what you are going through now.'

 

A post shared by Michelle Elman (@scarrednotscared) on

'It was just luck of the draw, that I went through it early. It is just lucky that I was so overwhelmed by diet culture that I screamed "STOP" younger.

'I know most of you look at my page and want to be where I am now but to those of you who are new to this, please listen to me when I say 1) You are not going to get there overnight 2) You can not rush the process 3) It won't be a linear uphill journey. 4) There will be some days where you question if you made any progress whatsoever 5) It is worth it 6) The process is part of the fun.'

 

A post shared by Michelle Elman (@scarrednotscared) on

'Body positivity is an action. You do it ever single day. You do it when you stop yourself right before you are about to mention a diet. You do it when you intervene on body shaming. You do it when you look in the mirror and tell yourself how much you love you, even when you don't want to. You do it when you stop a fat girl in the street to tell her how amazing she looks.'

'What you put into body positivity, you get out of it. This is not an online movement. This is a real life, let's f*****g accept everyone's bodies and while we are at it, love ourselves movement,' she finished.

While pretty quotes are ideal for a little boost, Michelle's real and raw depiction of journeying to self love really hits home. 

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Loose Women's Stacey Soloman has been sharing snaps from her holiday with her two kids on Instagram and they are amazing.

Why, you ask?

Because she's documenting her real body on the social media platform by putting up several pictures of her enjoying the sun, sans filter.

Currently on holidays with her two son's – Zachary, ten, and six-year-old Leighton, whom she had with previous partners, Stacey treated us to a few real pictures. 

On one snap, she wrote, ''no filter needed. Loving my extra fold over tummy lines this year, they look like a six pack wahoo! Winning! Happy hump day xxx.''

The photo was welcomed by many people, who praised Stacey for showing what real bodies look like.

One wrote, ''I love that you don't filter your photos and are just comfortable being yourself. You look amazing!''

Another photo revealed  that things aren't always as picture-perfect as they appear on social media.

She posted a picture of herself on a boat, wind blowing her hair,  and not a thigh-gap in sight.

 

Classic stand on the front of a boat pic! Smashed  it. they don’t call me Stacey Sexy Solomon for nothing

A post shared by Stacey Solomon (@staceysolomon) on

She captioned it, ''classic stand on the front of a boat pic! Smashed it. they don’t call me Stacey Sexy Solomon for nothing.''

People were quick to comment on how naturally gorgeous she looked, without any editing.

One comment said, ''simply gorgeous!! Love your pics and how you are so proud of your body. We all come in different shapes and sizes and should all be proud xx'' while another wrote, ''Stacey you are an inspiration to all woman no filters nothing the way everyone should be you look amazing.''

How refreshing is to see tummy rolls? Stacey is proper beach-body inspo.

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At a time when Instagram has set up some very unrealistic lifestyle and body expectations, it#s refreshing to hear a strong female role model speak out against social media comparisons and body positivity. 

Irish beauty Roz Purcell has taken to her page to share with her 225,000 followers her thoughts on feeling insecure in an online world.

After sharing on her Instagram story that she was moving past feeling insecure about stretch marks and cellulite, Roz shared more of her personal insights into body positivity and breaking away from the virtual world to focus on the real one. 

 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

'I know I went on a little rant about social media yesterday and I think all of you agreed that sometimes you end up putting down your phone feeling shit about yourself.'

'It happens all of us and it’s so important that if that happens you take time to tell yourself that you are worth more & comparing yourself to someone from little tiny snippets of their life isn’t realistic.'

'Social media is great in a lot of ways and we need to remember why it started to be social with people – of course people are mostly going to post the good stuff that’s going on and you have to remember that.'

 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

Roz outlined how she makes mindful time in her day without social media. 

'I set this challenge over on stories this morning and it’s something I do 1-2 times a week. I have to reach somewhere before I check any social channels…before I click on Instagram,' she said. 

'It lets me decide how I start my day rather than going on social straight away and seeing posts that might or might not end up making me feel crap.Take that time for you and stop to rub all the dogs you pass.'

'For a lot of us our insecurities are based on what others might think of them – ***k that no one gives a shit and if they do “its cliche” but it really is their problem. We can get really caught up in our flaws.'

Highlighting her own insecurities, the model explained that she has spend years hating parts of her own body, before realising that acceptance of our bodies is a key component to health and wellbeing. 

 

A post shared by ROZ PURCELL (@rozannapurcell) on

'I’ve spent years hating parts of me – which sounds silly cause it’s part of me and it’s not going anywhere so you have to stop and learn to love them,' she wrote. 

'I remember I used to moan about my legs all the time being bigger than my sisters until my mum said- you need to stop and think of the positives sure aren’t they great legs for cycling and I was like yeahhhh you’re right they are.'

We'll be taking a tip from Roz and ditching our data usage before 9am . 

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Working out may be the last thing on your mind when you're feeling a bit down on yourself, but research has suggested that even a small about of exercise can have a hugely positive effect on a woman's body image.

A study published this month in the journal, Psychology of Sport and Exercise, found that just 30 minutes of exercise left women feeling slimmer and stronger afterwards.

Researchers gathered 75 college-aged women who said they were unhappy with their appearance in order to test exercise's effect on body positivity.

Participants were given a questionnaire that asked about their exercise habits, energy and stress levels, as well as how they felt about their appearance and how much they enjoyed working out.

The group were then divided in two, with one half instructed to exercise on a stationary bike for 30 minutes, while the other half sat in a room reading a National Geographic magazine.

When the 30 minutes were up, the participants repeated the questionnaire directly after the workout, and then again 20 minutes later.

Interestingly, the women who worked out showed signs of improved body image in both questionnaires when compared to those who didn't.

The authors of the study reckon that the positive effect could last beyond the 20 minutes mark – although they did not test for that.

What's more, the results could suggest that physically active people have better self image, regardless if there's a change in their appearance.

The study adds to the growing body of research that indicates exercise can have a positive influence on a person's mental health and body acceptance.

So, the next time you find yourself in need of a little confidence boost, why not get that heart rate going?

You'll feel better in more ways than one.

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Instagram is flooded with images of airbrushed perfection, and while society is certainly waking up to the fact that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes, there is still along way to go when it comes to celebrating beauty diversity. 

One Insta influencer who is helping the movement along is Ariella Nyssa, an Aussie-based beach babe whose feed is absolutely stunning.

Ariella recently uploaded an Instagram picture highlighting the differences between what we see as we scroll through our feed, and what's actually a reality. 

 

A post shared by Ariella Nyssa (@_aariellanyssa) on

'When I first saw the photo on the right I had negative thoughts almost straight away. “I’m not putting that photo up”' she wrote. 

'But when I compared these two pictures I realised just how important it is to post it. What you guys don’t see behind Instagram photos is the 300 other images that didn’t ‘make the cut’.'

'The in between shots where you test out different poses, angles and wait for the perfect lighting.'

 

A post shared by Ariella Nyssa (@_aariellanyssa) on

'The photo on the left I posed my body to an accurate degree to emphasise my body shape, the sun was out from a cloud and my body looks smoother.'

'The photo on the right is a natural stance, my posture is shocking and all of my lumps and bumps are out on display.'

'This is reality and I think it is so important to love these photos and love my body in ANY form, ANY lighting and ANY pose. So no I’m not going to delete this photo, im going to show off the things that make my body mine!'

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