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Being the eldest sibling isn’t easy. We often get blamed for everything, our siblings always steal our clothes and we had to put up with stricter rules when we were growing up.

However, our little brothers and sisters get away with murder.

A report has revealed that the second born child is more likely to be a troublemaker and we’re not one bit surprised.

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MIT economist, Joseph Doyle, has discovered that the second-born child is more likely to misbehave and it has a lot to do with how parents reared them.

The report revealed that second-born children are 25 to 40 percent more likely to get in major trouble in school and even with the law.

Experts believe that this has a lot to do with how strict parents are with their first born and how they tend to go easy on their second-born.

The child’s role models are also completely different to their big brother or sister.

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Doyle explained to NPR, “The firstborn has role models, who are adults. And the second, later-born children have role models who are slightly irrational 2-year-olds, you know, their older siblings.”

He added, “Both the parental investments are different, and the sibling influences probably contribute to these differences we see in the labor market and what we find in delinquency. It's just very difficult to separate those two things because they happen at the same time.”

Thanks for giving us another reason to love being the oldest, science!

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This may just boil your blood to dangerous levels. Many of us are well-used to cleaning up after ourselves, as well as the men around us.

New research has found that women who share a home with a male partner undertake the 'majority' of the household chores, which is unsurprising to most.

Researchers at University College London and Imperial College London have found that women still do most of the household duties when they live with a man, specifically 16 hours per week on tasks compared to the mere six that men carry out.

The Independent reported on the data, which was taken on 8513 heterosexual couples who lived together between the ages of 16 and 25 from 2010 until 2012 in the UK.

The findings of the UK Household Longitudinal Study can't be applied to queer couples or couples who don't live together.

The study was published in the journal Work, Employment and Society, and focused on a series of weekly work variables; hours spent at a paid job, hours spent caring for a child or adult and hours spent on chores.

The education of the participants and their attitudes towards gender roles were also examined.

The couples were divided into eight groups, based on the balance of paid and domestic work each partner carried out.

A range of people were included with different backgrounds such as low caregiving responsibilities, men who are the primary earner, women who are the breadwinners, women who do most of the household work, dual earners who shared caregiving responsibilities, women who work part-time and do domestic work, couples with men who work long hours, and unemployed couples with low caregiving responsibilities. 

It was found that women completed the majority of the domestic tasks in a shocking 93 percent of the couples surveyed.

When both partners worked full-time, women were FIVE TIMES more likely to spend 20 hours or more a week on chores.

50 percent of the couples examined had a "relatively egalitarian division of work," according to the authors of the study.

However, only two groups (seven percent of the couples) were seen to be the most egalitarian: a female earner who shared domestic work and couples in which men spent long hours on chores.

"The female-earner was the only group in which men’s contribution to the housework was similar to that of their partners, and this group had the highest proportion of women with educational qualifications higher than those of their partners," the study reads.

The authors concluded that in the UK, "gender equality in divisions of work is rare and gender norms remain strong."

Both partners need to share feminist ideals when it comes to household work being divided fairly, but a baby constantly thrust couples back into their old roles.

"The largest egalitarian groups in this study were less likely to have children," according to the data.

Gender disparities clearly still exist when it comes to care-giving and household duties, with domestic employment still mainly women in the workforce.

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The countdown to Christmas is officially underway and we’re feeling way too excited about it. We’ve been itching to watch our favourite festive films since the summertime but managed to hold off until after Halloween.

Now that November is here, we’ll happily tune into Love Actually, The Holiday, Home Alone and Elf every single evening.

Christmas movies never fail to make us smile so we’ll be watching as many as possible this winter.

Movies like The Grinch and Miracle on 34th Street always make us feel better and science has even found evidence to prove that watching Christmas movies is actually good for you.

Researchers have found that Christmas movies release feel-good hormones. They told DoYouRemember, “It does create that neurological shift that can produce happiness. I think anything that takes us out of our normal habituation, the normal day in, day out ,signals our senses, and then our senses measure if it’s pleasing or not. Christmas decorating will spike dopamine, a feel-good hormones.”

Christmas movies can also help lower stress and reduce anxiety levels, which is ideal as we approach one of the most hectic times of the year.

Watch Hugh Grant shimmy around 10 Downing Street or cry over It’s a Wonderful Life with your nearest and dearest this winter. After all, science says it’s good for your health.

If anyone needs us we’ll be watching The Muppet Christmas Carol for the foreseeable future.

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We all do it. Remember that absolutely mortifying thing you did seven years ago in school that you can't seem to shake off?

The anxiety of saying "you're welcome" instead of "thank you" when someone holds the door open for you, the sheer sweat-worthy fear of falling down (or up) the stairs on your bus, you name it, and we've worried about it.

We've always assumed that our furry little friends simply don't have these worries, but now SCIENCE (gasp) has disproved this, and we're shook. 

grim reaper wtf GIF by Studio Flox

The Royal Society scientific journal has published a study which supports the result that doggos struggle to nod off if they have anything troubling them, meaning that we're not as different as we think.

All that time that you lay in your bed, pondering that terrible moment when you asked your friend how their grand-dad up the North is getting on in his nursing home, and they reply that they are, in fact, deceased, leaving you stewing in shame.

The time in work that you were wandering around with your knickers tucked into the back of your skirt, the time you threw up at the local disco after one Blue WKD, even the time you said "keep the change" to the lad in Spar, and it was only a five cent coin.

Doggies apparently sit up and ponder their embarrassments and worries too, maybe they get anxiety about the lack of 'good boy' praise which they received that day.

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"Does my human still love me?" They think, as they rest their head on their paws, with a slow, violin concerto playing in the background.

"What if they actually don't like cleaning up my poop?"

"What if they send me to the pound and I get embroiled in the local gang war between the Pug Thugs and the Rottweiler Pilers?"

They stare glumly out of the rain-splattered window, tossing and turning following a negative experience at the dog walking park that day.

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The study stated that dogs tend to fall asleep much faster following a negative day, presumably to escape from the terrible consequences of the day.

We still think of the horrendously awkward things we were doing in 2005, forever looking up at the blank ceiling searching for answers…

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We've always suspected it, but now scientists have confirmed that dog owners are more likely to have better cardiovascular health.

The research was published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings and involved 1,769 people between 25 to 64-years-old, living in Brno in the Czech Republic.

Each participant had to provide information on their BMI, diet, physical activity levels, cholesterol, blood pressure, if they smoked or not and their fasting blood sugar levels.

42 percent of the candidates owned a pet of some sort, with 24 percent of people owning a dog and 17.9 percent owning another animal.

The American Heart Association heart score system test was used, looking at seven changeable risk factors of heart health.

Dog owners were more likely to exercise, have an ideal diet and blood glucose level than those who didn't, but they were more likely to smoke for some reason. They still scored better overall for cardiovascular health, however.

The study authors cautioned: "The higher smoking rates among dog ownership attenuates the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health."

Existing evidence links dog ownership to better mental and physical health, so it makes total sense.

Study co-author Andrea Maugeri commented in a statement: "In general, people who owned any pet were more likely to report more physical activity, better diet and blood sugar at ideal level.

"The greatest benefits from having a pet were for those who owned a dog, independent of their age, sex and education level."

Research claims that getting a pooch could be a useful way to boost heart health, and an important way to tackle the prevalence of heart disease.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the US alone, causing one-in-four deaths each year according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Senior investigator Francisco Lopez-Jimenez stated that owning dogs has previously been linked to better mental health and feeling less lonely, both of which are assumed to decrease the risk of heart attacks.

One study published in the journal BMC Psychiatry, which examined 17 existing papers concluded having a pet could help the symptoms of mental illness.

Philippa Hobson, senior cardiac nurse for the British Heart Foundation, told Newsweek: "Whether you're a pet-owner or not, physical activity can benefit your heart in lots of different ways.

"Just spending 10 minutes a day walking around the block is good for your heart health," she added,

Who could ever deny that having a pup is good for us?

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Good news, ladies!

Not only can red wine improve memory and boost fertility, but a new study has found that a glass of vino could actually do wonders for your pearly whites.

But wait? What about the stains?

I have to admit that this was the first question that popped into my head after discovering the research, but as it turns out, certain components of the beverage could help fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease.

Researchers at the American Chemical Society examined the effect of polyphenols, a chemical structure which is a known antioxidant, on oral health.

Results published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, showed that red wine actually reduces the ability of plaque-causing bacteria to stick to the teeth and gums – promoting an improvement in overall oral health.

The research also linked red wine to multiple health benefits including good bacteria in your gut and a lower risk of diabetes.

Not fond of the vino noir?

Not to worry, polyphenols can also be found in drinks such as coffee, green and black teas, and orange and lemon juice – but, just like most things, the positives will only be seen when consumed in moderation.

Cheers to that!

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We all know how wrecked you feel after a long day at the office. 

All you want is to take your bra off and get into bed to watch Netflix.

Some people adore their sleep – but what if you love sex too?

Could you give up your snoozing for getting it on? 

A study was carried out by Mattress Advisor, who surveyed people about their sleep and sex habits.

And what did they say?

Single people get more shut-eye and those in relationships have sex nearly three times more per month. 

People were happy to give up 54.3 minutes of sleep to have sex.

And even after an exhausting day, 84 percent of people would give up z's for a night-time romp. 

People in relationships were intimate an average of 8.7 days per month and they had an average of 7.7 hours of sleep per month. 

Single people slept 7.1 hours per night and had sex 6.2 days per month. 

It might seem like only 12 more minutes of sleep, but that adds up to almost an hour and a half of sleep during the week. 

So it seems the better the sex life, the better quality of sleep people get – like we needed an excuse, right?

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Who would have ever thought that getting 40 extra winks could make you skinnier?

A study from a research team at King's College London has found that sleeping more cuts down on sugar cravings.

Losing weight and sleeping in? This is a diet plan that sounds right up our alley!

In the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition-published study, the researchers examined what happened when they extended the amount of time people slept each night.

They found that when people slept longer, they ate about 10 grams less sugar each day than average levels of sugar intake. Participants who slept longer also reduced their carbohydrate consumption.

"The fact that extending sleep led to a reduction in intake of free sugars, by which we mean the sugars that are added to foods by manufacturers or in cooking at home as well as sugars in honey, syrups, and fruit juice, suggests that a simple change in lifestyle may really help people to consume healthier diets," principal investigator Dr. Wendy Hall noted.

In the study, 21 participants had sleep consultations in order to extend their visit to the land of nod by 90 minutes each night. These participants were all people who previously slept less than seven hours a night, the recommended minimum time adults should sleep.

The team also studied 21 other adults who also were getting less than seven hours' sleep as a control group.

The participants who received sleep consultations were advised to avoid caffeine before going to bed, start a relaxing night time routine and not go to bed feeling too full or hungry. They were also given a bedtime.

Their sleep patterns and diets were monitored for a week after, and the results were impressive.

86 percent of the people in the sleep consultation group increased their amount of time in bed, and half increased their actual time spent asleep, from 52 to almost 90 minutes. Those in the other group did not extend their time sleeping significantly.

However, it is thought that the extended sleep experienced by the group who received sleep advice may not have been of the best quality. The team suggested that any new sleep routine will take some time to get used to.

"Sleep duration and quality is an area of increasing public health concern and has been linked as a risk factor for various conditions. We have shown that sleep habits can be changed with relative ease in healthy adults using a personalised approach," lead researcher Haya Al Khatib, from the Department of Nutritional Sciences, stated.

"Our results also suggest that increasing time in bed for an hour or so longer may lead to healthier food choices. This further strengthens the link between short sleep and poorer quality diets that has already been observed by previous studies."

He continued that they hope to further examine nutrient intake and sleep patterns, especially in longer-term studies and populations that are at a higher risk of obesity or cardiovascular problems.

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We've all been there.

You're in a new job, doing your thing, when the hottie from finance walks by and leaves you a red-faced, spluttering mess. 

Workplace crushes are completely natural, and what's more, they could even be good for your health and well-being. 

Well, that's according to Jason Hughes, Founder of Leicester Centre for Psychodynamic anyway.

Speaking to Stylist, Jason explained how the butterfly feeling could actually help us feel better about ourselves. 

“We all want to feel good, crushes are our imaginative and creative way of identifying those things we prize in others, which we struggle to see in ourselves.”

He continued, “Crushes help us to feel alive, help us to feel, and help us to imagine – this is especially important when we might feel that we are trapped in a routine, stuck in a job or relationship where there is little new and vibrant.''

“Don’t ignore them, but pay careful attention to them and what they might be saying about you…”

And if you think your crushing days are behind you, think again. Those lustful feelings can reveal themselves when you least expect it, even in adulthood.

See, crushes stem from the same part of the brain believed to be responsible for drug addiction.

Imagine how many workplace romances we're missing out on while we work from home. It's quite tragic really…

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Every now and again, we read the results of scientific surveys and our blood boils enough that the steam contributes to global warming. This latest survey has succeeded in causing such rage.

Apparently, men spend HOURS hiding in the toilet from 'nagging wives', kids and household chores and suffer from a lack of 'me-time'. Really? Like, in all seriousness?

Considering they don't have to put in tampons or sanitary pads, we often wondered what can take some men so long in the bathroom, but now we know the answers. 

Men are viewing bathrooms as their safe haven from the chaos of family life, retreating to the sanctuary to escape chores. 

The study was conducted back in 2018 and it focused on the reasons why men hastily run away from their responsibilities to such a strange (and unhygienic…) part of the home.

According to the study, which surveyed 1000 male participants, men rack up seven hours of time spent in bathroom per year.

The reasons? They ran away from nagging partners, house chores, noisy children and also wanted the chance to use their phones in peace. Funny how mums don't get the same opportunity.

The study was commissioned by bathroom expert Pebble Grey, and discovered that one-in-10 bathroom visits would be interrupted. This adds up to 171 interruptions every year.

45 percent of the study's male participants said they rarely get any 'me time'. Among these men, a quarter of them stated that their partners aren't understanding of how hectic their lives actually are.

Somehow, we don't have sympathy considering women get paid less for their time and still have zero moments of self-care in their lives…

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Being moody is totally normal and now it looks like it is actually good for us!

A new study has found that those who swing on the pendulum of emotional intensity may be showing signs of a natural ability to adapt to change. 

The University College London has created a theory that moodiness helps to reinforce our responses to various environmental factors.

If an experience makes us happy, we are going to seek more of it. And in contrast, if an experience is unpleasant, it will likely bring us down. 

Being able to flip a switch when it comes to your reactions is beneficial in terms of survival, in both your social and work life. 

"The ubiquity of moods and the extent of their impact on our lives tells us that, throughout the course of evolution, our moodiness must have conferred a significant competitive advantage," said lead expert Dr Eran Eldar.

Now, the study did admit that being moody all the time can lead to depression, but Dr Eldar added that “being moody at times may be a small price to pay for the ability to adapt quickly when facing momentous environmental changes.”

Feel free to sulk about missing your bus or fume for a few minutes when your sister steals your favourite dress.

Science says it’s okay!

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How many times have you heard someone say, "sorry I can't, I'm on a low carb diet." – cue a serious eye-roll.

Hands up for the many times you've heard a family member, friend or co-worker say they're following an Atkins or Keto diet.

There is no denying that cutting carbs is a popular way to lose weight and to be fair, the majority of us have given it a go.

However, new research has provided us a reason to embrace the bagel, because scientists have found cutting carbs is shortening our lives.

Yes, you're miserable and you're actually doing more harm than good by avoiding your mum's potatoes.

The study published in the Lancet Public Health journal investigated the link between carbohydrate intake and mortality.

The research followed 15,400 Americans over 25 years and showed that a moderate cut in carbohydrates is much healthier than a dramatic one. 

The scientists collected data from participants' questionnaires which included portion size, and the food and drink they consumed. 

They then went onto estimate how many calories each person obtained from carbs, protein and fat.

However, before you raid the bread bin, moderation is key.

The study suggests that a diet both high and low in carbohydrates are associated with increased mortality.

Those who ate a moderate amount, which means 50–55 percent of their diet came from carbs, lived longer than those who followed high and low carb diets.

Scientists predicted that those in the moderate group had an extra four years of life on those who adopted an extra low-carb diet (less than 30 percent of their energy came from carbs.)

Compared to the low-carb group, moderate carb eaters were expected to enjoy a further 2.3 years of living (30-40 percent coming from carbs.)

And, as for the high-carb bunnies – those who got 65 percent or more of their energy from carbs, would live 1.1 years less than the moderate group. 

It's time to bin the Atkins book – the study also showed that plant-based protein and fat is a healthier swap for carbs, than animal-based products.

Their findings discovered that the risk of death increased when carbs were exchanged for "animal-derived fat or protein" and the risk decreased when it was substituted with plant-based foods. 

Leading the research, Dr Sara Seidelmann, clinical and research fellow in cardiovascular medicine from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, told the BBC:

"Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight-loss strategy.

"However, our data suggests that animal-based low carbohydrate diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall life span and should be discouraged.

"Instead, if one chooses to follow a low carbohydrate diet, then exchanging carbohydrates for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy ageing in the long term."

If this research is anything to go by, carbs are your friend and not your enemy.

Moderation and balance diets seem to always rule out.

However, if you are changing up your diet – make sure you talk to your doctor before you do.

Now I'm off to indulge in some pasta!

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