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feminism

This may just boil your blood to dangerous levels. Many of us are well-used to cleaning up after ourselves, as well as the men around us.

New research has found that women who share a home with a male partner undertake the 'majority' of the household chores, which is unsurprising to most.

Researchers at University College London and Imperial College London have found that women still do most of the household duties when they live with a man, specifically 16 hours per week on tasks compared to the mere six that men carry out.

The Independent reported on the data, which was taken on 8513 heterosexual couples who lived together between the ages of 16 and 25 from 2010 until 2012 in the UK.

The findings of the UK Household Longitudinal Study can't be applied to queer couples or couples who don't live together.

The study was published in the journal Work, Employment and Society, and focused on a series of weekly work variables; hours spent at a paid job, hours spent caring for a child or adult and hours spent on chores.

The education of the participants and their attitudes towards gender roles were also examined.

The couples were divided into eight groups, based on the balance of paid and domestic work each partner carried out.

A range of people were included with different backgrounds such as low caregiving responsibilities, men who are the primary earner, women who are the breadwinners, women who do most of the household work, dual earners who shared caregiving responsibilities, women who work part-time and do domestic work, couples with men who work long hours, and unemployed couples with low caregiving responsibilities. 

It was found that women completed the majority of the domestic tasks in a shocking 93 percent of the couples surveyed.

When both partners worked full-time, women were FIVE TIMES more likely to spend 20 hours or more a week on chores.

50 percent of the couples examined had a "relatively egalitarian division of work," according to the authors of the study.

However, only two groups (seven percent of the couples) were seen to be the most egalitarian: a female earner who shared domestic work and couples in which men spent long hours on chores.

"The female-earner was the only group in which men’s contribution to the housework was similar to that of their partners, and this group had the highest proportion of women with educational qualifications higher than those of their partners," the study reads.

The authors concluded that in the UK, "gender equality in divisions of work is rare and gender norms remain strong."

Both partners need to share feminist ideals when it comes to household work being divided fairly, but a baby constantly thrust couples back into their old roles.

"The largest egalitarian groups in this study were less likely to have children," according to the data.

Gender disparities clearly still exist when it comes to care-giving and household duties, with domestic employment still mainly women in the workforce.

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By Anna Murray

I was your typical Irish mammy heading to the O’Reilly Theatre on Thursday night. I wore pink and told my sister to wear pink too. We weren't the only ones, of course, because it turns out feminists DO wear pink but they also wear anything else they want. I brought my book and made my partner take a million pictures. I gushed at the number of lads who attended because Irish men are UNREAL allies. I wished my 5-year-old daughter was old enough to attend and understand the significance of being in the presence of these gals who were changing the world, one interview at a time.

Scarlett Curtis is as gorgeous, adorable and fierce in real life as she is on her podcast. I was so excited to see Saoirse Ronan, THE voice for my generation of Irish women in the public eye. I cried because Sinéad Burke, Irish fashion writer, primary school teacher and activist blew me away with her strength, beauty and mesmerising knack for public speaking.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Sinéad Burke (@thesineadburke) on

The two guest speakers were fresh off the Met Gala pink carpet, Sinéad being the first EVER little person to attend, dressed in stunning Gucci. After a hilarious set by comedian Grace Campbell (which centred around clitorises and cornflakes), the three speakers delved into a discussion about representation in high places within the fashion and film industries. The determination in their voices made me confident that the world is becoming better at accepting, better at encouraging and an all-around better place for my daughter and her generation to inherit.

Here are some of the key points I took away from the Feminists Don’t Wear Pink (And Other Lies) podcast, live from Dublin.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Irish women are a force to be reckoned with

Sinéad silenced the room by asking us to ‘remember this time last year?’

You could feel the intake of breath. "We didn’t know and the loudest voices told us it was going to be a no," she said. That hit hard and many of us felt the familiar sting of Repeal tears we had held back over and over again last May. Scarlett told us that the women of Ireland gave her hope and comfort with their bravery as she sat in her apartment in New York, at a time where American women were feeling less valued every day.

Feminism MUST be intersectional

If we took anything away from the evening, it was that intersectional feminism is the only feminism. Try not to focus simply on the disparities between men and women. Listen to people of colour, the disabled community, the LGBTQ+ community and any other group that can use feminism as away to gain support and understanding. Learn what you can about the struggles of individuals and as Sinéad pointed out, go looking for it. Follow Instagram accounts that promote the visibility and representation of everyone. Why wouldn’t we join forces to create this immense power that’s hell-bent on the representation of ALL kinds?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Confidence Is EVERYTHING

Saoirse Ronan spoke about the strong women in her life and how they helped her believe she could do anything. Scarlett Curtis spoke about surrounding herself with like-minded, strong women who encouraged her feminist journey. Sinéad Burke encouraged us to ask for things want. A woman won’t apply for a job if she only meets 90 percent of the required criteria. A man, on the other hand, will give it a go if he meets 10 percent. "Think you’re the shit because everyone else does," she told us.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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We need boys

Men and boys have a central role to play in the strive towards gender equality. Not simply as allies nodding their heads in agreement, but to improve their own lives too. Two fab suggestions were offered when an audience member asked how she could teach the feminist message to boys in her primary school class. Sinéad Burke, a primary school teacher herself, spoke about the significance of representation in books, workbooks and classroom materials.

Have a poster showing a diverse team of firefighters hanging on your wall when teaching about jobs and careers. Though it may take more time, print off worksheets that show the diversity of all kinds. Small things matter. Scarlett suggested that since many of us have discovered feminism within our own struggles, to explain to boys how this ideology will personally benefit them by creating a world where their vulnerability and individuality is cherished.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Of course, I could go on and on about this panel, that I was lucky enough to see. I could talk for days about the importance of these discussions and to makes sure there are ALL KINDS of people at the table when they happen. We all deserve to be at these tables and in these rooms. The world needs the input of everyone to become a better place. 

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During her time in the Love Island villa, Megan Barton-Hanson was judged for many things – her attitude to romance, her choice to have plastic surgery and her on-point style were just a few. 

However, nothing drew more judgement than the revelation that she had once worked as a stripper and the fact that she had sex in the Love Island house on camera – two things which speak to the discrimination women who enjoy their sexuality still face. 

Since exiting the villa, Megan has become a vocal spokesperson for gender equality and personal sexual empowerment – championing women to embrace their power and be unashamedly themselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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'We are no different than men. Why should women get penalised for saying they like to have sex?' she told SHEmazing, who chatted to Megan about her new role as an ambassador for PrettyLittleThing – a role that is exceptionally fitting, with Megan and the brand's attitudes to self-empowerment and individualism harmonising perfectly.  

'Why if you dress in a certain way you get penalised? Why if you're in a certain industry you get put down for that? I don't see why for men, it's applauded and they're praised for going out and getting a load of girls and have sex on TV, but if you're a girl, it's like everyone is in shock.'

'Especially the fact that I slept with not one but two guys on Love Island, people can't get over it, it was groundbreaking. But I don't see why its like that Adam (Collard) did exactly the same and he didn't get half the stick I did for it. '

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Megan Barton-Hanson (@meganbartonhanson_) on

When discussing her female role models in this space, the model cited vocal women like Amy Schumer and Amber Rose – who faced serious slut shaming at the hands of her ex-boyfriend Kanye West when he said ' I had to take 30 showers before I got with Kim,' following his relationship with Amber – literally implying that she was dirty. 

'I think its time to move on and I think the more people like me who are in the public eye to say that there is nothing wrong with it, people like Amber Rose and Amy Schumer, the more girls will be open about it and honest, I think the more accepted it will be,' Megan said. 

'I think it's really old fashioned to look at it as women need to be virginal.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Megan Barton-Hanson (@meganbartonhanson_) on

Megan revealed that she receives countless messages from women and girls who are facing bullying based on sexuality and slut shaming in their personal lives.

'Loads of girls DM me about similar things. Obviously it hurts when someone is negative towards you – it's taken me years to just own it and say 'do you know what, there's nothing I can do, this is just me and why should I feel bad that I have a high sex drive.' 

'Im not ashamed of it, I'm not ashamed that I was a stripper. The first thing is, you have to accept yourself amd not care what anyone else says.'

Megan has always been open about her journey to self acceptance – despite being an exceptionally confident and empowering woman, she faced hardships like anyone else. 

'It was difficult. My whole school life I was put down, bullied, for having different boyfriends and stuff like that, and then in my area I started dancing and everyone was like 'oh my God, I can't believe Megan's done that.'

'It was a journey and it wasn't easy but I think with age you just grow in confidence and learn to accept yourself.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Megan Barton-Hanson (@meganbartonhanson_) on

When it comes to personal style, Megan is known for her on-trend medley of high glam and street wear – with feminist slogan t-shirts being mixed and matched with curve-skimming dresses and edgy jumpsuits. 

Her advice to anyone who wants to be more experimental with their personal style? 'I think you shouldn't take fashion so seriously, dress how YOU want to dress, don't worry about what other people are saying as long as you're happy.'

'I think people just take it too seriously, especially with social media, there are always pictures of what you have worn to this event and that (event), but it doesn't need to be so serious,'

'If one day you want to war a short body-con dress, do that if the next day you want to dress in street style like baggy combat trousers, do that,' she continued.

'Just embrace your body, everyone has got different shapes and sizes so just do you.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Megan Barton-Hanson (@meganbartonhanson_) on

The Love Island stars get a bit of slack for being fairly prolific with the sponsored Instagram posts – but Megan's social media is noticeably devoid of sponsorships. 

Megan revealed that this was a choice of hers, as she didn't want to champion every brand which came her way as a gesture of authenticity to her audience.

'I felt like I had a responsibility, because a lot of people who watch Love Island are younger girls and they don't have loads of money, so I didn't want to put my name to everything just for the sake of me getting paid and advertising things I didn't believe in.'

'PrettyLittleThing really is a brand that I really do believe in, and I love the fact that they cater for all different shapes and sizes, it's affordable, it's on trend, and it's always been a brand I've loved.'

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Feminism has gained momentum in recent years as a movement with more visibility and a modern cause to fight for. 

Globally, women have felt the pressure of the patriarchy, as the USA ushered in a new presidential era headed up by a man who advocates grabbing women by their genitals. 

In Ireland, women have just won the right to obtain body autonomy, as the 8th Amendment to the constitution which deprives women of their rights to make decisions about their own reproductive organs has just been repealed, as well as petitioning for more transparency on the gender wage gap issue. 

More and more celebrities have put their name to the F-word, and the popularity of feminist podcasts like The Guilty Feminist and Women of the Hour show a social interest in the movement. 

It seems that the increased popularity of feminism has led to an attempt to sell the social movement, with companies and brands attempting to capitalise on the notion of female empowerment and making a buck on what they see as a passing trend of woke women.

Recently, I was in a high street store when I noticed that from all angles I was being bombarded with feminist messaging. 

From 'Empower Women,' complete with a female gender symbol, to 'Girls Support Girls,' the shop had clearly tapped into the idea that feminism is visible and was attempting to profit from the ideology. 

While keeping these slogans visible is seriously important, there is a question to be asked about the integrity of seeing what was once written on the hand-painted sign of a women's march attendee on a €9.99 T-shirt.

Yes, visibility matters, but treating feminism as a fashion trend rather than a social and political stance can minimise the necessity of the movement, especially when those T-shirts and necklaces will be in the bargain bin in a few months time. 

Every blogger worth their salt is rocking a Girl Power T-shirt or Girl Gang slogan necklace, but the use of these terms is hollow when the influencer or brand does nothing to further the movement themselves. 

Some influencers with a platform have donned these garments as evidence of their trendiness rather than their awareness of gender equality issues. 

To be on-trend is to be 'woke,' but how can one morally put on an 'empower women' top and then fail to use their platform of hundreds of thousands to discuss feminist issues?

I mean no shade towards any women who choose to wear the garments without speaking about issues facing Irish women, everyone has the right to speak about issues they hold close to their hearts, but it is a point to consider. 

 

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Now I know I sound like a bit of a spoil sport, but it's kind of like wearing a football jersey for a team you don't follow. 

That being said, there is nothing wrong with experimenting with your fashion choices, and if donning a Fearless Female top will make you feel like a total bad ass, then go for it. 

High-end designers such as Dior recently debuted feminist slogan T-shirts on the runway, and a recent Chanel show finished with a protest formation of models with signs proclaiming feminist ideals, so it's no wonder the high street is following suit. 

There is nothing inherently wrong with showing your support of gender equality through a piece of clothing.

However, the capitalisation of the word does minimise its impact somewhat. 

The cause in itself is essential, but it's also worth checking that the female factory workers sewing your 'feminism' shirt aren't being paid a dollar a day in an overseas factory, so make sure you do your research on whatever company or brand you buy from. 

 

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As an owner of a Girl Gang T-shirt, you might say I can't talk, but along with making me feel like a boss b**** while wearing it, I also try my best to involve myself in feminist discussion wherever possible ( I know, I'm so woke). 

However, feminism is also all about women making decisions for themselves, and I'm not trying to shame anyone into feeling like they're not a 'good enough' feminist by purchasing these pieces of high street clothing. 

I guess what I'm trying to say is, if you're going to buy the T-shirt, make sure you buy the message too. 

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When it comes to marriage advice, we're pretty sceptical. It nearly always comes across as patronising, annoying, or just plain sexist. Men don't get the constant stream of wedding and baby pressure that women do.

There's no shortage of dating advice online and in magazines, even in books like He's Just Not That Into You.

It's time to turn to better sources for comfort, and ones from back in time. The Suffragette's seem like a good place to start… They fought for the right to vote and now we want the right NOT to devote.

Seeing as it's Valentine's Day, it would be rude of us not to share this HILARIOUS piece of advice from a "suffragette wife" which went viral, acccording to Stylist.

The advice was first penned in 1911, and it's still hella relevant today. Entitled 'Advice on Marriage to Young Ladies', the gal holds nothing back and takes zero prisoners.

The first tip? "Do not marry at all." She's starting us off with a big one, that's for sure.

Continuing, the woman writes about the types of men to avoid. Think modern day f*ckboys. She refers to them as, “the Beauty Men, Flirts, and the Bounders, Tailor’s Dummies, and the Football Enthusiasts”.

When it comes to decent marriage prospects, choose a "strong, tame man" who is involved in practical professions, such as a "Fire-lighter, Coal-getter, Window Cleaner and Yard Swiller”. We haven't a notion what a yard swiller is, but it sounds chic.

The suffragette also tells us that the standard of men is dastardly low; most are “lazy, selfish, thoughtless, lying, drunken, clumsy, heavy-footed, rough, unmanly brutes, and need taming”.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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How do you tame a man back in 1911, and today? The answer is pretty obvious: food. "Feed the brute," in her words. LOL. 

Her final tip recalls her first; you'd "be wiser not to chance" marriage, because it "isn't worth the risk." The post was shared last year as well and also went viral, so it seems that modern day women can still relate to the tip sheet.

It's over 100 years old, but still resonates with today's audience. Interesting, does that mean men haven't progressed at all, or we're still stuck in 1911? We can't tell…

Feature image: The Guardian

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Ah, Galentine's Day. Our saviour from the horrors of Valentine's Day, AKA the only day of the year where showing love and men being romantic is socially acceptable.

Whether companies are using female friendships as a marketing tool or not is a WHOLE other discussion.

For now, we're just gonna bring Leslie Knope vibes for 2019's Galentine's Day, which falls the day before Valentine's Day, and celebrates the power of galpals.

Of course, you don't need to be single to celebrate the special day that is Galentine's; You can snatch all them sexy roses from your boo and high five your ladypals at the same time.

day celebrating GIF

1. Channelling the OG Renaissance Romantics:

2. Spreading those holidays around for the gals: 

3. Don't forget, there are SO many alternatives to the most romantic day of the year:

4. Valentine or Valentino Day though? Respect fashion, innit:

5. Honestly, we prefer a Valentine's pupper instead of a rose:

6. Broke girl hacks:

7. Real-talk, stay in school kids:

8. Marriage vibes:

9.  YOU IS KIND, YOU IS SMART, YOU IS IMPORTANT:

10Life hack:

11. Sending respect to the new Queen of Both Being Single and Releasing Smash Singles, Ari:

12.  The OG Leslie Knope is of, course, a feature in our memes this Galentine's Day:

13.  Don't forget all those marytrs who died for their fellow femalez:

14. Get the coin, not the groin:

15. The TEMERITY, how dare they?

16. Google needs to get it's sh*t together:

17Humpback whales have BFFs too, they probably chat about trashy boys and online shop together too… 

18. Wine + lady friendships + female empowerment = JOY.

19.  Lets get SPOOKY:

20. The eternal struggle:

We gotta make Leslie Knope proud, ladies.

She deserves it for inventing this incredibly special day, but don't forget to show love to the women in your life 24 hours a DAY, are we right?

day forget GIF

Feature image: LAist 

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A gorgeous and powerfully vivid collection of essays written by Emilie Pine has won the An Post Book of the Year for 2018.

Notes to Self sees Pine writing on a variety of important moments in her life, including sexual assault, fertility problems, sexism in the academia sector, feminism, depression and addiction.

Published by Tramp Press, the book has been widely read around Ireland since it's publication, and has deeply resonated especially with women nationwide who relate to the stark and emotional work.

Emilie tweeted her joy at hearing the news, writing on Twitter: "Delighted and honoured to win Book of the Year 2018….Thank you to everyone who voted."

She also paid tribute to Tramp Press for commissioning the work, which tugged at the heartstrings of Irish women and men nationwide with it's brutal and visceral honesty.

The An Post Irish Book of the Year 2018 was handpicked by a public vote from a list of category winners which were recently announced at the An Post Irish Book Awards.

The esteemed prize boasts previous winners such as John Crowley's Atlas of the Irish Revolution, written with Donal Ó Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and Dr. John Borgonovo, Solar Bones by Mike McCormack, Academy Street by Mary Costello, The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan, Belinda McKeon's Solace, Staring at Lakes by Michael Harding and Asking For It by Louise O'Neill.

Chairperson of the An Post Irish Book Awards Maria Dickenson said; “Emilie Pine’s Notes to Self was one of the great stories in Irish bookselling in 2018 and I’m delighted that the voting public has chosen it as the An Post Book of the Year."

"The power and honesty of Emilie’s essays have captivated readers, and it’s truly gratifying both to see her talent rewarded and to see an Irish publisher like Tramp Press receive this well-deserved recognition," she continued.

Readers of the book couldn't put the engrossing work down. David McRedmond, CEO of An Post, commented on Emilie's wonderful win,

“2018 was a huge year for Irish writing and no book illustrates better why An Post is delighted to sponsor the Irish Book Awards: Emilie Pine’s book, a challenging read, is deeply human and Irish, emotional and clever. An Post thanks all the voters for engaging with the Awards in such large numbers.”

The An Post Irish Book Awards celebrate and promote Irish writing to a wide range of readers, bringing together a massive community who are passionate about writing. Readers, authors, booksellers, publishers and librarians unite to recognise Irish talent.

Congratulations to Emilie on her deserved achievement, we can't wait to consume her next piece of beautiful and fearless writing.

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Gillette has made more than a few mortal, and almost exclusively male, enemies today after it debuted its brand new advert about toxic masculinity.

The ad is currently trending on Twitter, having clocked up three million views already on YouTube as well as 282,000 dislikes.

The two-minute clip opens up by showing men of varying ages and ethnicities staring into the mirror, before the narrator asking the question: 'Is this the best a man can get?', turning its former brand mantra on its head.

As the ad rolls on, it shows both negative and positive sides of supposedly 'masculine' behaviour, from bullying and harassment, sexual misconduct, 'mansplaining' and violence, to men standing up for sexual violence victims and acting as excellent father figures.

The video faces the Me Too movement head on as a brand which has a predominantly male audience, and regularly aimed its former ad campaigns at gruff, typically 'masculine' men.

Many viewers felt that the advert accepted its vital responsibility in speaking to their target audience, considering men have been notoriously at the heart of sexual assault allegations.

One especially poignant part of the clip shows Terry Crews speaking out about sexual assault, crucially standing up for both male and female survivors and their Bill of Rights.

On the one hand, Gillette's message slightly missed the mark by tarring an entire gender with mostly the same brush, though it did show varying 'types' of men. Some say the advert is capitalising on the #MeToo Movement, others say it's complete chastisement.

The reception has been extremely mixed, with some of the target audience (all men) wanting to go as far as boycotting the brand forever, and others praising it immensely.

One infamously vocal *cough* vile *cough* public figure to comment on it is, of course, Piers Morgan.

The deplorable King of 'Boys will be boys' rhetoric himself has been arguing with members of the public ALL THE LIVELONG DAY on Twitter, claiming man-hating 'feminazis' are waging a war against men through advertising. As if advertising in essence isn't inherently waging a war against women. But whatever.

(Let it be clear: Anyone who equates feminism with man-hating has absolutely zero notion of what feminism means. Feminists hate the patriarchy, not men themselves. They are two different things. Thus ends the public announcement services for today)

Why has the advert received such an angry response?

Many viewers believe that Gillette's efforts have created a video full of preaching, which isn't totally untrue. The video may have missed the mark with it's tone, after all, women know all about what condescension feels like.

We experience patronising behaviour on a daily basis in the workplace, among other settings. It never teaches us the lesson it's attempting to, which for me is the main problem with the ad.

I mean, the clip showing a line of men, standing behind BBQs with smoke wafting up from their grills, reciting “boys will be boys will be boys will be boys"? It's a bit obvious.

That being said, the ad didn't even show the worst aspects of the patriarchy, the worst of the predators, the horrors many women face every single day. It didn't even go that far when we think about it from this perspective, but yet thousands are saying it went more than far enough.

However, the ruthlessly aggressive response by some users to the video clip, in one way, reiterates the point.

While I don't believe all men (or women) should be tarred with the same brush, I do believe that the defensive backlash shows the toxicity of the defensive feminist-fearing aggressive male dialogue.

Like many women and men have said, only those who have done something wrong should be afraid of the Me Too era.

By becoming an ally for sexual assault survivors, by proving you believe in equality, by acknowledging the pain which survivors of sexist behaviour and sexual violence have undergone, by lifting up women and minorities such as the LGBT+ and trans communities; only then will society believe that you aren't part of the problem.

It's time for a lot of men to stand up and prove themselves; just because you haven't done anything wrong in the past doesn't mean that you can't stand up for what's right when it matters. And in today's Me Too society, it really matters.

Seeing a massively popular brand attempt to start a conversation is encouraging for most of us, despite the fact that the ad was overdone and the tone was slightly missed.

The male demographic clearly felt attacked by the ad (um, hello, EVERY MEDIA ADVERT makes women feel like sh*t about ourselves so now you understand how it feels) despite the fact that it was arguably trying to encourage them to better themselves for their own benefit.

Let's not forget that toxic masculinity is harmful to men as well as women. While men are the perpetrators of 90% of violent crime in America, they are also 70% of the victims of violent crime. They are also four times more likely to commit suicide.

By facing the aggression and violence inherent in society, men find gain too, yet so many of them are too angered by the ad to see that it isn't trying to attack them personally.

President of Procter & Gamble, owners of Gillette, stated that;

"By holding each other accountable, eliminating excuses for bad behaviour, and supporting a new generation working towards their personal 'best,' we can help create positive change that will matter for years to come."

No doubt Gillette anticipated a backlash to the clip, but all publicity is good publicity as the saying goes.

Gillette has collaborated with the Building A Better Man project, which aims to reduce violent behaviour in men, and The Boys and Girls Club of America, which helps young men develop better communication skills.

The company is also donating $1m a year to US charities who work to support men over the next three years.

It has to be said that their efforts deserve praise, since #MeToo began there has been a shocking amount of defensive commentary from groups of men as opposed to constructive conversations and support for women and minorities suffering at the hands of the patriarchy.

Gillette has rarely found itself in the midst of controversy, but today everyone is talking about them.

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In what can only be described as completely iconic, Miley Cyrus belts out Santa Baby with a twist.

Ditching the old lyrics for a much better-updated version, Miley took centre stage with Jimmy Fallon and Mark Ronson.

Miley takes on feminist issues such as sexual harassment in work, d*ck pics and equal pay.

Instead of asking Santa for all the gifts, the 26-year-old insists that she's more than capable of paying her own way – YAS GAL.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Bringing the Christmas classic into 2018, Miley has something else in mind for the big man in the red suit.

Her lyrics ring out: "Listen Santa to what I say, a girl's best friend is equal pay."

"So stop interrupting me when I talk and don't text me pictures of your…" she adds, before being cut off by Mark's phone ringing.

Addressing the issue of unwanted touching, she belted out: "Santa baby, I'd love to know my ass won't get grabbed at work, by some ignorant jerk." 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Miley's version of the song is just incredible from start to finish.

Watch the whole thing here – you won't be disappointed.

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These dark, gloomy evenings are really draining and we have to admit we never have the energy to go out once we clock off from work.

This winter we’ve been making the most of our book collections and have spent many evenings curled up by the fire with nothing but a good book for company.

The list of benefits associated with reading is never-ending, but our favourite one is simple- the escapism.

Distracting your mind for a few chapters where you can escape to different worlds and meet new people all from the comfort of your sofa is so tranquil.

We decided to support our fellow ladies by putting together a list our favourite books by female authors.

We’re sure you’ll love these books just as much as we do.

1: Ritual for Every Day by Nadia Narain and Katia Narain Phillips (Hutchinson)

We all feel that desire a calmer, more spacious way of living, but we’re often unsure exactly how to step off the crazy treadmill of day-to-day routines and responsibilities. Nadia and Katia have learned through years of practice that simple rituals can help you press the pause button on the pace of modern life. In Rituals for Every Day, they share their easy-to-follow advice, step-by-step. Let the riyals bring you back to yourself.

2: Thanks, Penneys! by Valerie Loftus (Mercier)

Have you ever been in Penneys on a Saturday and felt like you were in a scene from The Hunger Games? Have you ever gone in just to get a pair of tights and come out with fake tan, a pair of glittery platforms and some fluffy pyjamas? Have you ever spent hours there trying to root out a pair of knickers that doesn’t have ‘NETFLIX AND CHILL’ written on the bum? If so, then this is the book for you. From the chaos of changing rooms to the questionable delights of the lingerie section. Thanks, Penneys! is a love letter to an Irish institution that is an integral part of all our lives.

3: The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur (Andrew Mcmeel Publishing)

Rupi Kaur’s second book is divided into five sections reflecting the life cycle of a flower, with chapters titled: Wilting, Falling, Rooting, Rising, and Blooming. It focuses on themes of love and loss, trauma and abuse, healing, femininity and the body. Wilting touches on the subject of heartbreak and loss. Falling focuses on depressive feelings following the loss of an important relationship. Rooting explores topics of female infanticide, immigration and borders. Blooming addresses the joy Kaur finally found coming to love and accept her roots, herself, and the world around her. She also comes to realize her mission in this world: equality and love for all genders, races and backgrounds.

4: I Found My Tribe by Ruth Fitzmaurice (Vintage Publishing)

Ruth's tribe are her lively children and her filmmaker husband, Simon, who has Motor Neurone Disease and can only communicate with his eyes. Ruth's other 'tribe' are the friends who gather at the cove in Greystones, Co. Wicklow, and regularly throw themselves into the freezing cold water, just for kicks. 'The Tragic Wives' Swimming Club', as they jokingly call themselves, meet to cope with the extreme challenges life puts in their way, not to mention the monster waves rolling over the horizon. An invocation to all of us to love as hard as we can, and live even harder, I Found My Tribe is an urgent and uplifting letter to a husband, family, friends, the natural world and the brightness of life.   
 

5: And Life Lights Up by Alice Taylor (O'Brien Press Ltd)

Let Alice Taylor encourage you to live in the now, to really live your experiences and to treasure the special moments in your life. With Alice as a guide, explore the steps and ways to live a conscious life and focus on the goodness of the world around us. Alice's beautiful and captivating writing is an act of mindfulness in itself, and she shares her favourite moments in life, encouraging us to ponder our own. Alice also inspires the reader to be attentive to the here and now and embrace moments as they arise. A beautiful and enchanting book by a bestselling and celebrated author. 

6: Ice Cream for Breakfast by Laura Jane Williams (Hodder and Stoughton)

Full of spirit and un-self-conscious enthusiasm, Ice Cream for Breakfast: Child-Like Solutions to Bullsh*t Adult Problems is the permission slip all too-grown-up-for-their-own-good-but-secretly-scared-of-adulting adults need to locate their inner-child nestled deep within so that we might all relax enough to laugh harder, wonder more, and marvel at magic on the daily.

7: Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg (Edbury Publishing)

In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg – Facebook COO and one of Fortune magazine's Most Powerful Women in Business – draws on her own experience of working in some of the world's most successful businesses and looks at what women can do to help themselves, and make small changes in their life that can effect change on a more universal scale.

8: The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin (Harper Collins Publishers)

The author of the bestselling 40 Ways to Look at Winston Churchill has produced a work that is "a cross between the Dalai Lama's The Art of Happiness and Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love." The Happiness Project describes one person's year-long attempt to discover what leads to true contentment. Drawing at once on cutting-edge science, classical philosophy, and real-world applicability, Rubin has written an engaging, eminently relatable chronicle of transformation.   

9: Normal People by Sally Rooney (Faber and Faber)

Normal People follows the lives of Connell and Marianne, who come from the same town but are part of very different worlds.

When they start studying at Trinity College they develop such a strong bond that carries on into the future. Normal People looks at the hearty theme of how love can change a person. It opens readers’ eyes to the massive impact love and a relationship can have on a person. Plus, can you ever go wrong with a love story set in Dublin? We are so ready to dive into the pages of Sally Rooney’s second fictional triumph.

10: Help Me! by Marianne Power (Pan Macmillan)

Marianne Power spent one year of her life practising the advice from self-help books to see if they really do what they say on the cover. The books promise to make us better people. They vow to transform us into upbeat, organised souls who go for jogs at 7 am in the morning and always have perfectly ironed clothes, but Marianne realises that maybe the help they’re offering isn’t as beneficial as it may seem.

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The Bernard Shaw is a well-known site for political activism: murals dedicated to Savita Halappanavar, the Repeal Movement and the homelessness crisis have appeared in recent times alone.

This week saw a spark of anger which turned into a flame following a controversial Cork rape trial in which a female barrister named Elizabeth O'Connell used a 17-year-old woman's underwear as evidence against her.

As a result, #thisisnotconsent protests took place all over the country, with women and men marching with 'I Believe Her' banners in the air.

The Bernard Shaw's latest activist art piece is dedicated to the young woman whose 27-year-old alleged attacker was acquitted of rape following Elizabeth O'Connell's finishing statement.

The barrister urged the jury of eight men and four women to consider the woman's underwear, which happened to be a lace thong, claiming that the woman "was attracted to the defendant and was open to meeting someone and being with someone".

The Richmond Street South mural shows painted images of various shapes and sizes of underwear, with each branded with the words 'Not Asking For It.' The work was created by Emma Blake, a street artist and graphic designer, also known as Estr.

The mural's appearance is in support of the solidarity rallies which took place this week, urging the government to change the way in which rape trials are conducted.

Women's rights group ROSA wrote that the judicial consideration of the girl's underwear  as evidence was a "disgrace".

ROSA also stated: "These lines of character accusation and victim blaming are unfortunately a common tactic used in cases before the courts relating to sexual violence."

"The judiciary has proven itself time and time again to be utterly damaging to survivors of sexual violence to seek justice."

 Let's hope these crucial protests lead to the necessary changes to Irish law regarding sexual violence.

Feature image: Channel NewsAsia

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Little Mix are known for lots of things – their catchy lyrics, girl power and super supportive friendships that they have with each other. 

They have long been on the receiving end of criticism  for their revealing stage attire and it looks like they have had enough of it now. 

The pop group, made up of Jade Thirlwall, Perrie Edwards, Leigh-Anne Pinnock and Jesy Nelson, got candid in an interview about their sexy outfits and how the backlash they get shows serious double standards. 

The X Factor-winning group made the point that Olympic athlete's are never getting attacked by the media or trolls on social media for wearing skimpy clothes.

But they do, because they are dancing.  

Many people have slammed what they wear when they perform on stage as ''provocative'' but the girls aren't planning on changing any time soon. 

Jesy said, ''you should be able to be whatever kind of woman you want to be. You should be able to wear what you bloody want to wear and rock it.''

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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She continued, ''as long as you feel good about yourself, that's all that matters. It just annoys me. We'll wear a leotard and they're like [pulls a face].''

They compared what they wear to Olympians, who are also usually clad in similar costumes. 

Jesy said, ''but ​​I'm thinking, 'Do you say that to people at the Olympics, that they're too provocative?' No you don't, but because we're dancing, 'Oh, you're too sexy'."

Jade says that they are all feminists, but that doesn't have anything to do with how they dress. 

She said, ''being a feminist doesn't mean that you have to wear a polo-neck jumper and a pair of trousers. Anyone can be a feminist. Feminism is just believing in equality.'' 

We think they look fab and fierce – don't change gals. 

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