HomeTagsPosts tagged with "sexual violence"

sexual violence

by

Gardaí are currently investigating an incident at the 3Arena during a Shawn Mendes concert involving a teenage girl.

Allegedly, the young woman was 'sexually assaulted' in the bathroom at the Canadian pop singer's sold-out gig in Dublin.

The teenager took to social media to write about her experience, and confirmed that she had explained the situation to the Gardaí.

She wrote: "On Saturday 13th of April I attended a Shawn Mendes concert in a well known Dublin venue near the docks."

"During a visit to the toilets I was sexually assaulted by an unknown person. The venue is aware of this and so are the guards." she continued.

"This is a warning to anybody attending any event from now on not to go to the toilet on your own," she said, shedding light on the lack of safety even at public events.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Shawn Mendes (@shawnmendes) on

"If this message and my experience can save one person from going through what I went through then my experience will not be totally negative."

A garda spokesman said: "Gardaí are investigating an alleged sexual assault of a female, that occurred at a venue on North Wall Quay, Dublin 1 on the April 13, 2019. Investigations are ongoing."

A spokesperson for the 3Arena has been contacted about the troubling allegation.

Feature image: Flickr/entertainment Dot IE

Trending

French police officials have arrested American rap singer Chris Brown following a rape accusation, AP has reported.

Closer initially reported that a 24-year-old woman alleged Brown raped her after meeting him in a nightclub on 15 January in France.

The same woman is also claiming that one of Brown's acquaintances abused her.

This isn't the first time the 29-year-old has been accused of sexual violence or violent crime.

The singer dated Rihanna back in 2009, and the pair were brought into the spotlight after an argument left the Umbrella singer covered in bruises and facial injuries as a result of Brown's rage.

Brown has spoken of the incident, claiming after he saw the image of her injured face that he, "felt like a f*cking monster".

Pitchfork also reported in 2017 that a woman claimed she was seriously sexually assaulted in the rapper's home, and sued him as a result of her trauma.

Trending

New guidelines of been released by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) to reflect the public audience's changing views on sexual content and violence.

Research shows that a surprising 95% of teenagers have been calling for stronger classification on media, with the youth especially worried about watching fictional scenarios which could realistically occur in their own lives.

The BBFC are implementing alterations which sees movies depicting rape and sexual violence as rated 15 rather than 12A.

Keira Knightley's famous period drama The Duchess, which was classified in the 12 category at the time of release, would now be considered as 15 under the new guidelines as a result of the rape scene.

In the study involving more than 10,000 people, 97% of parents as well as young people are asking for stricter guidelines for online content and tougher classification.

David Austin, BBFC chief executive, said: “Over the last five years the way we consume film and video has changed beyond all recognition. That’s why it’s so important that there is consistency between what people watch on and offline."

Austin continued; “The research shows that parents and teenagers want us to give them the information and guidance that they need to view what’s right for them."

“We are updating our standards around depictions of sexual violence and very strong sex references to reflect changes in public attitudes," he continued.

Since 2014, British views of sex have consistently transformed and progressed with the times. Audiences now want higher classifications for sexual content.

BBFC claim that “the language of pornography” and strong sexual references are also expected to gain an 18 certificate.

The BBFC maintain that audiences are more tolerant of violent content than other potentially troubling material, according to their research, which is worrying.

Austin added: “We’re here to listen to what people want, which is why they trust our age ratings. So it’s encouraging to know that we’ve been classifying content in line with what people want and expect when it comes to difficult themes around credible real-life scenarios."

“We also know that people are more comfortable with issues such as action violence," he concluded. The guidelines will be officially released on February 28.

Trending

Gardaí are now investigating an alleged sexual assault which took place last Thursday in South Dublin.

The incident involving the teenager apparently occurred on Lower Kilmacud Road in Stillorgan on January 10, around 7pm.

The young woman was walking down the road towards Dundrum and noticed a man following her, according to a Garda source.

Image: kfmradio.com

The man in question is accused of ejaculating on the woman before walking away, after following her for about two kilometres before the attack.

The teenager’s clothes have been taken by the Gardaí to be tested for DNA evidence. A significant amount of CCTV evidence has also been recovered.

A spokeswoman for the Gardaí confirmed officers were investigating “an alleged sexual assault on a female on Lower Kilmacud Road, Dublin on 10th January 2019 at 7pm”.

Gardai are following a definite line of inquiry. 

Trending

A survey carried out by Newstalk has released results stating that half of Irish people would not report rape to the Gardaí if they knew it happened to someone else.

Newstalk’s Women in Ireland Survey shows that while eight out of ten people would report a rape if it was committed against them, when it came to somebody else the reports shifted entirely.

Red C conducted the survey for Newstalk in order to examine sexual violence in the country, and it found that women were significantly less likely to report an incident of rape of someone other than themselves. 

Only four out of ten women said they would report an incident, and six out of ten men, meaning that women are more likely to remain quiet about sexual violence occurring to a friend, acquaintance, family member, or even a stranger.

The survey also found that twice as many women as men have experienced gender discrimination, and three quarters of people would report sexual harassment at work.

The Women in Ireland survey enquired about if participants would report other sexual assault incidences such as groping, indecent exposure, sexual harassment at work or non-consensual touching.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Rape Crisis (@dublinrapecrisis) on

Apparently, three quarters of people would report indecent exposure or sexual harassment while at work, and two thirds of people would give a statement regarding groping to An Garda Síochána.

Regarding discrimination, twice as many women as men said they have experienced prejudicial treatment with younger people.

Interestingly, people who are living in Dublin are evidently more likely to have experienced gender discrimination in their lives.

Overall, the report shows troubling responses from our country, which has had two major rape trial controversies in the last year alone which have shed light on the worrying ways in which our justice system treats sexual assault victims.

Trending

by

"The last thing I want is a girl crying leaving my house."- Paddy Jackson

The Belfast Rape Trial led to shockingly large media coverage, emotional social media comment and outraged street protest.

The nine-week trial ended in late March 2018, when the jury of nine men and three women unanimously served not guilty verdicts on all charges to all four men involved.

Ex-Ulster and Ireland rugby players Stuart Olding and Paddy Jackson were found not guilt of rape and sexual assault at a house party in June 2016, leading to an onslaught of widespread criticism of how trials such as these are conducted.

Defendants Blane McIlroy and Rory Harrison were also found not guilty on all charges, with Irish rugby captain Rory Best facing critique for attending the trial itself. The hashtag #notmycaptain trended on Irish Twitter.

Two leading barristers in the case feature in the documentary, Toby Hedworth QC for the Prosecution and Brendan Kelly QC for Paddy Jackson.

Image: Belfast Live

The trial ended on March 28, but has remained in the headlines all-year-round, specifically regarding the #MeToo movement, as well as the recent rape trial in Cork.

Both trials have generated upsetting levels of scandal due to the introduction of female underwear as evidence. The Belfast trial saw the young woman's bloodied thong passed around the courtroom with 100 members of the public.

Las week, #ThisIsNotConsent went viral after the news hit regarding a rape trial in court where her underwear was used as evidence of her apparent consent.

Ruth Coppinger TD produced a thong in the middle of a Dáil debate to make a point about the treatment of witnesses in rape trials.

The Gillen Review Panel in Northern Ireland was published this week, and recommended numerous changes around serious sexual assault trials. 

In the documentary, RTÉ One also spoke to members of the public who attended the Belfast rape trial. 

Fair warning, Documentary On One: Notes From A Belfast Rape Trial is a very difficult listen. Narrated by Emer Horgan and Ronan Kelly, the listener of the documentary is faced with some quite graphic testimony.

That jury decided that they could not say, beyond reasonable doubt, that rape had taken place in Paddy Jackson’s house on that June night in 2016. 

Anyone who feels affected by any issues contained within this documentary, please visit the RTÉ Support page for Helpline information

The first broadcast will be tomorrow, Saturday November 24  2018, on RTÉ Radio 1 at 2pm.

Feature image: JOE.co.uk

Trending

by

Emotional tributes and forms of creative protest have been occurring worldwide for the 17-year-old woman involved in this week's Cork rape trial, which saw a female barrister use the young woman's underwear as evidence against her.

According to the barrister, the woman's lace thong proved that she was 'open to meeting someone and being with someone', leading to the organisation of mass rallies in support of the victim.

The 27-year-old man accused of raping her in an alleyway was acquitted of rape following barrister's Elizabeth O'Connell's finishing statements.

Among the tributes to the young woman is a hauntingly beautiful rendition of a song, penned by a young woman of similar age to the girl involved:

The video, which was shared on Twitter by her brother John Gaughan, has been steadily gaining in views since it was uploaded.

The lyrics echo the sentiments of outraged women all over the country, who are refusing to accept that underwear can play a part in consent and can also be used as evidence in a court of law.

"What are you wearing underneath? Isn't for you to see unless I want that to be, is that clear?"

"No please, can you stop? That should be enough for you to f*cking wise up, is that clear?"

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Peppermint (@i_am_peppermint) on

"Consent is what we're told, at 17-years-old, is what we wear underneath our clothes. Victims become accused of the crime they didn't do, responsibility is abused."

"We shouldn't have to fear for this to happen to us or someone that we love, is that clear?"

"Something has to change with the mindset of today, it's still not clear."

Anger has spread around Ireland as well as in other countries around the world as a result of the latest controversial rape trial.

ROSA and Ruth Coppinger TD have both requested that strikes occur as a form of protest against the handling of sexual violence cases as well as consent and Irish sex education on International Women's Day.

A review of the handling of sexual assault cases in Northern Ireland been released today, stating that members of the public be excluded from such trials following the high profile Belfast case.

The report, written by retired judge John Gillen and states that access to trials involving serious sexual offences should be confined to close family members of the complainant, the defendant as well the media. 

In the Republic of Ireland system, rape trials are already closed to the public. 

It remains to be seen if any positive consequences will occur as a result of the protests, we hope improvements can be made for the sake of sexual assault and rape victims in Ireland.

Feature image: ABC News

Trending

by

The Bernard Shaw is a well-known site for political activism: murals dedicated to Savita Halappanavar, the Repeal Movement and the homelessness crisis have appeared in recent times alone.

This week saw a spark of anger which turned into a flame following a controversial Cork rape trial in which a female barrister named Elizabeth O'Connell used a 17-year-old woman's underwear as evidence against her.

As a result, #thisisnotconsent protests took place all over the country, with women and men marching with 'I Believe Her' banners in the air.

The Bernard Shaw's latest activist art piece is dedicated to the young woman whose 27-year-old alleged attacker was acquitted of rape following Elizabeth O'Connell's finishing statement.

The barrister urged the jury of eight men and four women to consider the woman's underwear, which happened to be a lace thong, claiming that the woman "was attracted to the defendant and was open to meeting someone and being with someone".

The Richmond Street South mural shows painted images of various shapes and sizes of underwear, with each branded with the words 'Not Asking For It.' The work was created by Emma Blake, a street artist and graphic designer, also known as Estr.

The mural's appearance is in support of the solidarity rallies which took place this week, urging the government to change the way in which rape trials are conducted.

Women's rights group ROSA wrote that the judicial consideration of the girl's underwear  as evidence was a "disgrace".

ROSA also stated: "These lines of character accusation and victim blaming are unfortunately a common tactic used in cases before the courts relating to sexual violence."

"The judiciary has proven itself time and time again to be utterly damaging to survivors of sexual violence to seek justice."

 Let's hope these crucial protests lead to the necessary changes to Irish law regarding sexual violence.

Feature image: Channel NewsAsia

Trending

100 Women I Know is movement which began with a questionnaire which asked women to share any experiences of rape and sexual assault.

92 out of the 100 Women asked in a survey said they had been pressured or forced into sexual activity.

The shocking results were hugely emotional, blunt and upsetting.

They also detail the harsh realities which women face every single day, yet sexual violence is so prevalent that women have been effectively silenced on the issue until recent times.

These experiences which were generously and bravely shared led Phoebe Montague, founder of the project, to direct and produce an award-winning short documentary film which focused on four intimate interviews.

Break the Habit Press decided to publish the book, and a movement to strengthen solidarity between survivors of assault was born.

It is imperative that sexual violence is addressed as a social issue, one which needs to be stopped at all costs.

Jazmin, one of the women featured in the documentary, has decided to collaborate with Phoebe in launching their sister organisation People We Know.

The organisation aims to provide an educational programme which attempts to prevent young people from becoming victims or perpetrators of sexual violence.

By planning much needed workshops for schools and communities, these transformative activities are designed to educate and engage young people on the difficult topic.

The participants will hopefully feel encouraged to reconsider their preconceived notions, judgments and misconceptions surrounding consensual sex, healthy relationships and sexual violence.

Young people are the future and it is our responsibility, as a society, to empower them with tools for change.

100 Women I Know on Instagram shared a disturbing statistic on World Suicide prevention day: 1 in 10 victims attempted suicide as a result of sexual violence.

The Instagram page also wrote a statement paralleling the image, detailing how sexual violence and suicide go hand in hand far more often than previously thought.

“63% of victims suffered mental or emotional problems as a result of sexual violence. 53% reported having problems trusting people or having difficulty in other relationships. 1 in 10 victims attempted suicide as a result.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A study by the Office for National Statistics found that 63% of sexual violence victims suffered mental or emotional problems. 53% reported having problems trusting people or having difficulty in other relationships. 1 in 10 victims attempted suicide as a result. – Yesterday was World Suicide Prevention day, yet suicide affects people’s lives every day, globally. – Sexual violence is just one of the many reasons people attempt or die by suicide. Deciding to take ones life is never an easy option, let this day be a reminder to us all to live our lives with compassion. – Male suicide is the biggest killer of men under 45 in the UK. We have a massive issue surrounding lack of communication and emotional connection worldwide. Check in with your loved ones; the “weak” and the “strong”, be kind to strangers; you never know what battles someone is fighting. – Reaching out to ask for help is never easy, if you don’t have anyone to speak to directly, there are services available to help. Don’t feel ashamed by your circumstances or embarrassed at your inability to cope, you are certainly not alone. – Please call 116 112 now for UK Samaritans. @samaritanscharity – – – – #MentalHealth #worldsuicidepreventionday #SuicideAwareness #SexualViolence #Abuse #Survivors #StrongerTogether #ReachingOut #Compassion #Love #PeopleWeKnow #100WomenIKnow #MoreThan100Womem

A post shared by This Is A Movement (@100womeniknow) on

One thing is certain: Changes in our society must be made if we ever want women to feel safe, and their voices need to be heard.

The book can be bought online here, with 30% of proceeds going directly towards funding more educational workshops in schools.

Check out their website for more information here.

"Fight the fear if you believe in your art": Phoebe Montague, 100 Women I Know.

Feature image: Source/ https://www.100womeniknow.com/film

Trending

by

Cork's Sexual Violence Centre received a total of 1,436 calls last year, according to its annual report.

Figures published today also showed that the organisation received just over 1,000 texts through its messaging service.

Almost half of the adult victims of rape and sexual assault in Cork in 2016 were aged between 18 and 23 and 91 per cent of the people who contacted the centre were female.

What's more, the report also found that just over one third of the people who used the services last year were students.

According to the figures, one in four assaults took place in the victim's home, 23 per cent happened outdoors and 22 per cent in the offenders home.

Shockingly, less than half of their clients reported their rape/ sexual assault to the authorities.

The centre provides a number of free services to the victims of sexual violence including, short-term counselling, court accompaniment and preparation of victim impact reports.

A total of 1633 counselling sessions were offered in 2016.

Speaking about the figures, Sexual Violence Centre Cork director, Mary Crill said: “One in five women in Ireland experience sexual violence. We have a conviction rate of 5%. Only one in four victims report to the gardaí. Sexual violence is about power and control. It is about misogyny.”

“Recent times have seen conversations and campaigns about consent. Consent is not grey. There is consensual sex and there is sexual assault. There is nothing in-between.”

She also spoke of the need for more education around the subject of consent in third level education.

“My hope for the conversations around consent and the consent workshops in third level institutions is that victims of sexual violence, their families, their friends and peers will acknowledge sexual violence – victims will be believed, victim blaming and rape culture will enter into decline.”

She welcomed the establishment of the Garda Protective Services Unit in Cork, and progression of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Bill through the Dáil and the Seanad, however, she also said funding remains an on-going problem.

The centre can be contacted on 1800 496 496. For more information please visit www.sexualviolence.ie

Trending