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inequality

This may just boil your blood to dangerous levels. Many of us are well-used to cleaning up after ourselves, as well as the men around us.

New research has found that women who share a home with a male partner undertake the 'majority' of the household chores, which is unsurprising to most.

Researchers at University College London and Imperial College London have found that women still do most of the household duties when they live with a man, specifically 16 hours per week on tasks compared to the mere six that men carry out.

The Independent reported on the data, which was taken on 8513 heterosexual couples who lived together between the ages of 16 and 25 from 2010 until 2012 in the UK.

The findings of the UK Household Longitudinal Study can't be applied to queer couples or couples who don't live together.

The study was published in the journal Work, Employment and Society, and focused on a series of weekly work variables; hours spent at a paid job, hours spent caring for a child or adult and hours spent on chores.

The education of the participants and their attitudes towards gender roles were also examined.

The couples were divided into eight groups, based on the balance of paid and domestic work each partner carried out.

A range of people were included with different backgrounds such as low caregiving responsibilities, men who are the primary earner, women who are the breadwinners, women who do most of the household work, dual earners who shared caregiving responsibilities, women who work part-time and do domestic work, couples with men who work long hours, and unemployed couples with low caregiving responsibilities. 

It was found that women completed the majority of the domestic tasks in a shocking 93 percent of the couples surveyed.

When both partners worked full-time, women were FIVE TIMES more likely to spend 20 hours or more a week on chores.

50 percent of the couples examined had a "relatively egalitarian division of work," according to the authors of the study.

However, only two groups (seven percent of the couples) were seen to be the most egalitarian: a female earner who shared domestic work and couples in which men spent long hours on chores.

"The female-earner was the only group in which men’s contribution to the housework was similar to that of their partners, and this group had the highest proportion of women with educational qualifications higher than those of their partners," the study reads.

The authors concluded that in the UK, "gender equality in divisions of work is rare and gender norms remain strong."

Both partners need to share feminist ideals when it comes to household work being divided fairly, but a baby constantly thrust couples back into their old roles.

"The largest egalitarian groups in this study were less likely to have children," according to the data.

Gender disparities clearly still exist when it comes to care-giving and household duties, with domestic employment still mainly women in the workforce.

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As women, we would love to believe that we live in an equal world with our male counterparts.

However, we know the reality of that is far from our hopes and we often encounter inequalities in all areas of our day to day activities.

Little Mix are all too familiar with this as women in the music industry and they're determined to stand up against it – Yass, gals. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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In a recent interview, the band, who are comprised of Jade Thirlwall, Perrie Edwards, Leigh-Anne Pinnock and Jesy Nelson, claimed that when women want to take control of their careers, they are given different treatment to men.

"It’s double standards when you’re young women. When we started out it was almost like, ‘This is your lane, stay in your lane. You’re the faces and the name’. We’re not. We’re the brand," Perrie told The Sun.

“We’re businesswomen. It’s our baby. So everything we do creatively comes from us. It is frustrating that if a group of guys were to say, ‘We’re not going to do that song, we’re going to release this song’, it’s like, ‘Maybe we should listen’.

"Whereas when we do it, it’s like, ‘Oh they’re at it again, they’re whining…But we’re not. We’re perfectionists. We take everything we do so seriously. It’s important to us,” she added.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The group clearly know their market as they've dominated the charts with their smash hits since their X-factor fame in 2011. 

Little Mix have just released their fifth studio album, LM5, but the new music is no longer under the management of Simon Cowell.

Earlier this month, Simon announced the band's split from his record label.

The music mogul insisted that the end of their working relationship came with no bad blood, saying: "They are the hardest working bunch of girls I’ve ever worked with. They deserve everything they’ve got”.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Little Mix commented on their new music saying it was the album they've "always wanted to make."

We can't wait to play them on repeat, and fair play to the women, may they continue their battle with of getting the recognition and treatment they deserve – regardless of their gender.

Every voice in the fight for equality is vital and we still have a long way to go before we are treated on the same par with men professionally. 

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The top ten most dangerous countries for women in the world has been released, and we're not surprised. 

According to a survey commissioned by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, India is currently the worst place in the world for women, followed by war-torn countries Afghanistan and Syria. 

The United States also makes the list in tenth place. 

The poll was conducted around was conducted experts from Europe, Africa, the Americas, South East Asia, South Asia and the Pacific between March and May of this year. Respondents included aid professionals, academics, healthcare staff, non-government organisation workers, policy-makers, development specialists and social commentators.

The inclusion of the US on the list came as a surprise to some in the wake of the Me Too and Time's Up movements. 

"People want to think income means you're protected from misogyny, and sadly that's not the case," said Cindy Southworth, executive vice president of the Washington-based National Network to End Domestic Violence.

"We are going to look back and see this as a very powerful tipping point … We're blowing the lid off and saying '#Metoo and Time's Up'."

India ranked in first place due to the risks that women face from cultural and traditional practices, such as acid attacks, female genital mutilation, physical abuse and child marriage. However, this only seems to be worsening as the rate of reported crimes against women rose by 83 per cent between 2007 and 2016, with a sickening four cases of rape reported every hour.

India has made international headlines this year with a number of high-profile sexual assault cases. Earlier this year, eight men were accused of the gang rape of an eight-year-old girl and in April, a seven-year-old girl was raped and murdered during a wedding.

Protests saw thousands take to the streets in wake of the death of a 16-year-old girl, who was raped and burnt alive in her home. 

"India has shown utter disregard and disrespect for women … rape, marital rapes, sexual assault and harassment, female infanticide has gone unabated," Manjunath Gangadhara, an official at the Karnataka state government told Reuters.

"The (world's) fastest growing economy and leader in space and technology is shamed for violence committed against women."

India was also ranked the most dangerous country for women for human trafficking, including sex slavery and domestic servitude, as well as for traditional practices such as forced marriage, stoning and female infanticide.

The list also included Somalia, Saudi Arabia,  Pakistan, The Democratic Republic of Congo, Yemen and Nigeria. 

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