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One of the biggest thrift store events of 2019 is happening on Monday, and you don't want to miss the chance to walk in like Macklemore circa 2012 in faux fur.

Charity shops, flea markets and ethical fashion brands are all the rage right now, with the environment being in an absolute STATE.

The textiles industry is the second biggest polluter of water in the world, and every new piece of clothing that you buy is contributing to the pile of materials in landfill, toxic dye chemicals in the rivers of underdeveloped countries and the workplace abuse of the women who create the garments.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Dublin vintage shop trailblazers Nine Crows are hosting their debut 'Monday Flea Market' next week, promising pre-loved clothing and accessories abundant.

The event will host 20 amazing independent sellers, including Molly Parsons (Depop legend and 'Molly's Minutes' podcast gal) and RTE 2FM DJ Tara Stewart, who's style is beyond amazing.

It's taking place at the Nine Crows warehouse/thrift store at 12 Pembroke Row, off Baggot Street, from 4pm until 8pm.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@ninecrows) on

It's a cash-only event so scout out the numerous ATMs before hitting up the thrift shop. Bring your own tote or carrier bag also, as they won't be offering any pesky plastic bags.

Don't miss the first ever 'Monday Flea Market', it's set to be a brilliant initiative. Their debut session will be busy as hell so get down on time to nab the best goodies.

Feature image: Instagram/@ninecrows

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Eyal Booker was catapulted into fame last year after taking part in the phenomenon that is Love Island, the ITV2 reality show that's become beloved all over the world.

The 23-year-old appeared on Celebs Go Dating after his stint in the Spanish villa, and definitely knows his stuff when it comes to reality TV romance. 

We caught up with the model and TV star at the launch of a massively-exciting essence lip collection. Their Lip Saviours range features 52 fabulous products including lipsticks, lipglosses, lipliners and liquid lipsticks.

Eyal Booker at the essence Lip Saviours launch in Dublin

Oh, did we mention that they're all under €4? essence have also created the ultimate lip look book to offer you dozens of options to create your signature look.

essence also prides itself on it's cruelty-free status, so you can mix and match to find your glamorous, natural, vibrant, glossy, understated or matte lip looks without worrying about animal testing.

Eyal Booker is representing the ground-breaking beauty brand, which sponsors both Love Island on Virgin Media player as well as the biggest pageant in the country; Miss Ireland 2019.

Of course, we simply had to ask him his opinions on our Irish exports, namely Longford lass Maura Higgins.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@maurahiggins) on

Luckily for us, he's a big fan;

“I love the Irish contestants, I love Maura. I just loved her from the start. I think that the way she’s entered the villa, the way that she’s held herself, the things she comes out with; I think she’s a powerful, independent woman who’s proud of who she is and stands up for what she believes in and says what she wants. I think that that’s really inspiring for young women out there, and she’s a good influence and good person to have within the public eye and society”.

“She’s going to have a good career. At first, it took a little time to get used to her but now we can’t get enough of her. She’s contagious and just says it how it is. That goes a long way in this show.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@maurahiggins) on

The latest controversy to shake the villa is, of course, the meltdown between Anna Vakili and Jordan Hames.

The model asked Anna to be his girlfriend only days ago, yet pulled India Reynolds aside for a chat (on Curtis' advice) to confess his feelings for her, while Anna was only metres away.

What does Eyal think was going through his head? The pair were dumped from the villa last night, but were they authentic?

“I don’t know where that’s come from (Jordan’s feelings for India), I don’t know what Jordan was thinking. They’ve screwed each other over within the process, you know when Anna left him for Ovie and then came back to him and now Jordan’s about to do the same. As much as they’re trying to make us believe their relationship, I don’t buy the reasons that they’re in the villa. I just think they want to be genuine but they’re actually just not that into each other.”

ITV bosses have faced numerous accusations that the reality show is a 'fix', with claims made against the honesty of each character.

In Eyal's time in the villa, he denies that the show every forced anyone into a certain narrative of hero or villain, womaniser or gentleman;

“They don’t try and create something that’s not there. They highlight some things over others, in terms of the edit. I wasn’t just this spiritual, tree-hugging guy but that’s a lot of what I was made out to be. You can’t all be the same, and they edit everyone a different way. There’s no one there saying ‘You should do this’ or ‘You should do that’.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@eyalbooker) on

Other criticisms made against the show involve the noteworthy emphasis on physique and appearance. Does Eyal think the show has contributed to the continued popularity of beauty pageants like Miss Ireland?

“Pageants have always been popular and I think with social media and the world that we live in, they can grow even quicker and bigger because there’s accessibility to a wider audience. I think Love Island showcases the fact that it can reach such a vast and big audience. It encourages other people to get on social media and get on platforms and use that platform in order to further themselves."

Amy Hart recently posted an Instagram snap of a charity who she works with closely, but trolls commented that the image was 'boring'. Social media presence is a huge part of Love Island stars' careers when many of them leave, but do they control who they work with and their brand?

According to Eyal; “We have complete control. When I came out of the villa, I got a management because I needed to manage everything that was going on. They try and guide you in a direction that they see fit for you but also a direction that you see fit for yourself. It’s just a discussion that you have. We have incredible platforms when we come out, and I think charity is a big thing on people’s minds and people want to use their platform for good as well. It’s something that a lot of people go into and become ambassadors for because, as much as you’re reaping the rewards of having such a huge platform and getting all of these brand deals, you also want to give back to people in less fortunate positions."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@eyalbooker) on

He continued; "Charity is a nice thing to do, I’ve always worked with them but now I’m doing on them on a bigger scale because I’ve got a bigger audience.”

“I work with World Vision, very closely. I’m an ambassador for them, and I also work with the RSPCA and Dog’s Trust. I’ve always loved animals, all animals, and animal welfare. World Vision is to do with young children and their families in areas of conflict or disaster, and it’s about sending emergency response and helping them further themselves. Children are the future, they’re the generation who are going to shape our world and who are going to be here when we’re not. Providing them with the best possible tools in order to have the best and brightest future is essential for our world to get better and better.”

Another problematic aspect of the show, arguably, is their continuous sponsorship from fast fashion brands. The stars wear different ensembles every day in the villa, with companies like I Saw It First working with the reality show.

Once the Islanders leave the villa, many of them will work with branding constantly, showing a materialistic lifestyle via their social platforms. Does Eyal see an issue with this side of Love Island life?

“It’s an interesting one, I actually hadn’t heard that until now. I think there’s two sides to this story. I think that everyone’s individual style and fashion showcases the fact that you can self-express and be who you want to be, and dress and wear what you want to wear. I think fast fashion is affordable for people, but at the same time, fast fashion is one of the biggest polluters of our environment. It contributes to huge amount of emissions and pollution and adds to climate change."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@isawitfirst) on

He continues; "It’s one of those things where we want instant gratification and we want to be able to purchase all the things that we want for a low price but we don’t really see at which cost we’re getting them at and how detrimental it is to our environment. I’m in a Catch 22 about that one, I work with some fast fashion brands and I would like to think I’m an environmentalist and I care about our planet. I think there’s a balance that we can find within it. Although fast fashion, although it’s been around for a while, it has only just come into play and become as popular as it is. It’s about us starting to regulate that and coming on board with how we as a society consume things and over-consume things.”

Does he do his homework on the brands that he associates with, when it comes to ethics?

essence is cruelty-free which is part of the reason I’m at this event. I couldn’t be an ambassador for, let’s say the RSPCA who campaign against animal testing, and then a brand who test on animals. We’re only human and we make mistakes, we overlook things, but we try as hard as we can to highlight the things that align with me and then we go from there.”

The show is undeniably heteronormative, and excludes the majority of the population.

With Love Island spreading Stateside and now to South Africa for the winter edition, does he think these expansion moves could mean an LGBTQ+ version could be in the pipeline soon?

“I think it would take some time for people to catch on to. I’ve grown up within an entertainment, performing world, I don’t differentiate between anyone; your sex, the colour of your skin, your appearance; whatever you are, you are. But I think we, as a society, whether we like it or not are still evolving and still changing and becoming aware of the LGBTQ+ community. I think as much as I’d like to say that there’d be no stigmas attached and no judgements, if we see what judgements come from Love Island and how much stick people can get as heterosexuals, then we have to be realistic at what the response would be. I think that that’s the way it’s going to go, and eventually there will be all kinds of shows for all kinds of people, but we have to ease it in slowly.”

Feature image: Instagram/@eyalbooker

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Sustainable fashion is on the rise, and with it comes the excitement of buying pre-loved vintage items and designer goods for a fraction of their original price. 

If you're like us, and are gagging to update your wardrobe with high-quality, classic designer pieces for good value for money, we have the exact store for you.

With the fashion industry being the world’s second-largest polluter, just after oil, our shopping habits desperately need to change. Fashion has impact, that's for sure. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@sustainablefashiondublin) on

The Wardrobe Kilkenny is a designer consignment store which stocks everything from designer bags and accessories to complete outfits from high-end labels for an affordable price.

Their business has been promoting sustainable fashion for over 20 years, and they're diligent when it comes to environmental impact. Getting dressed every morning has direct results.

Shockingly, more than 80 billion pieces of clothing are produced worldwide each year. Of these pieces, 75 percent will end up in landfills. The average T-shirt uses 1500 to 2000 litres of water to make.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@sustainablefashiondublin) on

The fashion industry uses 1600 chemicals in their dyeing processes, and only one per cent of these have been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Scary stats, right?

Shopping pre-loved needs to be a life choice, not just a trend. Buying clothes doesn't have to mean compromising on fashion, style or quality, according to Yvonne Fitzgerald.

Yvonne acts as the proprietor of The Wardrobe Kilkenny, and believes that shopping consignment has numerous incredible benefits. For one, it's eco-friendly. You're keeping garments out of landfill.

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

Another perk is that you can find unique items with a treasure hunt-type shopping experience. The thrill of the hunt is undeniable.

The same brands come at a lower price, it's like a permanent sale.

The Wardrobe Kilkenny stock pre-loved labels such as Chanel, Prada, Gucci, Brunello Cuccinelli, Bulgari, Dolce and Gabbana, Pucci, Alexander McQueen, Diane Von Furstenberg, Louis Vuitton and many more.  

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

Even if you don't head down to buy something, you can sell your own designer goods for a pretty penny.

Companies like Depop are essentially doing the same thing, whereby you can run your own online shop and buy and sell items over the brilliant app.

When you have gently-used, unique or highly-coveted items that you don't use, why not sell them? Give someone else the chance to love your belongings.

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

The Wardrobe Kilkenny believe in the lifecycle of luxury goods and are always looking for designer items to sell on your behalf.

To get in touch call 056 771 5542 or visit the store at 29 Patrick Street.

Between now and August 31, if you mention SHEmazing when you consign your piece you can receive 15 percent off your first purchase. The bargains simply go on and on. Enjoy the couture, ladies.

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Just over one month ago, veteran vintage brand Nine Crows launched their very own Thrift Store after the success of their pop-ups, and it's a beautiful sight to behold.

Pre-loved threads, charity shopping and vintage looks have all become the pinnacle of fashion ever since awareness has spread about the textile industry's shocking lack of sustainability.

With fast fashion as big an issue as ever, and tonnes of clothes constantly being sent to landfill, brands like Nine Crows are incredibly important.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@ninecrowsthriftshop) on

Nine Crows held warehouse clearance sales throughout the summer, finally opening up the brilliant thrift store on June 8 of this year.

They're a small, independently-owned company who contribute to a sustainable lifestyle, and they're proud of it. Making ethical fashion more accessible and sustainable is their goal, and we love them for it.

Their Nine Crows vintage store is home to special, high-quality and one-of-a-kind pieces, which their buying team sort through tens of thousands of items to find. Locating gems ain't an easy job.

The prices are significantly higher in their vintage store, as the clothing is curated and features rare pieces, but their thrift store is a whole different story.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ninecrowsthriftshop) on

For their thrift store, Nine Crows choose the type of clothing they want and purchase it in bulk. Second-hand clothes bought in this manner isn't curated, and you as the customer gets to do all the fun rummaging (fummaging?).

It's a mystery, but you find some amazing hidden pieces and reap the rewards with the cheap prices. The Nine Crows Thrift Store is located in their warehouse, off Baggot Street at 12 Pembroke Row.

The shop is open Thursdays to Sundays, from 12pm to 6pm and is WELL worth a sneaky peek. Everything is between €5 and €15, so you can't use prices as an excuse to shop fast fashion brands.

We're sprinting there as we type:

the goldbergs television GIF

Nine Crows currently have a competition running which gives you the chance to win a €100 gift voucher for their thrift store, so enter on their Instagram page here.

Feature image: Instagram/@ninecrowsthriftshop

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The world of fashion is changing. With the textiles industry named as the second-largest polluter of water (only behind the oil industry), times are progressing when it comes to ethical, eco-friendly clothing.

The new ASOS 'Responsible Edit' function aims to offer a simplistic way to find the most sustainable clothing options on the retailer's website.

From outfits made out of recycled materials and sustainable separates to ethical skincare and cosmetic products; the 'Responsible Edit' is the place to be.

1. Weekday wide leg smock jumpsuit in graphic print at ASOS

Weekday at ASOS
Price: €49.77

2. ASOS DESIGN sweetheart neck tiered midi dress in polka dot

ASOS Design
Price: €52.54

3. Monki v-neck midi dress with button details and polka dot print at ASOS

Monki at ASOS
Price: €55.30

4. Anaya With Love tulle ruffle shoulder bardot maxi dress with satin trim in soft pink at ASOS

Anaya With Love at ASOS
Price: €103.69

5. ASOS DESIGN square neck linen midi sundress with wooden buckle & contrast stitch in squiggle print

ASOS Design
Price: €38.71

6. ASOS DESIGN boiler playsuit with neon stitching

ASOS Design
Price: €62.21

7. Weekday fruit print mid cami dress with front slit in navy at ASOS

Weekday at ASOS
Price: €55.30

8. ASOS DESIGN denim sleeveless fitted mini stretch shirt dress

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

9. ASOS DESIGN recycled V neck strappy plunge swimsuit in washed paisley print

ASOS Design
Price: €28.34

10. ASOS DESIGN bandeau button front jumpsuit with pockets in tropical print

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

11. ASOS DESIGN tea jumpsuit with puff sleeve and tie detail

ASOS Design
Price: €38.71

12. ASOS DESIGN cami jumpsuit with gathered bodice detail in polka dot print

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

13. ASOS DESIGN halter neck button through mini sundress in ditsy floral print

ASOS Design
Price: €34.56

14. Monki floral print wide leg dungarees in black

Monki at ASOS
Price: €48.39

Happy (ethical, sustainable) shopping, ladies.

top gear hamster GIF

Feature image: ASOS

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Eco-friendly shopping carts can go farther than we can ever imagine, and now high street retailers and online stores are starting to realise that fact.

ASOS has launched an ethically-minded and sustainable edit of clothes on their website to give eco-conscious customers a wider range of choice while shopping.

Filling your wardrobe with sustainable clothes has never been easier, though fast fashion means that we need to cut down on shopping full stop and instead actually wear the clothes we currently own…

The fashion etailer's consumers can now browse collections from brands who use either recycled or sustainable materials.

New products will be added to the edit daily and will bring a wider range of filters over the next few months, according to Drapers.

The initiative means that shoppers can focus on environmental and ethical measures like animal welfare, waste reduction in the supply chain and locally made produce.

Online retailer Boohoo recently launched a recycled collection entitled For The Future this week, using 95 percent recycled material and made in the UK but many are arguing that these brands are making changes purely as PR stunts.

Changing filters and materials does make a valuable difference, even if the brands are still fuelling fast fashion and consumerism by mass producing items with huge amounts of water and a lack of labour laws.

In 2019 ASOS have been making a conscious effort to stock more eco-friendly pieces than ever, such as 100 percent organic cotton items, a parabens-free jumper or a handmade skirt. Sustainable dyes are also a plus.

Remember that it's always better to wear your own clothes as much as possible and give them some love, or else buy second-hand from vintage shops, charity stores or on Depop.

Producing a single t-shirt uses roughly 2,700 litres of water, and each year over 80 billion pieces of clothing are made across the globe. The textiles industry uses the second highest amount of water, only after the oil industry.

Check your carbon footprint out in the mirror as well as your outfit every morning, it's massively important in today's climate breakdown environment to look at our own actions and make small changes.

Check out our survival guide to shopping sustainably here.

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With all the conversations regarding the decrepit state of our planet, it's no surprise that the terms 'ethical fashion' and 'sustainable clothing' are coming up again and again.

Whether it's the depressing lack of labour rights which garment workers possess, or the untold amount of damage a simple white t-shirt can do to the earth; it's time to get serious about the disastrous environmental impact of fashion.

Fact Attack

1. The truth of the matter is: the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, second only to the oil industry.

Unfortunately, developing countries are constantly the ones to suffer from developed nations and their materialistic consumerist culture. While high street shops have lower pricing, it's important to ask ourselves why this is so.

Normally, it's because the cost of production is incredibly cheap, and the workers aren't being paid in equity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Patagonia Dublin (@patagoniadublin) on

For example, according to Stephen Leahy of The Guardian, 100 million people in India don't have access to drinking water. However, 85 percent of the daily needs of the entire population of India would be provided by the water used to grow the country's cotton.

The same cotton that goes into making our clothes, the clothes of people who have always had access to daily needs like drinking water. So the question is, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Fast fashion is a hugely feminist issue seeing as women in these underdeveloped countries are paid less than men for working in these garment factories.

The number of workplace injuries and deaths in factories in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and Cambodia are still shockingly high.

Now, this article isn't intended to guilt or shame anyone. It's just a wake-up call, and knowing the facts of this vital topic can lead to change. Change can lead to less harm on the planet, and isn't that always a good thing?

2. First of all, it's important to know that the untreated toxic waste-waters from textile factories are often dumped directly into the rivers of countries where clothes are made.

These waste-waters contain toxic substances like arsenic, mercury and lead, which kill the aquatic life and health of millions living by that same river. Contamination reaches the sea and spreads globally.

The use of fertilizers for cotton production heavily pollute waters, another danger of creating just a single item of clothing for brands we all know and buy from. 

Image: Catch News

3. Clothing in our culture has become disposable, and more and more textile waste is accumulating as a result. According to Elizabeth Cline of The Atlantic, a family in the 'western world' throws away an average of 30kg of clothing every year.

4. Only 15 percent of this is recycled or donated, and what happens to the rest? Landfill or incineration.

What's worse, synthetic fibres like polyester are plastic fibres, and can take up to 200 years to decompose.

Global textiles production emits 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases every single year. That's more than international flights and maritime shipping put together, according to Fashion Revolution.

5. These biodegradable synthetic fibres are used in a shocking 72 percent of our clothing. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

6. The UK population has £10.5 billion worth of unworn clothes in their closet, according to recent research. It's massively valuable to donate your unworn clothes rather than throw them away. Every item of apparel has a history, and can tell a story.

Fast fashion is having an unparalleled influence on the planet, with more and more clothes being incinerated into the air every year.

Workers are suffering in poverty to make our clothes, and we have no idea who they even are. We have a responsibility to bring ethics into what we wear and how we style ourselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ethical & Sustainable Fashion (@thekindguide) on

The issue may seem far away, but we can't ignore the problem any longer.

Clothing is a basic human need, give someone else the chance to wear the clothes you don't want anymore.

6. The apparel industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions, because our clothes are made in countries which power their factories with coal.

This means our synthetic fibres are basically made from fossil fuel, hence why it's so important to buy clothes with natural fibres.

Image: Remake

Here's our survival guide for ethical shopping and sustainable fashion, but remember: Nobody's perfect.

Even if you reduce your buying habits a tiny bit, or change one of your high street shops to an ethical brand, that's great. Just do your best; if everyone did a little, it would mean a lot.

Swap Shops

The Nu. Wardrobe is an Irish female-led startup company focusing on dramatically reducing fashion waste by encouraging the swapping or renting of clothes. Their tag-line is 'Look Good. Save Money. Reduce Waste.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@thenuwardrobe) on

Right on, gals. Extending the life cycle of clothes is hugely important in the fight against fast fashion.

Why not borrow an outfit from a friend or sibling instead of buying something entirely new when you probably don't need to?

Of course, it's important to treat yourself every now and again, and we all need new threads every once and a while when our body sizes change etc, but just remember to ask yourself every time: Do I really need this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

Charity shopping/Vintage outlets

Dun Laoghaire's main street contains some great charity shops like Bernardos, Oxfam, Age Action, Goodwill and more.

George's Street in the city centre also have a great selection of charity shops with the proceeds going to St. Vincent de Paul, Oxfam and Enable Ireland.

The array of vintage shops in Dublin is not to be understated. Head to Dublin Vintage Factory (there are two shops) in Temple Bar for the cheapest but best selection of vintage clothing.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Vintage Factory (@dublinvintagefactory) on

Vintage has emerged onto the scene even more in recent years, and has undoubtedly become one of the biggest trends in Dublin fashion.

Why not buy something no one else could possibly have? Pre-owned and pre-loved.

Other options include; Tola Vintage, Nine Crows, Lucy's Lounge, Monto, The Harlequin, Folkster, Tahiti Vintage, Om Diva, The Cat's Meow, Siopaella and Retro in George's Street Arcade and Temple Bar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tola Vintage Reworked (@tolavintagereworked) on

Apps: Depop/Good On You

Depop has become our addiction in recent months. The app is a clothes-selling platform, basically a digital swap shop, and the range of fashion styles involved is incredible.

Shipping from all over the world, the items are totally unique. You'll see some amazing style trends as well, and the app allows you to refine your searches for uber specific items and brands.

From vintage sportswear brands to quirky 1990s-era fashion pieces, don't miss out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Depop (@depop) on

It's a great feeling knowing that you aren't buying brand new clothes all the time, and the app allows you to make some $ cash dollah $ by selling all of the clothes you haven't worn since your teenage disco days.

We first heard about Good On You from none other than Emma Watson. If she models and endorses them, they have to be sheer excellence.

The app allows you to inform yourself all about the workers rights and sustainability of your favourite brands.

They offer great suggestions for ethical and sustainable brands too, and it's practical and easy to use.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Our favourite ethical/sustainable brands

Finding sustainable clothing for an affordable price can be challenging in Ireland, mainly because of shipping charges.

It's a huge comfort to know that you're paying for clothing made by people who have workers rights, and that they are high-quality. Here are some of our all-time fave brands:

Reformation

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reformation (@reformation) on

Weekday

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@weekdayofficial) on

People Tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@peopletreeuk) on

Oxfam

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Oxfam Ireland (@oxfamireland) on

Thought

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Thought (@thoughtclothing) on

Fame and Partners

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fame and Partners (@fameandpartners) on

Ilk + Ernie

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ilkandernie) on

Ninety Percent

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ninety Percent (@ninety_percent) on

Other gorgeous favourites include: Base Range, Etica, Everlane, Uniqlo, Exhibit, Komodo, Patagonia, Athleta, Petra Von Kant, Lara Intimates, Mayamiko, Thoreau, Boyish and ASOS Made in Kenya

Last but not least, we recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, it pulls back the curtain on fast fashion and the developing world. It's time to wear your values.

Feature image:  Instagram/@cheriebirkner/@sustainablefashionmatterz

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With the environmental crisis being one of the most pressing issues of modern living, small changes can have a big impact. 

One area which needs reform is the fashion industry – as we live in a culture which highlights the constant purchasing of plastic based and environmentally un-sound items.

However, times are a'changing, as more and more people become interested in alternative routes to serving a lewk. Charity and thrift shopping, re-sale apps like Depop and swap shopping are gaining popularity – and there is a swap shop kicking off in Dublin next weekend if you want to dip a toe into the world of sustainable shopping. 

Organised by Sustainable Fashion Dublin (@sustainablefashiondublin), the swap shop is the perfect way to update your wardrobe without harming the planet – and if it's an alien concept to you, here is how it all works. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by Sustainable Fashion Dublin (@sustainablefashiondublin) on

Co-founded by Geraldine Carton and Taz Kelleher, the Instagram page for SFD is creeping up on 8k followers, and is bringing together a community of young Irish people who are committed to being more mindful about their environmental impact. 

In their own words, Sustainable Fashion Dublin 'seeks to encouraging people to shop second-hand and discover sustainable fashion choices through fun, feel-good, environmentally-conscious events such as charity shop crawls, workshops, panel talks, and of course, swap shops.' 

In recent months, there has been a huge surge in the 'trend' of sustainability, with environmentally conscious influencers rising through the Instagram rankings to promote a sustainable lifestyle over a constant fast fashion culture – and swap shopping is a part of it. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Sustainable Fashion Dublin (@sustainablefashiondublin) on

The concept is simple: You bring items of clothing that you're willing to part with, and get to choose items brought by other attendees in return. 

The SFD Swap Shop allows you to bring up to 5 separate items – freshly washed and in good condition (and no forms of underwear). 

On arrival the pre-loved clothing will go through a quick quality control examination, before being hung up along the racks of other clothing brought by your fellow swap-shoppers. 

Once all the ticket holders have arrived and parted ways with their style swag, attendees line up, and after a 3-2-1 countdown, head into the racks to nab their first ultimate favourite item. Once everyone has one item they love, swap shoppers go back to the starting line and do the same again to grab their second most coveted piece. Repeat for a third time, and once everyone has three items, it's a free for all, with all attendees allowed to peruse the rails at their leisure. 

All ages, sizes and genders are welcome, and cold drinks and woodfire pizzas are on the menu. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Kicking off in Lucky's, Dublin, on May 18th, tickets fcr the event are just €15.00, so you can nab 3+ new fashion bits for scarcely the price of one new fast fashion piece.

You can find your tickets here, and following the swap shop, your ticket gives you entry to a gorge sustainable flea market after the festivities. 

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Sustainability has come to the forefront in recent months, as our generation becomes more and more concerned with the environmental impacts our actions are having. 

One area in particular which negatively impacts the world and accelerates climate change is the fast fashion industry. Luckily, people are wising up to the true cost of a cheap trend piece, with bloggers, celebrities and community leaders alike leading the charge to raise awareness about fast fashion – as well as brands listening to their shoppers and creating sustainable and recycled ranges.

This weekend, an event is kicking off in Dublin for those who want to learn more about minimising their fast fashion footprint and become immersed in the sustainable style community. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The first in a series of events dedicated to promoting sustainability in the cultural sector. 

The vent includes panel discussions on fashion sustainability, a market showcasing fashion finds, and a runway show full of Ireland's best and environmentally friendly brands and young designers. 

The event is being held as part of Fashion Revolution Week, with over twenty exhibitors taking part in the market and fashion show; each showcasing their sustainable, recycled, and upcycled designs.

Native Event’s Sustainable Fashion Show is being held tomorrow, Saturday, April 27th in the D-Light Studios, Dublin.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Panel discussions will be chaired by Swapsies founder Clodagh Kelly and Katie Harrington, who host the upcoming podcast Climate Queens.

Panel topics include “Is Green The New Black?” and “The Future Of Fashion: How Do We Successfully Transition To A Circular Economy?”.

Panellists on the evening are fashion and sustainability industry leaders such as Carrie Ann Moran of Fashion Revolution Ireland and the Rediscovery Centre, Siofra Caherty of Jump The Hedges, and Megan Best of Attention Attire and Body&Soul.

The event is the perfect excuse to get your gals together to learn more about making a positive change when it comes to fashion consumption. 

Many of us feel a pressure to have cyclic wardrobes, with items being disposed of regularly and replaces with new, affordable buys as new trends roll in. However, many affordable items are made of cheap, plastic-based fabrics which take hundreds of years to break down in landfills. The pressure to buy a new outfit for each social occasion on adds to this issue further. 

The panel discussions will shed light on these issues, while the fashion show and marketplace will showcase how diverse and stylish sustainable brands can be. 

Tickets are only €10,00, and you can nab them here before they sell out. 

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Una hasn't had an easy few weeks.

Her ex-husband Ben Foden admitting to his infidelity last week, but instead of dwelling on it, the former Saturdays singer stormed the runway at London Fashion Week and turned every head.

The 37-year-old appeared in Oxfam's Fashion Fighting Poverty Catwalk Show at Ambika 3 last night, showing off her fashionista roots.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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She captioned her Instagram post; 

"It was a real honour to walk the Oxfam #fashionfightingpoverty fashion show as part of London fashion week this evening", showing herself in a black svelte outfit with a plunging neckline. She's looking FIERCE.

The mum-of-two sported gorgeous black boots and loose black trousers, with her hair styled simply and tucked behind her ears. Very Parisian chic, we feel. 

She flashed a smile at the end of the catwalk, showing her excitement at representing the iconic charity in their fashion foray. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The glamorous Irish star could easily pursue a modelling career, she looks like she was born on the runway. We're glad she didn't let her ex-husband's confession dampen her moment.

In a recent interview, Ben admitted that he cheated on Una, but also claimed his infidelity wasn’t the only reason for the end of the relationship.

"At the moment anything that’s published about me is never very good and pretty rightly so because I was the one who committed adultery. But at the same time, it wasn’t the only reason for our divorce to go through."

"It’s not ideal, but we’re very amicable, we’re getting through it, we’re not the first people in the world to get divorced. We’ve got two little kids we adore," he concluded.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Una is since loved up with her new boyfriend, Tipperary hurler David Breen, and appears unfazed by her ex.

She's absolutely slaying the fashion runway anyway, and for an unreal cause. Herself and fellow singer Emeli Sande walked alongside supermodels as they took to the catwalk for Oxfam’s show to highlight sustainable fashion.

The musicians joined top models Stella Tennant and Laura Bailey at the Fashion Fighting Poverty event, showcasing Oxfam clothes specially picked by stylist Bay Garnett from the organisation’s online and high street shops.

Fair play, gals.

Feature image: Entertainment Daily

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Fast fashion brands have a bad name when it comes to sustainability. 

The fashion industry is one of the worst for our environment, as we move as a society that one wore and repaired a small number of clothes that made up an entire wardrobe, to one which expects a brand new outfit for every event. 

To counteract the negative environmental impacts that online retailer's increased output produces, some are stepping up to trailblaze a change – and Boohoo is leading the way. 

The online brand is taking a step towards sustainability with a new project – a range of t-shirts made of recycled materials.

The t-shirts come in classic, plain black and white, or with an environmentally friendly statement. 

The t -shirts are also made with a recyclable label and packaging, the first steps towards boohoo offering their customers more sustainable options.

'The boohoo Group acknowledges its responsibility to educate our consumer on fashion sustainability,' said  

'The recycled tees are just the first step to creating a sustainable offering to our consumer.' said boohoo CEO Carol Kane.

Made from 100% recycled materials, the t-shirts are a cotton/polyester mix created using salvaged waste  cuttings from organic cotton, which is then shredded and blended with recycled plastic bottles to create a soft  cotton yarn.

If you need up update your plain t-shirt staples, ensure that next time you do, you're minimising your environmental footprint. 

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By Kate Brayden 

Let’s all take a quick moment to look at what we are wearing. Check the label, and don’t just look at the brand. Really look, and see what country your clothing was made in, what material it is made of, and whether or not it gives details of the gives any detail at all about the people who it could be affecting.

It’s becoming more obvious by the day that women are pivotal in the climate change sustainability movement, and we have decided to find the ladies who are showing love to our planet through reusable clothing and ethical fashion.

Fast fashion (Zara, I love you but I’m side-eyeing you so hard right now) has proven itself to be a massive issue.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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 Oxfam has also released statistics that show that in four days, top fashion CEO’s earn a garment worker’s lifetime pay, and 80% of garment workers are women. New research shows that the world is consuming 80 billion pieces of clothing each year, an over 400% increase since 1998.

In terms of the working conditions of factory employees who create the garments which eventually sell mostly in Western countries, consumers fail to see the wastefulness of throwing out clothes constantly and buying brand new outfits, which are barely ever worn.

The value of knowing where your clothes are manufactured and that they are made in a safe environment by employers that pay fairly is not to be underestimated. Fast fashion is also unbelievably complicit in the duplicitous exploitation of women, another reason to educate yourself about the problem.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Do you want to play your part in ethical Irish fashion?

Have a look at these gals who do their part, and get involved. 

The Nu. Wardrobe, founded by Aisling Byrne and Ali Kelly who met during their time at Trinity College Dublin, were both searching for ways to dress in ways which allowed them to look good and feel ethical, and realised that borrowing clothes was a formula for success.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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They began running swap-shops in university, gradually garnering a following. This led them further to create the Nu. Wardrobe, a female-led startup website based on the concept of renting out clothes for a small amount of time in order to drastically reduce waste and to encourage consumerism which doesn’t harm the planet.

Members of the Nu. Community can upload images of their clothes, and swap with other members online with their own Nu. profile. The items are affordable and the fashion is accessible, and by sharing clothes with more than just your friends, the life-cycle of our clothes is extended hugely.

The duo expanded their brand into a team of gal pals ‘in the non-gender-specific sense’, who are all empowered to change the fashion industry for the better. Their goal is to raise awareness of the negative impact of the fashion industry, and to build a revolutionised community of chic changemakers.

Women deserve to feel confident and represented without harming the planet. The ladies are steadily redefining what it means to wear something ‘new’. Sign us up!

Check out their website or send them an email at info@nuwardrobe.com

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