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Kim Kardashian has won $2.5 million in damages after accusing fast fashion brand Missguided of imitating her outfits.

The reality star and fashion mogul has won her lawsuit and $60,000 in lawyer fees after taking the brand to court in America.

TMZ reports that Kardashian claims Missguided was "using her name and likeness" without permission in order to sell knock-offs of her Yeezy dress.

The win was allegedly as a result of Missguided failing to respond to the suit, and as a result the star was awarded the millions in damages by default. The mum-of-four originally sought $10 million

According to the US publication, the court ruled in favour of the 38-year-old because the Missguided website features "entire pages dedicated to selling and knocking off dresses inspired by Kim."

The issue is their use of images to falsely pretend that Kim Kardashian endorse the brand.

Kim took to Twitter in February to slam the brand's copycat ways, writing;

"It’s devastating to see these fashion companies rip off designs that have taken the blood, sweat and tears of true designers who have put their all into their own original ideas."

Fans were quick to point out that her younger sister Kylie has taken ideas from young designers too, but that's a whole other story. Kim is known for wearing clothes from some of the world's most revered designers.

The affordable fashion company responded Kim's frustrated tweet to by writing, "The devil works hard but Missguided works harder. Kim Kardashian: You've only got a few days before this drops online."

The brand is apparently now permanently banned from using Kardashian's trademarks and likeness to market it's merchandise.

Missguided, founded in 2009 in Manchester, has never been shy when it comes to replicating looks of celebrities and certain images to promote it's website.

Feature image: Instagram/@kim_kardashian_west2019

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With all the conversations regarding the decrepit state of our planet, it's no surprise that the terms 'ethical fashion' and 'sustainable clothing' are coming up again and again.

Whether it's the depressing lack of labour rights which garment workers possess, or the untold amount of damage a simple white t-shirt can do to the earth; it's time to get serious about the disastrous environmental impact of fashion.

Fact Attack

1. The truth of the matter is: the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, second only to the oil industry.

Unfortunately, developing countries are constantly the ones to suffer from developed nations and their materialistic consumerist culture. While high street shops have lower pricing, it's important to ask ourselves why this is so.

Normally, it's because the cost of production is incredibly cheap, and the workers aren't being paid in equity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Patagonia Dublin (@patagoniadublin) on

For example, according to Stephen Leahy of The Guardian, 100 million people in India don't have access to drinking water. However, 85 percent of the daily needs of the entire population of India would be provided by the water used to grow the country's cotton.

The same cotton that goes into making our clothes, the clothes of people who have always had access to daily needs like drinking water. So the question is, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Fast fashion is a hugely feminist issue seeing as women in these underdeveloped countries are paid less than men for working in these garment factories.

The number of workplace injuries and deaths in factories in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and Cambodia are still shockingly high.

Now, this article isn't intended to guilt or shame anyone. It's just a wake-up call, and knowing the facts of this vital topic can lead to change. Change can lead to less harm on the planet, and isn't that always a good thing?

2. First of all, it's important to know that the untreated toxic waste-waters from textile factories are often dumped directly into the rivers of countries where clothes are made.

These waste-waters contain toxic substances like arsenic, mercury and lead, which kill the aquatic life and health of millions living by that same river. Contamination reaches the sea and spreads globally.

The use of fertilizers for cotton production heavily pollute waters, another danger of creating just a single item of clothing for brands we all know and buy from. 

Image: Catch News

3. Clothing in our culture has become disposable, and more and more textile waste is accumulating as a result. According to Elizabeth Cline of The Atlantic, a family in the 'western world' throws away an average of 30kg of clothing every year.

4. Only 15 percent of this is recycled or donated, and what happens to the rest? Landfill or incineration.

What's worse, synthetic fibres like polyester are plastic fibres, and can take up to 200 years to decompose.

Global textiles production emits 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases every single year. That's more than international flights and maritime shipping put together, according to Fashion Revolution.

5. These biodegradable synthetic fibres are used in a shocking 72 percent of our clothing. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

6. The UK population has £10.5 billion worth of unworn clothes in their closet, according to recent research. It's massively valuable to donate your unworn clothes rather than throw them away. Every item of apparel has a history, and can tell a story.

Fast fashion is having an unparalleled influence on the planet, with more and more clothes being incinerated into the air every year.

Workers are suffering in poverty to make our clothes, and we have no idea who they even are. We have a responsibility to bring ethics into what we wear and how we style ourselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ethical & Sustainable Fashion (@thekindguide) on

The issue may seem far away, but we can't ignore the problem any longer.

Clothing is a basic human need, give someone else the chance to wear the clothes you don't want anymore.

6. The apparel industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions, because our clothes are made in countries which power their factories with coal.

This means our synthetic fibres are basically made from fossil fuel, hence why it's so important to buy clothes with natural fibres.

Image: Remake

Here's our survival guide for ethical shopping and sustainable fashion, but remember: Nobody's perfect.

Even if you reduce your buying habits a tiny bit, or change one of your high street shops to an ethical brand, that's great. Just do your best; if everyone did a little, it would mean a lot.

Swap Shops

The Nu. Wardrobe is an Irish female-led startup company focusing on dramatically reducing fashion waste by encouraging the swapping or renting of clothes. Their tag-line is 'Look Good. Save Money. Reduce Waste.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@thenuwardrobe) on

Right on, gals. Extending the life cycle of clothes is hugely important in the fight against fast fashion.

Why not borrow an outfit from a friend or sibling instead of buying something entirely new when you probably don't need to?

Of course, it's important to treat yourself every now and again, and we all need new threads every once and a while when our body sizes change etc, but just remember to ask yourself every time: Do I really need this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

Charity shopping/Vintage outlets

Dun Laoghaire's main street contains some great charity shops like Bernardos, Oxfam, Age Action, Goodwill and more.

George's Street in the city centre also have a great selection of charity shops with the proceeds going to St. Vincent de Paul, Oxfam and Enable Ireland.

The array of vintage shops in Dublin is not to be understated. Head to Dublin Vintage Factory (there are two shops) in Temple Bar for the cheapest but best selection of vintage clothing.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Vintage Factory (@dublinvintagefactory) on

Vintage has emerged onto the scene even more in recent years, and has undoubtedly become one of the biggest trends in Dublin fashion.

Why not buy something no one else could possibly have? Pre-owned and pre-loved.

Other options include; Tola Vintage, Nine Crows, Lucy's Lounge, Monto, The Harlequin, Folkster, Tahiti Vintage, Om Diva, The Cat's Meow, Siopaella and Retro in George's Street Arcade and Temple Bar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tola Vintage Reworked (@tolavintagereworked) on

Apps: Depop/Good On You

Depop has become our addiction in recent months. The app is a clothes-selling platform, basically a digital swap shop, and the range of fashion styles involved is incredible.

Shipping from all over the world, the items are totally unique. You'll see some amazing style trends as well, and the app allows you to refine your searches for uber specific items and brands.

From vintage sportswear brands to quirky 1990s-era fashion pieces, don't miss out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Depop (@depop) on

It's a great feeling knowing that you aren't buying brand new clothes all the time, and the app allows you to make some $ cash dollah $ by selling all of the clothes you haven't worn since your teenage disco days.

We first heard about Good On You from none other than Emma Watson. If she models and endorses them, they have to be sheer excellence.

The app allows you to inform yourself all about the workers rights and sustainability of your favourite brands.

They offer great suggestions for ethical and sustainable brands too, and it's practical and easy to use.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Our favourite ethical/sustainable brands

Finding sustainable clothing for an affordable price can be challenging in Ireland, mainly because of shipping charges.

It's a huge comfort to know that you're paying for clothing made by people who have workers rights, and that they are high-quality. Here are some of our all-time fave brands:

Reformation

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reformation (@reformation) on

Weekday

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@weekdayofficial) on

People Tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@peopletreeuk) on

Oxfam

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Oxfam Ireland (@oxfamireland) on

Thought

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Thought (@thoughtclothing) on

Fame and Partners

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fame and Partners (@fameandpartners) on

Ilk + Ernie

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ilkandernie) on

Ninety Percent

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ninety Percent (@ninety_percent) on

Other gorgeous favourites include: Base Range, Etica, Everlane, Uniqlo, Exhibit, Komodo, Patagonia, Athleta, Petra Von Kant, Lara Intimates, Mayamiko, Thoreau, Boyish and ASOS Made in Kenya

Last but not least, we recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, it pulls back the curtain on fast fashion and the developing world. It's time to wear your values.

Feature image:  Instagram/@cheriebirkner/@sustainablefashionmatterz

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The first ever law on ending violence and harassment in the working world at the International Labour Conference (ILC) in Geneva is being negotiated by governments, trade unions and employers.

ActionAid is addressing the issue, demanding that all parties agree to a strong, binding treaty which protects women and marginalised workers.

The organisation has now released the findings of a survey in order to gain awareness about the ILC conference and the extreme importance of laws to protect women.

Just 37 percent of Irish people who participated knew that there is zero laws a an international level to eliminate workplace gender-based violence and harassment

82 percent of those surveyed said that they care about the conditions in the factories where their clothes are made, but 65 percent claimed it's hard to know which brands are ethical.

82 percent of consumers in Ireland stated that if a clothing brand was exposed to in the media because its clothes are made in factories where women experience sexual violence and harassment, they would refuse to shop there.

28 per cent of Irish people believe that governments are responsible for making sure that clothes are produced in an ethical way. This would mean that, in factories, workers are paid a living wage, work in safe conditions and are free from sexual violence or harassment. 

38 percent however claimed it's the employer's responsibility. The global  justice organisation also gathered data from 200 garment factory workers, including 181 women, in the capital city of Bangladesh.

80 percent of the workers claimed they were subjected to sexual harassment and/or abuse at work.

ActionAid have heard shocking stories of colleagues sexually assaulted on the factory floor, women abused for not meeting targets and losing their job for being pregnant. 

72 percent of garment worker respondents said they had been subjected to extreme verbal abuse at work.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Refgee (@refgeeshop) on

73 per cent of Irish consumers wouldn’t work in a place where workers face gender-based violence, according to ActionAid, and 80 per cent would say no to working in unsafe buildings. Yet garment workers in Bangladesh face these dangerous conditions on a daily basis, and it's not headline news.

The Rana Plaza tragedy killed over 1,100 people just six years ago, but all garment workers surveyed still reported some level of concern over safety in the workplace.

90 percent stated that their jobs were impacting their own health, such as eyesight, injured hands and feet, exhaustion, depression and severe back pain.

CEO of ActionAid Ireland, Siobhan McGee, said;

“The #MeToo movement has brought the issue of sexual violence and harassment at work to the fore. But, the most vulnerable, marginalised and underpaid workers cannot be left out.

"Governments and employers now have the opportunity to act by voting in favour of the first international law to tackle gender-based violence in the world of work."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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“Right now, 59 countries still have no national laws against violence and harassment at work, and so a progressive, binding, global treaty is the only way to protect women and other marginalised workers," McGee continued.

“Our research shows that the majority of Irish consumers believe it is the responsibility of governments and brands to protect workers in global supply chains, such as the garment industry.

“Consumers, hit by austerity measures and rising global inequality, face tough choices when the only clothes they can afford are cheap, fast fashion that puts garment workers at risk of abuse. It’s up to brands and governments to ensure that the decision to buy ethical clothing is not only a choice the rich can make.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Nicolas Velter (@nicolasvelter) on

One woman, Shopna, has been a garment worker for 16 years and now operates a sewing machine. She has experienced many unwanted sexual advances over the years, and witnessed incidents of assault on other women by powerful men.

Shopna unfortunately faced harassment from an inappropriate factory manager, who repeatedly asked her to stay back after work, but she said no. He violently attacked her after she came into work earlier than other workers.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Natasha Krelle

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Sustainability has come to the forefront in recent months, as our generation becomes more and more concerned with the environmental impacts our actions are having. 

One area in particular which negatively impacts the world and accelerates climate change is the fast fashion industry. Luckily, people are wising up to the true cost of a cheap trend piece, with bloggers, celebrities and community leaders alike leading the charge to raise awareness about fast fashion – as well as brands listening to their shoppers and creating sustainable and recycled ranges.

This weekend, an event is kicking off in Dublin for those who want to learn more about minimising their fast fashion footprint and become immersed in the sustainable style community. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Native Events (@nativeevents_) on

The first in a series of events dedicated to promoting sustainability in the cultural sector. 

The vent includes panel discussions on fashion sustainability, a market showcasing fashion finds, and a runway show full of Ireland's best and environmentally friendly brands and young designers. 

The event is being held as part of Fashion Revolution Week, with over twenty exhibitors taking part in the market and fashion show; each showcasing their sustainable, recycled, and upcycled designs.

Native Event’s Sustainable Fashion Show is being held tomorrow, Saturday, April 27th in the D-Light Studios, Dublin.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Less Is More UK (@less.is.more.uk) on

Panel discussions will be chaired by Swapsies founder Clodagh Kelly and Katie Harrington, who host the upcoming podcast Climate Queens.

Panel topics include “Is Green The New Black?” and “The Future Of Fashion: How Do We Successfully Transition To A Circular Economy?”.

Panellists on the evening are fashion and sustainability industry leaders such as Carrie Ann Moran of Fashion Revolution Ireland and the Rediscovery Centre, Siofra Caherty of Jump The Hedges, and Megan Best of Attention Attire and Body&Soul.

The event is the perfect excuse to get your gals together to learn more about making a positive change when it comes to fashion consumption. 

Many of us feel a pressure to have cyclic wardrobes, with items being disposed of regularly and replaces with new, affordable buys as new trends roll in. However, many affordable items are made of cheap, plastic-based fabrics which take hundreds of years to break down in landfills. The pressure to buy a new outfit for each social occasion on adds to this issue further. 

The panel discussions will shed light on these issues, while the fashion show and marketplace will showcase how diverse and stylish sustainable brands can be. 

Tickets are only €10,00, and you can nab them here before they sell out. 

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Brands have been impersonating Kim Kardashian and her family's style for YEARS (have you seen Boohoo and Fashion Nova's websites?) but now Kim's had enough.

Fast-fashion companies have been stealing original designers from "true designers", and the KK Beauty mogul has finally commented on the Instagram-type brand lookalikes.

She wrote a host of tweets addressing the issue, and has officially filed a lawsuit against Missguided for $10 million;

"It’s devastating to see these fashion companies rip off designs that have taken the blood, sweat and tears of true designers who have put their all into their own original ideas."

She addressed the Yeezy controversy, airing out her annoyance that fashion organisations have been blatantly copying her husband Kanye West's designs;

"I’ve watched these companies profit off my husband’s work for years and now that it’s also affecting designers who have been so generous to give me access to their beautiful works, I can no longer sit silent," she said.

She continued, referencing the Thierry Mugler dress she recently wore;

"Only two days ago, I was privileged enough to wear a one-of-a-kind vintage Mugler dress and in less than 24 hours it was knocked off and thrown up on a site – but it's not for sale. You have to sign up for a waitlist because the dress hasn’t even been made to sell yet."

"My relationships with designers are very important to me. It's taken me over a decade to build them and I have a huge amount of respect for the amount of work that they put into bringing their ideas to life."

"I often plan for weeks, sometimes months, and even a year in advance, and I’m grateful for every fashion moment those designers and their dresses have helped me create," she tweeted.

While Kim didn't actually name any fashion brands, she filed a $10 million lawsuit against Missguided for using her trademarked name and likeness to promote it's product online, according to E! News.

E! News obtained the documents detailing the lawsuit against the UK-based company. In the suit, Kim writes that their actions are a "blatant and willful violation of her statutory and common law rights of publicity." 

The document states that "companies have sought out ways to leverage Kim's celebrity status and social media following without seeking her consent," and have purposefully allowed her to be "an unwitting and unwilling spokesperson of their products."

The lawsuit also states that Missguided has used Kim's likeness for their "marketing and sales strategy" without the TV personality's consent.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

"Like other 'fast fashion' companies, Missguided, which sells clothing throughout the world on its website (among others), has become notorious for 'knocking off' the clothing worn by celebrities like Kardashian," the suit continues.

"Missguided does not merely replicate the looks of these celebrities as seen on red carpets, in paparazzi photos, and in social media posts. Missguided systematically uses the names and images of Kardashian and other celebrities to advertise and spark interest in its website and clothing."

Missguided issued the following statement to E! News.

"We haven't received any notification of legal action, but in any event any action based on online banter would be meritless," the statement read. "Missguided shoppers know the score- We're about the celeb look, for people without their bucks. For the record, as much as we love her style, we're not working with Kim on anything."

Last February, the reality TV star posed in an unreleased gold dress her husband Kanye West made for her last summer, and wrote on Instagram;

"P.S. fast fashion brands, can you please wait until I wear this in real life before you knock it off," she captioned her post. Fashion Nova created basically the same dress not long afterwards.

"Hey @KimKardashian, We just couldn't help ourselves," they wrote on Instagram. Cheeky bunch they are…

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Diet Prada ™ (@diet_prada) on

As far as we know, Kim has yet to file a lawsuit against Fashion Nova. Missguided also copied the exact same dress.

They're fairly shameless, we have to admit. Time will tell if the Kardashian manages to quench the copycats.

Feature image: @kimkardashian/Instagram

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If you're searching for some serious style on a budget, but don't want to contribute to the growing environmental and ethical problems related to fast fashion, then we have the perfect sustainable, ethical fashion event for you.

Designers in the City is an Irish organisation which exists to empower local brands, to enable burgeoning talent to find their platform and to encourage environmentally friendly fashion.

Special pop up store events take place in quirky and sociable locations for the public to have a whole other type of shopping experience.

Now they're bringing their pop up shop to the Chelsea Drugstore this February, and we cannot WAIT:

On February 4 at 5pm, the event launches at the gorgeous and elegant location, allowing local designers and their work to be seen and appreciated by Dubliners.

Their venues act as partners for their creativity, and facilitate the great atmosphere, unique designers and local artists while giving you a great day out.

Designers in the City have also carried out exclusive interviews with fashionistas like Katrina McElroy from Slow Fashion Salon and Claire Prouvost, who educate the viewer about fast fashion, as well as Aga Kuchminster. who creates vegan face cream.

From vegan beauty products, stunning jewellery and all kinds of fashion and styles, the Designers in the City event is definitely not to be missed. 

Fashion is the SECOND most polluting industry after oil, according to the World Economic Forum. There are also $46.7 BILLION worth of clothes in UK closets, and it takes a shocking 2,700 litres of water to make just one t-shirt.

The textile industry is also the second biggest water polluter, which has hugely damaging effects worldwide. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@designers_in_the_city) on

We need to start making some vital changes to how we wear, buy, and produce fashion. Educating ourselves and shopping as events like Designers in the City's creation is the ideal place to start.

For more information on the unique event, check out their Instagram page, Twitter, or visit Eventbrite for tickets.

The Chelsea Drugstore is located on 25 South Great Georges Street, Dublin 2.

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Fast fashion from high street stores is the perfect way to get your new season fashion fix on a budget, but an investigation has revealed that factories supplying some of the most popular high street shops in the UK may be taking advantage of their workers. 

An undercover investigation by Channel 4's Dispatches claims workers at these factories are paid less than the national minimum wage.

The documentary was broadcast this week, and it alleged that some workers are paid £3–£3.50 (€3.50-€4.08) an hour at three UK factories, some of which were sub-contracted to supply River Island, Missguided and New Look.

Newstalk heard from a River Island spokesperson who told them that the factory featured in the show was, "removed from our Approved Factory List in February 2016, following two failed River Island audits. Suppliers were informed not to use this factory for any further River Island orders."

"We are investigating this issue and will take appropriate action. Sub-contracting without River Island’s approval is a serious breach of our Terms and Conditions," the statement continued.

River Island are currently undertaking appropriate measures to investigate the matter further. 

"New Look is committed to respecting and improving the lives of workers right across our global business and supply chains, so we are extremely concerned by the outcome of this investigation," said a statement from the popular store. 

Missguided said they have instantly ended production in the factory that was named in the documentary. 

One of the factories at fault told the undercover Dispatchers reporter that competition from overseas was the cause of the underpaying.

"We don’t get paid much for our clothes, and we need to compete with China and Bangladesh. They can get it cheap there. How will they get it made cheaper here? If we pay everyone £10 or £6 then we will make a loss."

Here's to hoping that factories like this get shut down for good.

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