HomeTagsPosts tagged with "am reading"

am reading

The Hunger Games books were a massive part of my childhood so it’s safe to say my heart skipped a beat when I found out that author Suzanne Collins has penned a prequel to the bestselling series.

The name of the book has yet to be released and it is currently referred to as Untitled Panem Novel.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Hunger Games (@thehungergames) on

The untitled prequel will be set 64 years before the events of The Hunger Games. The tale will take place in Panem on the morning of the reaping of the tenth Hunger Games.

Suzanne Collins opened up about the fourth installment in the beloved series that had readers gripped in the early noughties.

Image result for the hunger games books tumblr
Photo: Tumblr

“With this book, I wanted to explore the state of nature, who we are, and what we perceive is required for our survival. The reconstruction period ten years after the war, commonly referred to as the Dark Days—as the country of Panem struggles back to its feet—provides fertile ground for characters to grapple with these questions and thereby define their views of humanity.”

Image result for katniss everdeen gif

We can’t wait to get our hands on a copy of The Hunger Games prequel.

The book is set to be published on May 19, 2020.

Feature Image: Favim

Trending

The untimely passing of Irish author Emma Hannigan broke the hearts of the nation but the talented writer’s spirit will forever live on in the pages of her stories.

In 2007, Emma was diagnosed with breast cancer and her eleven-year battle with cancer began. In February 2018, Emma shared that her team of dedicated doctors had exhausted all avenues in terms of her treatment.

Emma tragically passed away on February 28, 2018, and on her one year anniversary, Hachette Ireland published her final novel and it comes as no surprise to see it soar through the bestsellers list.

The final novel from the beloved and inspiring Emma Hannigan is a life-affirming, uplifting story that celebrates the strength and joys of female friendship.

Kingfisher Road- a leafy, peaceful in the town of Vayhill. But there are whispers behind closed doors. Who is moving into Number 10? Danielle appears to her new neighbours to have a perfect, glossy life. But not everything is as it seems… In fact, each of the other four women who live close by has a secret and each is nursing their own private heartache.

But could a gift be waiting on their doorsteps? And, by opening their front doors, and their hearts, to each other, could the women of Kingfisher Road discover all the help they need?

If there is one book you are going to purchase this month then make it The Gift of Friends by Emma Hannigan. The heartwarming and eye-opening tale will teach you so many valuable lessons that you’ll hold close to your heart for many years after you finish Emma’s final book.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Hachette Ireland (@hachetteireland) on

Breast Cancer Ireland and Emma’s family are launching a new drive to continue Emma’s legacy of raising funds to support research efforts. Her dad, Philip Hannigan said: “Emma was very clear that every effort should be made to support ongoing research into breast cancer so that no other family would have to suffer a loss like this.”

Breast Cancer Ireland raises significant funding for research into breast cancer as well as promoting education and awareness on the importance of breast health amongst women of all ages.

To make a €4 donation text CURE to 50300 or go to www.breastcancerireland.com.

Feature Image: Hachette Ireland

Trending

Self-help books have been growing in popularity over the past decade and we can’t help but wonder do they actually work?

The shelves of bookstores are now jampacked with titles about the best ways to improve your life; from diets that will make you happier to ways to cut out toxic people from your life.

It’s safe to say there isn’t a lack of advice out there, but do these books stay true to their promise?

Illustration: Lisk Feng

When it comes to Love For Imperfect Things, the answer is yes.

The second novel by Zen Buddhist Haemin Sunim is the one book you just need to add to your to-read list in 2019.

The uplifting and beautifully-illustrated book is full of nuggets of wisdom that you’ll carry with you long after you’ve finished reading.

You know that feeling when you curl up on the sofa with a cup of warm tea after a long, draining day at work? That’s the feeling you get when you read Love For Imperfect Things.

It lifts you up with positive yet honest advice that is actually easy to incorporate into your day-to-day life.

Each chapter is full of reassuring tales and pages of encouraging quotes that will help you through each day.

Love For Imperfect Things was my companion on dull train journeys to the office for the past week and I found that even reading a mere 10 pages helped boost my spirits on rainy mornings and gloomy evenings.

The words of Haemin Sunim were comforting and heartwarming. The stories he shares are personal which help you accept the advice he shares far easier than your average self-help book.

Love For Imperfect Things shares realistic advice that will truly help you accept the person you are instead of pressuring yourself to be the perfect, flawless person the world expects you to be.

The book doesn’t force you to take up eccentric hobbies or to try obscene diets, it simply encourages you to be kind to yourself. Something we can all admit we neglect at the best of times.

Illustration: Lisk Feng

It is a book you will turn to in times of doubt, worry and fear. It will give you the guidance and reassurance you desperately need on the good and bad days.

Love For Imperfect Things by Haemin Sunim is published by Penguin Life. Treat yourself to a copy for €12.99 from all good bookstores.

Feature Image: Haemin Sunim Instagram

Trending

These dark, gloomy evenings are really draining and we have to admit we never have the energy to go out once we clock off from work.

This winter we’ve been making the most of our book collections and have spent many evenings curled up by the fire with nothing but a good book for company.

The list of benefits associated with reading is never-ending, but our favourite one is simple- the escapism.

Distracting your mind for a few chapters where you can escape to different worlds and meet new people all from the comfort of your sofa is so tranquil.

We decided to support our fellow ladies by putting together a list our favourite books by female authors.

We’re sure you’ll love these books just as much as we do.

1: Ritual for Every Day by Nadia Narain and Katia Narain Phillips (Hutchinson)

We all feel that desire a calmer, more spacious way of living, but we’re often unsure exactly how to step off the crazy treadmill of day-to-day routines and responsibilities. Nadia and Katia have learned through years of practice that simple rituals can help you press the pause button on the pace of modern life. In Rituals for Every Day, they share their easy-to-follow advice, step-by-step. Let the riyals bring you back to yourself.

2: Thanks, Penneys! by Valerie Loftus (Mercier)

Have you ever been in Penneys on a Saturday and felt like you were in a scene from The Hunger Games? Have you ever gone in just to get a pair of tights and come out with fake tan, a pair of glittery platforms and some fluffy pyjamas? Have you ever spent hours there trying to root out a pair of knickers that doesn’t have ‘NETFLIX AND CHILL’ written on the bum? If so, then this is the book for you. From the chaos of changing rooms to the questionable delights of the lingerie section. Thanks, Penneys! is a love letter to an Irish institution that is an integral part of all our lives.

3: The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur (Andrew Mcmeel Publishing)

Rupi Kaur’s second book is divided into five sections reflecting the life cycle of a flower, with chapters titled: Wilting, Falling, Rooting, Rising, and Blooming. It focuses on themes of love and loss, trauma and abuse, healing, femininity and the body. Wilting touches on the subject of heartbreak and loss. Falling focuses on depressive feelings following the loss of an important relationship. Rooting explores topics of female infanticide, immigration and borders. Blooming addresses the joy Kaur finally found coming to love and accept her roots, herself, and the world around her. She also comes to realize her mission in this world: equality and love for all genders, races and backgrounds.

4: I Found My Tribe by Ruth Fitzmaurice (Vintage Publishing)

Ruth's tribe are her lively children and her filmmaker husband, Simon, who has Motor Neurone Disease and can only communicate with his eyes. Ruth's other 'tribe' are the friends who gather at the cove in Greystones, Co. Wicklow, and regularly throw themselves into the freezing cold water, just for kicks. 'The Tragic Wives' Swimming Club', as they jokingly call themselves, meet to cope with the extreme challenges life puts in their way, not to mention the monster waves rolling over the horizon. An invocation to all of us to love as hard as we can, and live even harder, I Found My Tribe is an urgent and uplifting letter to a husband, family, friends, the natural world and the brightness of life.   
 

5: And Life Lights Up by Alice Taylor (O'Brien Press Ltd)

Let Alice Taylor encourage you to live in the now, to really live your experiences and to treasure the special moments in your life. With Alice as a guide, explore the steps and ways to live a conscious life and focus on the goodness of the world around us. Alice's beautiful and captivating writing is an act of mindfulness in itself, and she shares her favourite moments in life, encouraging us to ponder our own. Alice also inspires the reader to be attentive to the here and now and embrace moments as they arise. A beautiful and enchanting book by a bestselling and celebrated author. 

6: Ice Cream for Breakfast by Laura Jane Williams (Hodder and Stoughton)

Full of spirit and un-self-conscious enthusiasm, Ice Cream for Breakfast: Child-Like Solutions to Bullsh*t Adult Problems is the permission slip all too-grown-up-for-their-own-good-but-secretly-scared-of-adulting adults need to locate their inner-child nestled deep within so that we might all relax enough to laugh harder, wonder more, and marvel at magic on the daily.

7: Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg (Edbury Publishing)

In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg – Facebook COO and one of Fortune magazine's Most Powerful Women in Business – draws on her own experience of working in some of the world's most successful businesses and looks at what women can do to help themselves, and make small changes in their life that can effect change on a more universal scale.

8: The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin (Harper Collins Publishers)

The author of the bestselling 40 Ways to Look at Winston Churchill has produced a work that is "a cross between the Dalai Lama's The Art of Happiness and Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love." The Happiness Project describes one person's year-long attempt to discover what leads to true contentment. Drawing at once on cutting-edge science, classical philosophy, and real-world applicability, Rubin has written an engaging, eminently relatable chronicle of transformation.   

9: Normal People by Sally Rooney (Faber and Faber)

Normal People follows the lives of Connell and Marianne, who come from the same town but are part of very different worlds.

When they start studying at Trinity College they develop such a strong bond that carries on into the future. Normal People looks at the hearty theme of how love can change a person. It opens readers’ eyes to the massive impact love and a relationship can have on a person. Plus, can you ever go wrong with a love story set in Dublin? We are so ready to dive into the pages of Sally Rooney’s second fictional triumph.

10: Help Me! by Marianne Power (Pan Macmillan)

Marianne Power spent one year of her life practising the advice from self-help books to see if they really do what they say on the cover. The books promise to make us better people. They vow to transform us into upbeat, organised souls who go for jogs at 7 am in the morning and always have perfectly ironed clothes, but Marianne realises that maybe the help they’re offering isn’t as beneficial as it may seem.

Image result for help me marianne power

Trending

The homeless crisis in Ireland seems to be worsening as more and more families are struggling to afford rent or in worse cases, can’t even keep a roof over their heads.

We can donate to homeless charities and throw a few euros into the cup of a homeless person sitting on O’Connell bridge, but we will never truly understand how difficult it is unless it happens to us.

A Thousand Roads Home by Carmel Harrington opened my eyes about the sheer heartache homeless people face on a day-to-day basis.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HarperCollinsIre (@harpercollinsire) on

This book made me realise just how lucky I am to go home to my warm house in Drimnagh. I’m sure we’re all guilty of complaining about our home. The wallpaper is too old-fashioned. The carpet looks grubby. My room is too small.

But we really have no right to do so, especially when people are sleeping on park benches and in run-down ‘boutique’ hotels.

The story of Ruth and DJ will move you and give you a well-needed reality check.

The single mother and her son never truly fit in, but they never cared about that, once they were always together.

When their home comes under threat, their quiet lives will change forever.

This tale will show you the harrowing realities of homelessness in Ireland. Too many people in our country are fighting similar battles to Ruth and DJ and Tom.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Carmel Harrington (@happymrsh) on

DJ struggles to do his homework in his hotel bedroom, just like many other Irish pupils.

Ruth lives in fear of losing her job because she doesn’t have a stable home, just like many other Irish mothers.

Tom has become one of Dublin’s invisible, just like the many people we fail to notice as we rush down the city streets.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kat O'Connor (@katoconnorr) on

Everyone has felt like an outsider at some point in their lives, this is the book to make you feel like you belong.

Carmel Harrington’s words will stick with you long after you finish the final page of this book. The lesson A Thousand Roads Home teaches you is one that’ll stay in your heart for a very long time.

A Thousand Roads Home by Carmel Harrington is published by Harper Collins. It will be released on October 18, 2018.

Trending

We all recognise a part of ourselves in fictional female characters, whether that’s Bridget Jones and her goofy personality or Katniss Everdeen and her loyalty to her family and friends.

However, I don’t think us Irish women relate to anyone as much as Aisling, the protagonist in the best-selling book Oh My God, What a Complete Aisling.

Aisling’s story continues in the sequel The Importance of Being Aisling and reading the second instalment felt like I was reuniting with an old friend.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gill Books (@gillbooks) on

Her obsession with The Corrs, her lunchtime trip to Dunnes Stores to find a new ‘shumper’ and her determination to never miss a free hotel brekkie makes Aisling one of the most real female fictional characters.

After quite the emotional year things seem to be getting back on track for Aisling. She’s been enjoying many a glass of Pinot Greej with Sadhbh and co., she’s become accustomed to Dublin’s brunch addiction and she's even rekindled her romance with John.

However, she is still struggling to deal with the loss of her dear Daddy as Aisling, Mammy and her brother Paul are facing their first Christmas without him.

Anyone who has lost a family member knows just how hard that first Christmas is. Ever the positive person, Aisling seeks joy in the little things like Auntie Shelia’s famous stuffing and doing the ‘Big Shop’ in the new Aldi with Mammy, but that heartache is still there, which makes this book that little bit more personable.

Us Irish aren’t known for expressing our feelings and this is perfectly portrayed in the way Aisling and her family deal with Christmas without Daddy. The secret tears and unfulfilled traditions are oh so relatable for many readers.

What I adore most about Aisling is her ability to see the light in even the darkest of moments. Her “Ah sure, it’ll be grand” attitude is infectious in this tale and part of me felt proud of her for continuing on despite the hurdles life throws at her.

When things at PensionsPlus go awry, Aisling has no choice but to abandon her life in Dublin. She returns home to Mammy and That Bloody Cat, but before she knows it she's planning an escape route when life in Ballygobbard is too much to handle.

Aisling jets off to Las Vegas with Majella and Sadhbh in tow and the trip gives her the confidence boost that shows Aisling she’s capable of a hell of a lot more than she ever gave herself credit for.

The Importance of Being Aisling is full or warmth and that unique Irish wit. It'll be a comfort to you on those dreary Autumn evenings and your best companion on your commute to work

The Importance Of Being Aisling: Country Roads, Take Her Home by Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen is published by Gill Books.

You can pick up your very own copy here.

Trending

There are many books out there that helped mould me into the person I am today, but my latest read Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig has opened my eyes more than any other book.

The best-selling author analyses our relationship with the Internet and how it affects our mental health.

Matt is often vocal about his mental health struggles, which is something I admire most about the author.

 

A post shared by Kat O'Connor (@katoconnorr) on

His honesty is heavy at times, but necessary. He filled Notes on a Nervous Planet with words of wisdom that are bound to change the way you view the world.

I simply couldn’t put the book down, it was practically glued to my hands for 24 hours.

As someone who struggles with mental health issues, I found Matt Haig’s honesty reassuring and comforting. His words made me, and many others, realise that you are not alone in your battle.

One of the most thought-provoking parts of the book is the chapter in which Matt discusses the pressure we put on ourselves to do everything. He advises readers to change the way they think about what we can do in life.

We often worry about the things we’ll never get to do, but he urged us to focus on what we can achieve and what we can enjoy.

“To enjoy life, we might have to stop thinking about what we will never be able to read and watch and say and do, and start to think of how to enjoy the world within our boundaries.”

We need to cut ourselves some slack. Sure there are millions of movies to watch and books to read and places to visit. Realistically, we’ll never be able to visit every single place or tune into every single movie, but what we can do is revel in the ones we do have time for.

 

A post shared by Kat O'Connor (@katoconnorr) on

Maybe I’ll never visit Asia or Texas.

Maybe I’ll never get time to read War and Peace or Lord of the Flies.

Maybe I’ll never watch Star Wars or The Princess Bride.

However, this book helped me accept that we just can’t do everything in our time on this nervous planet and that is perfectly fine.

You can purchase a copy of Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig here.

Trending

Happy Book Lovers Day, fellow bookworms. It’s one of the greatest days of the year where we can gush about our literary loves even more than we usually do.

There are so many things I wanted to write about for this week’s book piece, from my all time favourite books to reasons why you should read more.

However, I decided to pen a love letter to the literary world and talk about why being a bookworm is one of the most wonderful things.

Without further ado, here are The Perks of Being a Bookworm:

Sense of comfort:

Nothing warms my heart more than curling up in my room, switching my fairy lights on and reading a book. There’s something so soothing about taking a break from the world and diving into a different place, meeting new people and learning about their lives all from the comfort of your own reading zone, whether that’s your bedroom, a local cafe or your neighbourhood library. Reading offers the greatest sense of comfort and helps you escape the dull realities of everyday life.

Visiting bookshops:

Bookshops are a safe haven for so many people. They offer a sense of serenity from the hectic hustle and bustle of the city. I could easily spend hours scouring the shelves in dinky little bookshops. The peace and tranquility the stores offer also help me when I’m feeling anxious. They act as a safe place when the city can seem a tad daunting. They may be my favourite place to visit, but I’m afraid I can’t say the same for my bank account because I never fail to leave without purchasing at least one book, it’s impossible.

The perfect company:

It’s sad but true, people are feeling lonelier than ever before. Loneliness is affecting so many people all around the world for a variety of reasons. Whether it’s something as simple as not having enough time to socialise or a deeper reason like anxiety preventing you from leaving the house. Luckily, books can be a huge comfort if you are feeling pretty lonesome. You could delve into a timeless classic like Frankenstein and learn about Victor Frankenstein and his complicated mind, or perhaps unwind with the beautiful words of Rupi Kaur’s poetry in Milk and Honey.

Characters like Bridget Jones,Tracy Beaker, Matilda Wormwood and Katniss Everdeen quickly became part of my world throughout some of the dullest times in my life, and you’ll certainly feel comforted by the characters amongst the pages of whatever book you pick up.

“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counsellors, and the most patient of teachers" – Charles William Eliot.

Trending

I wandered into one of my favourite bookstores on Friday and within minutes I had three books in my arms. I continued to scour the shelves despite the stack of books I was ready to buy.

It’s impossible for me to leave a bookshop empty handed. I am the ultimate bookworm and can’t just browse through the shelves.

There’s always a new release that catches my eye or a classic tale that I’ve been meaning to read forever.

I easily could’ve spent a small fortune in that bookshop because there are dozens of incredible new stories out at the moment.

If you’re on the hunt for a new read then look no further. I’ll be splurging on the following books this month and you should too. They’re just too good to leave on the shelves.

The Weight of a Thousand Feathers by Brian Conoghan:

I think it’s important to remember that anyone can read YA books. We should never underestimate these tales just because they’re aimed at young adults. In my opinion, the genre is one of the strongest and most moving. Some of my favourite books hail from the YA section and will continue to do so for many years to come. I spotted The Weight of a Thousand Feathers in store thanks to the striking cover, but what really peaked my interest was the question the book explores- what lengths will we go to for the people we love?

Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig:

I have oodles of respect for author Matt Haig and his ability to discuss mental health disorders in such an honest way. His book Reasons To Stay Alive holds a very special place in my heart, so I was thrilled to see his latest release sitting on the best-sellers shelf this week. Notes on a Nervous Planet focuses on how to be happy on a planet that makes us feel alone, anxious and nervous. Matt Haig looks into the public’s desire to constantly be connected to the digital world and the impact it is having on our mental health.

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay:

My best friend purchased this book at the end of our trip to Scotland and flew through it by the time we touched down in Dublin airport. I’m a Grey’s Anatomy addict, so anything medical related fascinates me (I blame McSteamy and McDreamy) so this book soared to the top of my books to-buy list. Adam Kay gives readers a brutally honest look at life as a junior doctor and what life is really like on and off the hospital ward.

Trending

You’ll be surprised by the number of movies that have actually been inspired by books, from Me Before You to Trainspotting. Some of the greatest big screen hits have been adapted from novels, and manage to do the book justice more often than not.

However, there’s something special about reading the story before seeing it unfold on the big screen. 

What I love about book to film adaptations is putting a face to the characters you’ve loved for so long. Yes, you may know how the film is going to end, but seeing those characters come to life in the cinema is such a special feeling. It also helps you connect with them more, because they’re no longer just descriptions on a page.

The familiarity of the story, the plot and the characters can also be a huge source of comfort for bookworms when watching their beloved tales on the big screen.

Today, I wanted to recommend a book that left me in floods of tears, but one I hold very close to my heart. It’s due to be made into a film in 2019, starring Elle Fanning, and you must read it before it’s cinematic release.

All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven:

What can I say about this book other than WOW. The young adult novel by the incredible Jennifer Niven is without a doubt one of the greatest books I’ve read. The way Jennifer writes about bipolar disorder, the importance of friendship and the fear of being judged is so striking.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

All The Bright Places follows the lives of Theodore Finch and Violet Markey. Theodore aka Finch is completely fascinated with death. Suicide is always on his mind, but little things always stop him from killing himself.

Violet Markey is struggling with the untimely death of her sister. She spends her days daydreaming about the future and aches to escape her hometown so she can start her life all over again.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

Violet and Finch meet on top of the ledge of the school’s bell tower. They quickly develop a friendship that finally lets them breathe for the first time and be who they’ve always wanted to be.

The pair decide to team up for a school project to discover the natural wonders’ of Indiana, but their wanderings teach them more about one another than their hometown.

Violet learns how to live in the moment through her friendship with Finch, but can her friendship keep him alive?

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

This novel will take hold of your heart from the very first page. The friendship between Finch and Violet is both mesmerising and heartbreaking. The constant discussion of mental health and suicide throughout this young adult novel is heavy, but necessary.

Author Jennifer Niven is in the pre-production stages of the movie, and is thankfully looking after the script.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

Elle Fanning has been cast as Violet, and the producers have found their Finch. Harry Styles, Charlie Heaton and Cole Sprouse have all been rumoured to be playing Finch, so keep your eyes peeled, but in the meantime read this glorious novel, and make sure you have plenty of tissues beside you.

All The Bright Places is published by Penguin Books Ltd and is available to buy here.

Feature image: Jennifer Nivan Instagram

Trending

I have been on the hunt for an empowering and honest collection of poetry ever since I read Rupi Kaur’s Milk and Honey.

Female poets are paving the way in the poetry world and I am beyond thrilled about it. There once was a time when female writers used male pen names, especially during the 19th century, because men dominated the publishing industry.

However, female writers like Rupi Kaur, Amanda Lovelace and K.Y Robinson have crafted such beautiful work that has earned them the respect in the industry that they truly deserve.

I’ve got great news for those of you who adore powerful and honest poetry. Charly Cox has released her first collection, and it is bound to leave you covered in goosebumps.

She Must Be Mad is a moving, raw and brutally honest collection about the trial and tribulations of life as a young woman in this modern world.

This collection of poetry is “for every woman surviving and thriving in today’s world, for every girl who feels too much; this is a call for communion, and you are not alone.”

 

A post shared by Charly Remy Cox (@charlycox1) on

The sense of comfort and support Charly offers through this collection will reassure the women who are battling through this crazy world.

The coming-of-age collection features topics that will tug on the heart strings of women across the globe, like the pressure to look perfect and the little insecurities that float around in your mind every day.

 

A post shared by Kat O'Connor (@katoconnorr) on

Charly’s wit will leave you smirking as you read, but her words will also hit you right in the pit of your stomach with the realisation that you’re not alone in this crazy world.

There’s an army of women out there fighting against the dull realities of this silly little thing called life and Charly perfectly captures what life is really like for the modern woman.

She Must Be Mad is published by Harper Collins and is available to buy here.

Trending

There’s nothing we love more than lounging around in the sun with a good book. Summer is the perfect time to climb out of your reading slump, and we’ve got a heap of recommendations for you.

These books will spark your love for reading and introduce you to an array of stories, a variety of characters and take you to plenty of places, all from the comfort of your sofa.

Eason has teamed up with best-selling author Sinéad Moriarty and broadcaster and book enthusiast Rick O’Shea to share their must-have books of the summer with you.

The Must Read series is every bookworm’s dream that features a wide range of genres from chilling thrillers and nail-biting ‘whodunnits’ to moving tales of parenthood and family.

This summer, ‘Sinéad and Rick’s Must Reads’ features a wide range of funny, emotional and thought-provoking titles, including:

I Still Dream by James Smythe

A rattling thriller and a story of love, family and loss which is also full of questions about what tech knows about us, where it’s going, and the terrible consequences that it all might have one day in the near future.

The Lost Letters of William Woolf by Helen Cullen

A wonderfully assured debut novel about falling in love, thinking that person is ‘the one’ and then starting to doubt the relationship you were once so sure of.

The Orchid and the Wasp by Caoilinn Hughes

A beautifully written story of two very different siblings from a rich family whose lives head in different directions after the economic crash of 2008. Nothing short of brilliant!

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

A brave, uncompromising and deeply affecting novel that questions what it’s like to be a Muslim in today’s modern world, and which also is a moving meditation on the tensions between religion and secularism.

Clock Dance by Anne Tyler

A beautifully crafted, bitter-sweet story about regret, empty nest syndrome, loneliness within a relationship and seeking purpose and fulfilment in life. Kick back and lose yourself in this gem of a novel.

Cornflakes for Dinner by Aidan Comerford

A funny, moving and ultimately, life-affirming book about the challenges of parenting two daughters with autism. Full of life, laughter, warmth and love, this wonderful book will pull at your heartstrings and make you laugh and cry.

Dear Mrs Bird by AJ Pearce

London, 1940. Emmy Lake mistakenly thinks she’s been hired as a War Correspondent, but the job turns out to be working as a typist for the intimidating advice columnist, Henrietta Bird. Funny, charming and warm, reading this book feels like you are being covered in a cosy blanket.

The Perfect Couple by Elin Hilderbrand

A brilliant ‘whodunnit’ set in the lavish background of Nantucket in the summer. With a beautiful setting, a wealthy family, a huge wedding, secrets, lies, covert affairs, and a dead body, this book is the perfect summer read.

 

Trending