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The first ever law on ending violence and harassment in the working world at the International Labour Conference (ILC) in Geneva is being negotiated by governments, trade unions and employers.

ActionAid is addressing the issue, demanding that all parties agree to a strong, binding treaty which protects women and marginalised workers.

The organisation has now released the findings of a survey in order to gain awareness about the ILC conference and the extreme importance of laws to protect women.

Just 37 percent of Irish people who participated knew that there is zero laws a an international level to eliminate workplace gender-based violence and harassment

82 percent of those surveyed said that they care about the conditions in the factories where their clothes are made, but 65 percent claimed it's hard to know which brands are ethical.

82 percent of consumers in Ireland stated that if a clothing brand was exposed to in the media because its clothes are made in factories where women experience sexual violence and harassment, they would refuse to shop there.

28 per cent of Irish people believe that governments are responsible for making sure that clothes are produced in an ethical way. This would mean that, in factories, workers are paid a living wage, work in safe conditions and are free from sexual violence or harassment. 

38 percent however claimed it's the employer's responsibility. The global  justice organisation also gathered data from 200 garment factory workers, including 181 women, in the capital city of Bangladesh.

80 percent of the workers claimed they were subjected to sexual harassment and/or abuse at work.

ActionAid have heard shocking stories of colleagues sexually assaulted on the factory floor, women abused for not meeting targets and losing their job for being pregnant. 

72 percent of garment worker respondents said they had been subjected to extreme verbal abuse at work.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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73 per cent of Irish consumers wouldn’t work in a place where workers face gender-based violence, according to ActionAid, and 80 per cent would say no to working in unsafe buildings. Yet garment workers in Bangladesh face these dangerous conditions on a daily basis, and it's not headline news.

The Rana Plaza tragedy killed over 1,100 people just six years ago, but all garment workers surveyed still reported some level of concern over safety in the workplace.

90 percent stated that their jobs were impacting their own health, such as eyesight, injured hands and feet, exhaustion, depression and severe back pain.

CEO of ActionAid Ireland, Siobhan McGee, said;

“The #MeToo movement has brought the issue of sexual violence and harassment at work to the fore. But, the most vulnerable, marginalised and underpaid workers cannot be left out.

"Governments and employers now have the opportunity to act by voting in favour of the first international law to tackle gender-based violence in the world of work."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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“Right now, 59 countries still have no national laws against violence and harassment at work, and so a progressive, binding, global treaty is the only way to protect women and other marginalised workers," McGee continued.

“Our research shows that the majority of Irish consumers believe it is the responsibility of governments and brands to protect workers in global supply chains, such as the garment industry.

“Consumers, hit by austerity measures and rising global inequality, face tough choices when the only clothes they can afford are cheap, fast fashion that puts garment workers at risk of abuse. It’s up to brands and governments to ensure that the decision to buy ethical clothing is not only a choice the rich can make.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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One woman, Shopna, has been a garment worker for 16 years and now operates a sewing machine. She has experienced many unwanted sexual advances over the years, and witnessed incidents of assault on other women by powerful men.

Shopna unfortunately faced harassment from an inappropriate factory manager, who repeatedly asked her to stay back after work, but she said no. He violently attacked her after she came into work earlier than other workers.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Natasha Krelle

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Infamous R&B star R Kelly has left the Chicago jail where he was being held after posting his $100,000 bail, according to a Cook County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman.

The singer has been plagued by allegations of sexual assault, rape, child abuse, child pornography and aggravated criminal sexual abuse for decades.

Yesterday, the 52-year-old pleaded not guilty to 10 charges against four women, three of whom were minors at the time of alleged assault. He did not speak to media as he was escorted from jail by his lawyer.

The Ignition singer turned himself in to police on Friday and spent the weekend in a jail cell after denying all allegations against him over the last 30 years.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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He has faced claims of sexual abuse for a long time, even appearing on trial in 2008 for child pornography charges but was acquitted. 

Cook County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari confirmed on Monday night that R Kelly had raised the $100,000 bail, which was 10 percent of the $1 million bond set by a judge.

It is suspected that he struggled to raise the $100,000 necessary, and that a female "friend" had to assist him.

His court appearance and plea has arrived only weeks after Surviving R Kelly aired on Lifetime; an explosive documentary series about the allegations of continuous assault from dozens of women, including his former wife.

He is currently being tried for sexual assaults which apparently happened from 1998 onwards. He met one of the four women on her 16th birthday at a restaurant, and another 16-year-old when she asked for his autograph.

Robert Sylvester Kelly was ordered by the court to hand in his passport, and to have zero contact with anyone under the age of 18. He is scheduled to appear in court on March 22.

The well known high-profile women's rights attorney Gloria Allred claimed in a news conference yesterday that she is now representing over six women who allege that the singer abused them.

Feature image: Instagram/@swit9jablog

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Two more women have come forward to accuse R&B singer R Kelly of sexual misconduct, dating back to when they were 15 and 16 years old.

The latest allegations are the newest in a string of claims against the singer going back three decades, spanning child pornography to sexual, emotional and physical abuse and holding women captive in a sex cult.

The duo spoke out against the notorious artist at a press conference with infamous women's rights lawyer Gloria Allred yesterday.

Both women allege that the sexual misconduct happened in 1995 after they attended an R Kelly and LL Cool J concert in Baltimore, Maryland.

One of the ladies said she was just 16 years old and living in the city when her and a 15-year-old friend, the other alleged victim, attended the concert.

They went to an after-party at a nightclub, and Kelly pointed to the two girls and asked his staff to put them onstage. They were also offered drugs and alcohol at the party, they claim.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The woman said Kelly asked the two girls to meet him in his hotel suite, and that he entered the room wearing jeans and a white t-shirt, with his penis “out and over the top of his pants”.

Apparently, Kelly asked both girls to dance and he ended up lying on the bed with them, telling them they could be in his next music video.

Next, the singer began touching the young woman's breast and genitals, and asked the pair to engage in a threesome. Her friend said no and went to the bathroom.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The woman said Kelly requested oral sex from her, which she did, and then he had sexual intercourse with her.

She had been under the influence of alcohol and marijuana that had been given to her at the after-party, and alleges she “did not have the capacity to consent”.

In Maryland, the age of consent is 16. The two women never saw R Kelly again.

Despite the huge range of allegations against the singer, his lawyer Steve Greenberg denied all accusations against Kelly, saying he has never knowingly had sexual relations with underage women.

Feature image: @dramaclubpod/Instagram

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The trailer for the new Michael Jackson documentary, Leaving Neverland: Michael Jackson and Me, has been released and it's more than a little uncomfortable to watch.

Scenes of allegations of sexual abuse against children emerge, detailing interviews with two men; Wade Robson and James Safechuck, who claim to have been sexually assaulted by the King of Pop as kids.

Leaving Neverland will air on Channel 4 from March 6, and is an exhausting four hours long series of footage and testimony. 

In the trailer, which is 40 seconds long,  Wade says of Michael Jackson;

"He said, “Do you and the family want to come to Neverland?” ‘He was one of the kindest people I knew and he also sexually abused me. I was seven-years-old."

Wade Robson was seven-years-old at the time, and James Safechuck was 10. Both detail abuse at the hands of Michael Jackson at his Neverland Ranch.

“It’s undeniably a kind of true-life horror movie,” Variety’s review of the documentary read. “You walk out of it shaken, but on some level liberated by its dark exposé… Devastating.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Michael Jackson (@michaeljackson) on

The Hollywood Reporter wrote that the programme is; “Complicated and heartbreaking. It’s doubtful you’ll feel exactly the same after watching.”

“The sheer variety and volume of horrifying disclosures made here… make Leaving Neverland both riveting and grueling, impossible to turn away from and the definition of a tough sit.”The Los Angeles Times wrote.

The first trailer was released this morning ahead of its launch on HBO in the US and Channel 4 in the UK on March 6, and the documentary premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Premiers on HBO in March (@leavingneverlandofficial) on

The interviews with the now adult Robson and Safechuck and their mothers as they try to process their trauma are incredibly powerful. Robson’s mother especially struggles to deal with just how complicit she was in the alleged abuse.

“Secrets will eat you up, you feel so alone,” Safechuck says at one point.

“Jackson told me, if they ever found out what they were doing he and I would go to jail for the rest of our lives,” Robson says. “I want to be able to speak the truth as loud as I had to speak the lie for so long.” 

The Dan Reed-directed two part docu-series has been plagued with controversy since January, when it debuted at the Sundance Film Festival. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Premiers on HBO in March (@leavingneverlandofficial) on

The Jackson estate has slammed the documentary, disavowing the claims;

 “This is yet another lurid production in an outrageous and pathetic attempt to exploit and cash in on Michael Jackson,” a statement from the estate read.

“This so-called ‘documentary’ is just another rehash of dated and discredited allegations. It’s baffling why any credible filmmaker would involve himself with this project.”

Jackson’s brother Jermaine added: “Just leave us alone, leave him alone, let him rest, please. He deserves to rest.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The filmmakers of Leaving Neverland have responded to the criticism of their work by stressing how vital it is to listen to survivors of abuse;

In a statement, director Dan Reed said: “If there’s anything we’ve learned during this time in our history, it’s that sexual abuse is complicated, and survivors’ voices need to be listened to. It took great courage for these two men to tell their stories and I have no question about their validity."

"I believe anyone who watches this film will see and feel the emotional toll on the men and their families and will appreciate the strength it takes to confront long-held secrets.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Speaking to Variety, Dan Reed added that the documentary is not about Jackson;. “This is not a movie about Michael Jackson abusing little boys,” Reed said.

“It’s a movie about two families and how two families came to terms with what their sons revealed to them many years after Jackson died.”

Jackson had always vehemently denied any allegations of abuse. Legal proceedings were brought against him in 2005, but Jackson was acquitted on all counts of child molestation, child intoxication and conspiracy to kidnap a child.

Feature image: rttnews.com

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Women's Aid have launched a new guide on safety orders for young women who are experiencing abuse in their relationships, due to new laws being introduced.

The legislation brought in at the beginning of this year allows women who are going through dating abuse to apply for Safety and Protection orders.

Women's Aid are instigating the guide on Valentine's Day as part of the #TooIntoYou campaign to emphasise the darker side of love.

RTÉ's Can't Stop Dancing presenter Bláthnaid Treacy is also urging young women and men to "know the signs of dating abuse", especially because 60 percent of abuse in relationships begins before the age of 25.

Women's Aid are a national organisation which provides vital information and support to women experiencing dating abuse and domestic violence. Their #TooIntoYou campaign aims to spread much-needed awareness on the topic.

#TooIntoYou uses social media and poster advertising to strive for the spread of information from February 14 until March 8 (International Women's Day).

New laws brought in at the start of 2019 under the Domestic Violence Act 2018 allow women to apply for important Safety and Protection laws.

However, the organisation believes that many young women are still in the dark about the change and how to get the necessary protection, which is why Women's Aid ae bringing in the 'Guide to Safety Orders in Dating Relationships' online today.

Spotting the 10 key danger signs of dating abuse and providing information to combat online stalking and digital abuse is of imperative importance for women in Ireland today.

Margaret Martin, Director of Women’s Aid says:

"1 in 5 women in Ireland experience abuse in relationships and in a national survey on domestic abuse in Ireland, almost 60 percent of those who had experienced severe abuse in intimate relationships first experienced it when they were under the age of 25."

"A stark reminder of this risk is that 1 in every 2 women, aged between 18-25, killed in Ireland since 1996 were murdered by their boyfriends or exes," Martin concluded.

The campaign is being launched on Valentine's Day to highlight the hidden reality of many young women's relationships, despite the fact that today is traditionally associated with love and romance.

Martin's goal for today, is to ask the hard questions; "We are clearly asking – what part of love is abuse?" She spoke directly to victims and survivors; “You are not alone in feeling something isn't right with your relationship."

Visit the #TooIntoYou website here for more information, or call the Women's Aid 24hr National Freephone Helpline at 1800 341 900.

Feature image: Instagram'/@womens.aid

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R&B singer R. Kelly has just announced a worldwide tour, despite the extensive abuse allegations against him going back three decades.

The world's most notorious musician's alleged predilection for engaging in sex acts with underage girls is the subject of a new documentary, Surviving R Kelly.

The series has rocked the entire world, watching the sheer scale of claims made against him over such an extended amount of time.

Kelly has consistently denied all the accusations of sexual misconduct, rape, emotional, physical and sexual abuse and holding women captive in a sex cult. He has also threatened to sue Lifetime for airing the docu-series.

The singer has an album, Trust, coming out soon and has dropped new music for his 'Day One Fans' on January 1.

Streams of his music has shockingly increased since more allegations were released to the general public, with numerous celebrities slamming his actions and treatment of black women.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by R Kelly (@rkelly) on

R Kelly's alleged abusive treatment hasn't been a secret for the music industry; he even went on trial for child pornography back in 2001 but was acquitted of all charges despite a large amount of evidence against him.

It was also rumoured that he physically abused R&B singer Aaliyah, and it's been reported that he married her when she was just 15-years-old by forging legal documents.

Time will tell whether the tour will sell tickets, but reactions have been incredulous;

 Disbelieving social media users are wondering how this will pan out, after all the drama that has recently erupted.

Blood is boiling, according to one woman:

Other women were downright outraged:

More details have yet to be announced, but we're sure they'll hit the headlines when they do.

Feature image: algoafm.co.za

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R Kelly's estranged daughter, Joann Kelly (known as Buku Abi) is now speaking out following the airing of explosive Lifetime documentary, Surviving R Kelly.

Buku Abi's father has been under increased spotlight since the horrific sexual abuse allegations were broadcasted in the six-hour series, and now his daughter is voicing her support for his victims.

In a lengthy Instagram post, she wrote a testimonial where she referred to her apparent sexual predator father as a 'monster'.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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She writes that it has taken her "three days just to find the right words" to include in her message, following 30 years of disturbing abuse claims against R Kelly.

Celebrities and the public alike were deeply shocked at the magnitude of the allegations, which featured dozens of his apparent victims telling their stories.

Their testimonies shared the same stomach-churning pattern of sexual assault, rape, mind-control as well as physical and mental abuse.

A number of women were allegedly held hostage in his homes, and some still remain in his custody. His daughter is now sharing her story.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Buku Abi (@bu.k.u) on

Abi writes in a letter that she no longer has any relationship with her biological father, and her and her siblings have not had contact with him in years.

“My mother ( R. Kelly's ex-wife Andrea Kelly), siblings, and I would never condone, support or be apart of ANYTHING negative he has done and continues to do in his life,” she claims.

“The same monster you all confronting me about is my father. I am well aware of who and what he is,” she added, in what must have been a difficult post for her to curate.

“I grew up in that house. My choice to not speak on him and what he does is for my peace of mind. My emotional state. And for MY healing. I have to do and move in a manner that is best for me.”

"Going through all I have gone through in my life, I would never want anyone to feel the pain I have felt."

"Reminders of how terrible my father is, and how we should be speaking up against him, rude comments about my family, fabricating me, my siblings, & our mother's "part," etc., does not help my family in our healing process."

"Nor does it allow a safe space for other victims who are scared to speak up, speak up."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Buku Abi (@bu.k.u) on

Lastly, she offers her prayers for his victims, showing her support for their recovery as well as emphasising how hard this period has been on herself;

"I pray for all the families & women who have been affected by my father's actions. Trust, I have been deeply affected by all of this. However, it has been very difficult to process it all."

"I am speaking from the heart, nothing I say or do not say is to hurt any party reading or affected by this. To the people that feel I should be speaking up/against everything that is going on right now," she continued.

"I just want you all to understand that devastated is an understatement for all that I feel currently. I do apologise if my silence to all that is happening comes off as careless," she concludes.

She makes sure to thank the public for the support and love which she and her family have received in the wake of the documentary.

The R&B singer is now under criminal investigation in Atlanta and Illinois.

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A documentary focusing on sexual abuse allegations made by two men against the late King of Pop Michael Jackson will be aired this spring.

Leaving Neverland features stories told by two men who claim to have been abused by Jackson when they were kids.

Channel 4 commissioned the documentary and say it will be shown on TV in two-parts, to be premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in late January.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Michael Jackson (@michaeljackson) on

A portion of the Sundance website reads;

"At the height of his stardom Michael Jackson began long-running relationships with two boys, aged 7 and 10, and their families. Now in their 30s, they tell the story of how they were sexually abused by Jackson, and how they came to terms with it years later."

Michael Jackson's estate sent a statement to Variety saying;  “This is yet another lurid production in an outrageous and pathetic attempt to exploit and cash in on Michael Jackson.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Michael Jackson (@michaeljackson) on

In 2005, the former child star was acquitted of child molestation charges. Close personal friend and actor Macaulay Culkin was among those who stood on the stand to defend him.

Amos Pictures are creating the film and Dan Reed is heading the production. Reed created the BAFTA award-winning documentary The Paedophile Hunter as well as From Russia with Cash.

The documentary will air on HBO in America in the same week that it airs on Channel 4 in the UK, but no date has been set as of yet.

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Beyoncé's father and former manager of Destiny's Child, Mathew Knowles, is claiming that he did everything possible to protect the girlband from R Kelly.

After hearing "some of those things" about the notorious sexual predator, he deliberately kept Destiny's Child away from him for their safety.

He also admits that hearing about Kelly's horrendous reputation for sexual, mental and physical abuse played a role in stopping the R&B band from collaborating with him.

A criminal investigation into dozens of allegations against R Kelly is now underway in Chicago and Atlanta following the Lifetime documentary Surviving R Kelly.

The Ignition singer, real name Robert Kelly, is accused of holding numerous women in a dangerous 'sex cult' in his homes, as well as having abusive, sexual relationships with underage girls as young as 12. He strongly denies this.

Rumours of his behaviour have been rampant since the early 1990s, after he forged singer Aaliyah's documents to allow her to marry him aged just 15, while he was 27.

Knowles claims that he originally turned down offers for Destiny's Child to collaborate with Kelly at first because he "didn't think it was a good song", according to Metro.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The 67-year-old, who is the father of Beyoncé and Solange, commented that he never let the band members out of his sight;

"I was there, and my former wife Tina was there. The thing with R Kelly was, he liked to record late at night, around midnight. And what was different with his studio was that one room had a recording suite, and next door was a club, with 40 or 50 people dancing."

He continued; "R Kelly was managed by Sony, by someone I won’t name, and at that time, they would almost force you to record with their artists. R Kelly wasn’t cheap – it was $75,000, plus travel costs, so we’re talking $100,000 for a song."

He added that Kelly's negative reputation was in it's early stages, "I personally rejected the song, because I didn’t think it was a good song. Not just because of his reputation – this was around 1998, we had just begun to hear some of those things."

Mathew later said that the rumours surrounding Kelly's deplorable behaviour played a part in his choices for the girlband from then on, he said;

"Certainly, it was both of those things. The girls were 15, 16. When they went to the bathroom, Tina would go with them. They did not leave our eyes." They were allegedly under strict supervision, and were protected from him.

Another source for Metro claims that;

"Record labels would ask R Kelly to write songs for emerging artists as a way to help them break into the industry and he made several requests for Destiny’s Child," the source suggests.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Destiny's Child (@destinyschild) on

"Mathew and Tina rejected all of them because they didn’t want him anywhere near the band which is why they are one of the few acts to debut in the 90s without an R Kelly song in its official discography," they added.

Only one Destiny's Child song is associated with R Kelly, Stimulate Me, which appeared on the soundtrack for Eddie Murphy's film Life in 1999.

Apparently Kelly did not work in the studio at the same time as the group, and the song never actually appeared as an official Destiny's Child release, so the gals are off the hook. 

We're glad Mathew Knowles had the ability to keep the group protected from him, sadly other women weren't as fortunate.

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If you are unfamiliar with the term 'reproductive coercion', it's essentially when another person has more control over your reproductive health than yourself.

Hilary Freeman of The Guardian is now reporting that more women than imagined have no idea that reproductive coercion is a form of abuse.

Studies have revealed that a shocking one-in-four women who attend sexual health clinics report coercion over their reproductive lives, including 'contraceptive sabotage', such as covert condom removal.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Marie Stopes Australia (@mariestopesaus) on

According to BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health, available evidence about the abusive behaviour needs to be updated to 2017 and widen the spectrum of activities involved to include familial pressure, criminal activity and exploitation within sex trafficking.

As well as not being able to choose contraceptives to use or take control of their own reproductive health, reproductive control takes the form of contraceptive sabotage, such as convert condom removal or needling a hole in a condom. 

Not being able to decide whether to start or continue a pregnancy is a major factor, research shows, and the concept of reproductive control (especially over women's autonomy) by others was first described in 2010.

Women's experience of interference with their autonomy goes back centuries, arguably, but research indicates that younger women are particularly vulnerable, as well as those in the black community and racial minorities.

The practice is scarily common, with women having decisions taken away from them by partners, exploiters or family, invalidating consent.

One-in-four women attending sexual healthcare clinics are reporting persuasive methods, emotional blackmail, threatened or actual infidelity and physical violence predominantly perpetrated by male partners but also criminal gangs.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by kindness_kangaroo (@kindness_kangaroo) on

Other examples of contraceptive sabotage include; partners lying about having a vasectomy or sterilisation, refusing to wear condoms, forceful removal of condoms, not using the withdrawal method properly, piercing barrier contraceptives or throwing away contraceptive pills.

Condom removal during sex is referred to as 'stealthing', and is now classified as sexual assault. Spiking drinks or food to induce abortion also was mentioned as occurrences.

The consequences are often emotionally difficult to bear; unintended or unwanted pregnancy, higher abortion risk, higher STI rates and emergency contraceptive usage.

Women in violent, abusive relationships prove especially vulnerable to reproductive coercion, but many are unaware that they are being subjected to reproductive control.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Marie Stopes Australia (@mariestopesaus) on

"The degree of control that a male partner can have will vary from mild to extreme. Milder amounts of control may not be perceived by the victim as unhealthy or abusive."

"Women in a long term relationship may become inured to significant levels of reproductive control," the study's authors write.

The study calls on healthcare professionals must play a crucial part in noticing and preventing this horrifically controlling behaviour.

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Call the Midwife actress Jenny Agutter has sparked MAJOR controversy for her interview with the Radio Times, where she made some highly polarising comments about the #MeToo movement.

She said she can't "fully understand" why actresses who are allegedly victims of the #MeToo movement would meet with male industry figures alone.

The British actress said;

“In the States, there were occasions when you might be asked to go to a private screening or someone’s place and you just didn’t do it – unless you found the person very attractive, in which case you did do it.”

The BBC actress continued; “But if they’re not really attractive, there’s nothing to be gained from it, because it’s obvious what you’re indicating by going.”

“It’s terrible that anyone would use their power in that way. That’s wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong – no question about it," she added, which was a bit of a paradox if you ask us.

The fact that you can't meet with a male figure alone is problematic enough, whether you want to sleep with them or not.

The power planes are also massively different if you have the ability to become the woman's boss, such as a production or directorial role.

“What is sad is to be in a situation where you have to negotiate it: you shouldn’t have to do that. I was very lucky never to have to.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Agutter moved to Hollywood decades ago to pursue her career, and explained that her relationship with a producer at the time allowed her to be "a little bit protected,"

“No one was going to hit on me, with him there! It was a bit like having the Mafia around you,” she said, adding that if she had ended up in such a complex position, she would be “back out of the door rather fast”. 

She finished: “Because there isn’t any part that’s worth that – and I think there’s an arrogance in me a little bit as well, which is, ‘If you’re not casting me because I’m right for the part, then why are we in this situation?’”

Her comments seemed to divide the public, with some parties agreeing with her and others claiming that you shouldn't need protection from a man to navigate a job industry. 

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Warning: this article may be upsetting for anyone who has experienced sexual abuse, assault or harassment.

In case you've missed the drama surrounding R Kelly following the release of a six-hour length Lifetime documentary regarding his sexual predation, the explosive TV episodes have one again brought the dangerous rapper to light.

Horrifying allegations have been made against singer R Kelly for three decades, including an upsetting trial involving 21 counts of child pornography.

The six-part documentary made by Dream Hampton, Surviving R Kelly, retraced reports of the R&B artist's consistent manipulation and abuse of underage girls and sexual misconduct going back 30 years, for which he has never faced any consequences.

Lady Gaga is now being sufficiently ROASTED for declining to appear in the documentary, despite having collaborated with him back in 2013 on the (ironic) track Do What U Want.

Twitter users are calling her out on her debated hypocrisy, as she plays a large role in the #MeToo movement and declared that she has had her own abuser, though won't name him, yet works with known paedophiles.

Her silence in 2019 on the issue has allowed the public to instead retrace a damaging 2013 interview, where the Shallow singer DEFENDS him while in Japan; 

"R Kelly and I have sometimes, very untrue things written about us, so in a way this was a bond between us." Whoa, whoa, whoa. This doesn't look good for Gaga, we have to admit.

She is choosing to remain silent for the moment, though more than a dozen victims who claim to have been raped, enslaved and abused while underage by Kelly have spoken out in the documentary.

Gaga was one of many celebrities who declined to participate in the Surviving R Kelly series, as well as Jay-Z (another collaborator), Dave Chapelle and Mary J Blige.

The move has angered many Gaga fans, given her public history of supporting sexual assault victims.

The rage online is palpable, as numerous fans have pointed out that this exact silence is how Kelly has been left to his own enabled devices for years.

In reality, he has had a support system around him who helped him with his predation.

Despite his child pornography trial taking place in 2002, hundreds of high profile celebrities have collaborated with him since, and are potentially only appearing regretful now because it is damaging to their brand.

A conversation has also arisen surrounding the notion of sexual assault victims and race, with many pointing out that if these women had been black, their stories may have ended differently.

Chance the Rapper has apologised for collaborating with the singer, but upset many people by admitting that he didn't care about the women because they were, in fact, black.

"Making a song with R. Kelly was a mistake. I didn't value the accusers' stories because they were black."

His honesty may be important in continuing this important talk, but the words have understandably hurt millions of women of the black community, who face oppression daily in America.

He later apologised for the quotes, saying they were taken out of context and explaining that the focus should be on the fact that those young black victims were never cared for.

Jada Pinkett Smith is among the celebrities who are asking the same imperative question; Do young black women matter?

Dream Hampton, executive producer of the show, told the Detroit Free Press that;

“It was incredibly difficult to get people who had collaborated with Kelly to come forward." Heartbreakingly, even friends such as Questlove declined to appear, despite believing the accusers' words.

John Legend was the only high-profile person who appeared in the film, writing on Twitter that it was an "easy decision":

#MeToo founder Tarana Burke also appeared in the documentary, as well as talk show host Wendy Williams and R. Kelly's ex-wife Andrea Kelly.

R&B legend Ne-Yo has posted his support for the series, saying that music cannot matter more than the lives of young black women.

Separating the man from the art must be examined as problematic; ignoring the actions of one can harm so many others.

R. Kelly has continuously denied the allegations and was acquitted in 2002 of child pornography charges, yet the evidence to the contrary is overwhelming.

The documentary is massively upsetting to watch, with woman after woman telling stories with paralleling patterns of his behaviour.

Families of young women are still claiming that their daughters are being held captive by R. Kelly as 'sex slaves.'

Chicago reporter Jim DeRogatis made a report in July of 2017 in which he asserts that Kelly keeps his victims captive in Chicago and Atlanta, and two victims (Joycelyn Savage and Azriel Clary) remain in his captivity.

"When u say teenage, how old are we talking" #RKelly #muterkelly #survivingrkelly pic.twitter.com/888SaTEBXx

Human rights organisation BlackWomensBlueprint tweeted,

"The sad truth is survivors still face push-back from naysayers who question their stories or dismiss the crisis of sexual assault- especially against black women and girls. It's a terrible burden to have to endure."

Jerhonda Pace, a survivor of R.Kelly, said, “I felt like a prisoner. I didn’t have anyone to talk to. It was just me. I went into a depression. I was mentally drained, because he would break me down, then build me up, then make me feel like sh*t again, then do it all over again."

"He would really manipulate my mind. The breaking point for me was when Rob slapped me, and he choked me until I blacked out," she concluded.

Let's not forget that when the singer was 27-years-old, he forged then 15-year-old R&B sensation Aaliyah's documents to claim she was 18 in order to marry her. 

The Princess of Urban Pop later died in a plane crash in the Bahamas in 2001 after the unlicensed pilot had cocaine and alcohol in his system.

The documentary's film-maker Dream Hampton claims she hopes "Surviving R. Kelly" serves as a starter tool to "shift culture" and "talk about rape culture and organise against patriarchy, which harms us all."

Non-for-profit advocacy organisation Color of Change tweeted the "strength of black women & girls is determined by how much suffering we can endure. The women in #SurvivingRKelly are our heroes."

Let's hope the conversation will finally spark action and justice for these women.

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