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sustainable

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Festival fashion is one of the most sought-after gems in the style calendar, but trends have most definitely shifted in 2019 into a more sustainable environment. Rightfully so.

Rather than buying entirely new wardrobes for each music festival attended, the rise of the rental is upon us as well as the overwhelming popularity of vintage clothes.

The billion-dollar festival fashion scene is a whole new ball game since the rise of apps like Instagram, capturing celebrity fashion at Coachella, Reading, Parklife, Electric Picnic and Glastonbury. 

A fast fashion extravaganza has been the result, with millions of euros spent on clothing for festival wear each year. The fashion industry is the second-biggest water polluter on earth, after the oil industry.

Outlandish, aesthetically-dramatic outfits which normally wouldn't be worn are donned, but with the rise of ethical and sustainable fashion, what are this year's trends? 

Vintage styles are setting the trend agenda this festival season, as shown by global fashion search engine Lyst.

The company identified the major trends for festival season by gathering analysis on the shopping behaviours of over five million people based on social media metrics and search data.

It discovered that the 1990s are well and truly the decade to be apart of. Search results for staples from the time such as neon, bucket hats, tie-dye, chunky sports sandals and graphic t-shirts have all increased.

“Sustainability is an issue that more and more customers care about on Lyst,” the organisation's insights reporter, Morane Le Caer, told The Independent.

1. Biodegradable glitter

Some festivals have already taken action when it comes to the harmful effects of glitter on the environment by pledging to ban glitter from their sites as part of a wider outlaw on single-use plastics.

In case you aren't aware, glitter contains micro-plastics which take hundreds of years to break down, so can cause a phenomenal amount of damage (despite it's small size).

However, you simply can't remove glitter from the festival landscape so a solution has been created; biodegradable glitter. 

Penneys P.S…Festival collection, prices from €2.50 upwards

As it turns out, you can be savvy about the environment while dancing the night away in a field simultaneously.

There are a huge amount of fantastic brands emerging which promote sustainability and recyclable materials, but our faves include;

EcoStardust, Dolls Kill 'Go Get Glitter', In Your Dreams, Festival Face, Primark P.S…Festival collection, BOD Mermaid Body and Eco Glitter Fun.

2. Tiny '90s sunglasses

With the coming of summer brings iconic vintage trends, predominantly from the nineties this year. What was one of the greatest aspects of that era? Tiny sunglasses, of course.

Style icons like Rihanna, Bella Hadid and Selena Gomez have caught on to the trend, which was based around cinematic veterans from the 90s sporting small sunnies in films like Notting Hill (Julia Roberts) and supermodels like Kate Moss.

Are you even a fashionista if you aren't wearing teeny, tiny sunglasses? Probably not. If Kendall Jenner is copying 1999 Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Britney Spears, then you should probably try it too.

You can normally find the best pairs by thrift shopping or visiting places like Dublin Vintage Factory or Nine Crows vintage, but ASOS and ASOS Marketplace also do great coloured oval sunglasses.

3. Sequins

Sequins as a festival trend will most likely never change.

It's the perfect way to grab the spotlight from the artists and firmly place it on yourself, and it's distracting in all the best ways if you haven't washed your hair at Electric Picnic in three days.

Vintage shopping for sequins is one of the most fun activities in the land, and you can find some sparkly gems in most places.

ASOS Marketplace has an extensive selection, and we can't get enough of the co-ords.

All that glitters may not quite be gold, but they can give you a killer look for the next music festival you attend with your gal-pals.

Fashion will always have an obsession with sparkle, with major couture designers utilising sequins with precision. It trickles down to the festivals, where everyone wants to have the most eye-catching apparel.

4. Attention-grabbing hats

From '90s bucket hats and cowboy hats to sequinned military-style caps and printed beanies, when you're having a festival hair day with unwashed tresses; hats will be thy saviour.

Black leather baker boy hats have been spotted on the Nine Crows website, and ASOS Marketplace has an array of velvet and sequinned berets to get your hands on.

Depop is also your best friend when it comes to items like these. The clothes-selling app has millions of users, and is a brilliant place to buy and sell second-hand clothes and vintage goodies.

Somehow, summer always grabs onto the trend of bucket hats every single year. We've seen countless boys at Longitude (RIP) sporting branded Kangol bucket hats, but the vintage headgear remain cool.

While fast fashion brands will bring out their own lines of bucket hats and eye-catching caps, there's nowhere better than vintage stores to get the original '90s vibe.

Temple Bar has numerous shops to rifle through, but some are better for accessories than others. Online stores like Beyond Retro in the UK have a great collection too, and Depop sellers have gorgeous options.

5. Sportswear (cycling shorts, chunky sandals, windbreakers)

The Kardashians and Kanye West are partially credited with reigniting the luxe sportswear trend, and the nineties 'athleisure' fad is officially back.

Sportswear that doubles up as festival wear is definitely on the rise, with cycling shorts and chunky runners seen on high-fashion runways and in high street stores alike.

We're fairly sure the Tour de France wasn't intending on beginning a cycling shorts trend, but here we are.

It's got nothing to do with exercise or physical performance, but everything to do with looking festival fierce in a flash.

Princess Diana's mid-90s style and Yeezy's obsession with form-fitting athleisure have both caused an influx in people searching for leggings and patterned cycling shorts online.

Labels like Fendi, Dior, Chanel, Nanushka, and Maryam Nassir Zadeh all showcasing stylised riffs on cycling shorts in their runway collections recently, with the addition of neon to prove peak 90s.

Wear with an oversized blazer and statement belt if your shorts aren't eye-catching enough at Electric Picnic.

Patterned all-in-one by Tara Khorzad LDN at ASOS Marketplace, €69.55

With vintage and sustainable shopping on the increase, nailing these five festival fashion trends in the 2019 season will be easier, and cheaper, than ever but with a less negative environmental impact.

You don't need an entirely new wardrobe to slay the styles. It just takes some dedication and creativity, and the knowledge of the best second-hand places to shop.

Do yourself a favour and download Depop while you're at it. The '90s will be all over your campsite aesthetic in no time.

black and white 90s GIF

Feature image: Purple lens sunnies by Vintings at ASOS Marketplace, €11.76

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Aim to sustain is our new motto, given the current climate emergency.

We're pure delighted that ASOS Marketplace exists purely for the purpose of bringing you the hottest vintage, charity and independent store boutiques in the business.

Tracking down the best fashion pieces that are vintage or sustainable online can be a tricky challenge, but we've chosen our top 10 from the website for you. 

1. Just Harry on ASOS Marketplace: patchwork recycled denim dungarees, €171.60

ASOS Marketplace/@just harry 

2. Em's the Label at ASOS Marketplace: festival boob tube in patchwork, €20.80

ASOS Marketplace/@em's the label

3. Levi's on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 80s Levi's Reworked Pocket Mom Jeans Light Wash/0217, €37.43

ASOS Marketplace/@levi's

4. Braderie on ASOS Marketplace: Reworked vintage floral two-piece set, €24.96

ASOS Marketplace/@braderie

5. Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 90s platinum blazer jacket, €50.96

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

6. Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace, 90s gold chunky chain with diamante star pendant, €20.80

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

7. Dark Paradise Vintage at ASOS Marketplace, vintage 90s Y2K metallic purple backless dress, €46.80

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

8. 2Point5D at ASOS Marketplace, Reworked kitsch yellow brick road Wizard of Oz jacket, €72.80

ASOS Marketplace/@2Point5D

9. Sisterhood at ASOS Marketplace, midi slip dress in gold, €67.60

ASOS Marketplace/@sisterhood

10. Sisterhood at ASOS Marketplace, 100% sustainable cotton floral dress, €67.60

ASOS Marketplace/@sisterhood

11.  Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 90s clear PVC chunky handbag, €40.56

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

Work those fierce looks all day long, safe in the knowledge that you haven't caused any more harm to the environment by contributing to the textiles industry.

Definitely try to check whether or not these storefront boutiques online package their goods in biodegradable materials as well, if you can. Sustainably slay all day.

ken doll flirting GIF

Feature image: Dark Paradise Vintage/ASOS Marketplace 

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With the rise of eco-consciousness, it's no surprise that certain popular brands are catching up to the importance of sustainable materials.

Primark's homewear ranges are always ones to watch, but their latest collection featuring 100 percent sustainable cotton has us racing down to the store.

A fresh set of bedding can be the pinnacle of bedroom relaxation, and their latest range is perfect for your bed-time oasis of calm.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@primark.home) on

Primark have taken inspiration from refined Nordic interiors, creating a selection of soft Scandinavian greys and crisp white linens for the ideal minimalistic home.

The range serves as the perfect base for colour blocking with your favourite colours. The fresh, spa-worthy sustainable towels add to the theme, and are only €9 each.

Small wire basket €4, large basket €6
Image: Primark Home

Primark's reusable cup is just €6, for those of you who no longer want to waste cardboard takeaway coffee/tea cups.

The rise in popularity of Keep Cups are most likely contributing to brands like Primark focusing on reusable homewear features.

Image: Primark Home

Their gorgeous striped duvet cover single set comes in at the affordable price of €11, the double is just €16 while the king is €20.

Utilising sustainable materials such as cotton rather than microplastics of synthetic materials (polyester) can do wonders for the environment. 

Supporting brands like Primark in their quest to reduce harmful materials is hugely important, and the affordability can't be denied. Why not head down and check out the latest range before it sells out? 

Feature image: Instagram/@primark.home

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We've only recently realised just how wasteful the make-up and cosmetic industry is, seeing as pretty much every product is made using single-use plastic packaging.

We will forever worship our Urban Decay Naked palettes, and that love can't just go away, but it's time we search for more sustainable options while still looking slammin' every day.

Eyeshadow application isn't as easy as all the YouTubers and beauty bloggers have us believe. Not all of us are seasoned #MUAs, or had beauty tutorials to pore over when we were growing up. 

We've all butchered a smoky eye in our time, gotten irritable product in our eyes or chose the worst possible colour to spread across our lids; but what if a product was fully recyclable and easy to apply?

The world's first stick-on eyeshadow has FINALLY been created, and is bringing practical and beautiful products to our lives. Talk about sustainably slaying the game, wow.

Beauty buffs are absolutely raving about the new eco-friendly treat, which is the first ever fully-recyclable eyeshadow. Yes, that includes packaging, applicators AND the pigments themselves.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@majicbeautycosmetics) on

Majic Beauty's 'eyeMajic' Instant Eyeshadow is the first transferable eyeshadow which uses a heat-sensitive applicator to apply makeup to the eyelid in one easy swipe.

The product is totally hygienic, non-toxic and is 100 percent free of bacteria as well as paraben-free, cruelty-free and devoid of irritating fillers or preservatives. It's eco-certified too, we may actually faint.

The genius 'eyeMajic' is available in a whole spectrum of colour combinations online, from earthy browns and golds to metallics, shimmery pastels and matte or smoky shades.

The eyeshadow is made with extremely fine-grade pigment particles to formulate a rich, long-lasting colour and the applicators are all biodegradable.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@majicbeautycosmetics) on

The reviews on Amazon are nothing short of glowing, so the product definitely delivers what it hopes to. Imagine…you can have Eye-con beauty status while being kind to our environment?

'eyeMajic' buyers describe the product as easy to use with fantastic results, with make-up artists themselves recommending them for both pros and beginners.

It won't cost a bomb as well to slay the game while hugging the planet; at €6.69 a pack, 'eyeMajic' is a bargain. Don't miss out on the latest cult beauty product, it's set to go viral.

Feature image: Instagram/@majicbeautycosmetics

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Depop is one of the greatest tools in your arsenal when it comes to buying and selling items of clothing.

The legendary buy-and-sell app is getting increasingly popular by the day, especially with the rise of sustainable fashion and ethical shopping.

Buying pre-owned and pre-loved styles will hopefully keep on rising in popularity, otherwise the planet may just burn to shreds at an even faster rate (not even joking!?).

Depop has many lovable traits. The search bar allows you to find gorgeous vintage pieces within Ireland for an incredibly affordable price, and you can also extend your search party worldwide if you're willing to pay for shipping costs.

A seller can also make a pretty penny from selling your old clothes that you NEVER wear anymore (we've sold about 34 dresses we haven't even seen since our Wezz days for a great profit).

The explore page when you first enter the app also has top picks based on your likes and preferences, and also the Depop app's own favourite shops they've got their eye on. 

Beverly Hills 90210 Fashion GIF by CBS All Access

Without further fashion ado, here are our Depop top picks for today. Nab them before they're sold:

1. Vintage deadstock 1990s flare jeans
    Size 6, Price: £30 (€32)

Image: Depop/@lochrian

2. Vintage pink pastel mini-dress  
    Size 10, Price: £39 (€42.55)

Image: Depop/@kaohinani

3. Early 1990s vintage designer mesh dress by Betsey Johnson
    Size XS, Price: £150 (€164)

Image: Depop/@eleanorehly

4. Faux fur cow jacket
    Size 8-10, Price: £50 (€54.60)

Image: Depop/@whatthefluff_

5. Baby blue plaid Nike Air Force 1
    Size: Womens 8.5, Price: $100 (€90)

Image: Depop/@yslej

6. Vintage Jane Norman chainmail shoulder bag
    Price:
 £20 (€21.80)

Image: Depop/@hazzledazzled

7. Vintage Karen Millen baby pink suit
    UK size 8, Price: £45 (€49)

Image: Depop/@shannoncastro

8. Vintage patchwork frayed denim jeans
    Size UK 10, Price: £95 (€103.60)

 

Image: Depop/@siandrakard

 9. Upcycled linen Topshop midi dress
     Size: UK 12, Price: £27.50 (€30)

Depop/@wildergren

10. Hippy style Miss Sixty flare jeans
      Size: UK 8-10, Price: £110 (€120)

Depop/@eviehallows

11. Rare 1980s vintage Adidas originals sweatshirt in purple and turquoise
      Size: M, Price: £75 (€81)

Depop/@james27west

12. Vintage Richards bolt blouse with stunning button details
      Size: 8-10, Price: £35 (€37.90)

Depop/@maidmessy

Shop to your heart's content knowing that you aren't causing damage to the environment by adding to the textiles industry, it's a good feeling.

Feature image: Instagram/@depop

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We were already obsessed with Bleach London before they rebranded their packaging as 100 percent recycled cardboard and eco-friendly materials.

Honestly, their vegan formulas give us the best colours in hair as well as makeup, while maintaining a conscience.

Every since their sustainably-focused packaging rebrand, we've become unhealthily addicted to the energetic cosmetic company, and you will be too.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@coleoftheball) on

Co-founders of the brand, Alex Brownsell and Sam Campbell, made absolutely sure that their relaunched packaging was made from environmentally sound materials.

In our humble opinion, every makeup, skincare and cosmetics brand needs to follow suit. The vast amount of waste and plastic in landfill coming from the industry is mind-blowing.

The lads and their waste-not attitude led to the brand's customisation palettes.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ohshipitsjess) on

These palettes come in a magnetic box and allow you to buy individual eyeshadow colours and collect them. The boxes come in a larger size for home use and a smaller one for on-the-go.

We're all guilty of only using one or two eyeshadow colours out of an entire palette, so why not curate your own kit and simply refill it when it runs out? Simples.

Bleach London 'Metallic Louder Powder', €5.60 (£5)

This translates to less waste, and a more sustainable beauty regimen. Bleach London's incredible hair range has also been totally vegan since 2017.

The company have a strictly cruelty-free ethos and are PETA-approved as part of their Beauty Without Bunnies programme. They're essentially magicians of beauty.

'Metallic Louder Powders' by Bleach London are available online for the affordable price of €5.60.

Feature image: Bleach London

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Plastic Free July is upon us, but the question is: Will you take up the challenge?

The initiative is a global movement that helps millions of people to be part of the solution to plastic pollution in order to have cleaner oceans, cities and environments.

The overall action is simple: Choose to make small, easy changes and refuse single-use plastics. 

Plastic Free July is all about reducing plastic consumption in order to free the world from plastic waste.

The initiative itself is run by a non-profit organisation called The Plastic Free Foundation, founded in 2011 by Rebecca Prince-Ruiz in Australia.

Organisers say that the movement is "designed to help people refuse single use plastic and improve recycling practices". Single-use or disposable plastics are used once before thrown away into landfill.

It's hoped that the large-scale challenge will "drive positive change through simple solutions that help communities live more sustainably".

Plastic-Free July also aims to "kick-start long-lasting solutions and influence business and governments to take action" to improve their environmental approach in a number of areas, including recycling.

Businesses desperately need to move towards a "circular economy"(promoting the reuse of materials) and for producers to take more responsibility over the end-of-life of products.

The consequences of plastic

Plastic bags often break ups into micro pieces that can easily blow into nature and, if mistaken for food and ingested, end up being fatal to animals

Plastic takes hundreds of years to break down in landfill, if it even breaks down at all, and reducing our use of plastic can help to counteract this.

Reducing waste overall is a better alternative to recycling, which uses a lot of water and energy, but we're all doing our best and changing what we can in our lives to alter our carbon footprints.

Top tips for Plastic Free July:

-Buy a 'KeepCup' and refuse to use a takeaway coffee cup. Even the 'recyclable' ones end up in landfill, so choose to dine in at your local café or bring a reusable cup.

-Plastic straws: Buy a metal straw and refuse plastic or paper straws as often as you can. There are now options to buy foldable metal straws to slot into your purse easily.

-Choose not to buy pre-packaged fruit and vegetables when you're doing the weekly shopping. Go to a local grocer, organic shop or farmer's market with a tote bag and collect your own loose fruit and vegetables instead, and save yourself all that single-use plastic. Support stores that offer paper bags rather than plastic bags, and who grow the food in Ireland.

-Don't buy pre-packaged meat: Support local butchers and bring your own containers to the shop. This scenario is only if you even eat meat at all, a plant-based, vegan diet is better for reducing waste and your carbon footprint.

-Choose to refuse single-use plastic shopping bags. Save yourself money by bringing your own reusable bags, and prevent as much landfill building up as possible. Plastic bags are incredible dangerous for wildlife and environment. You could even consider making your own reusable shopping bags using repurposed fabric, like the 'Boomerang Bags' movement. Bags made from natural fibres are a better option if possible, made from ethically-produced cotton, jute, hemp or recycled plastic bottles.

-Choose to refuse plastic bin liners: Line the bin with a few sheets of newspaper, or try using certified compostable bin liner bags. You can even use the bin as a ‘naked bin’, and simply washing it out as needed, or try home composting. Composting helps food scraps to deteriorate rather than producing methane from anaerobic landfill.

-Use lunch-boxes instead of packaging for food, and support vendors that offer cardboard or recyclable utensils and packaging rather than plastic knives and forks.

-BYOB: Bring your own bottle. Buying single-use plastic bottles year-round can cause a huge amount of damage, but it's incredibly easy to carry a reusable water bottle around with you. Carry small tote bags in your purse too in case you're in a situation where you need to reject using a plastic bag.

-Bamboo toothbrushes: Plastic toothbrushes can take 500 years to break down, but buying bamboo has never been as easy. Try buying organic toothpaste in recyclable packaging too.

-Avoid clingfilm like the devil: Wrap your food in cloths or keep it in containers instead rather than using single-use clingfilm to keep items fresh.

-Bin audits: Make sure the bins in your workplace, home and anywhere else are separated by category. Divide them into recyclable waste, general waste and compost bins, or by material (glass, cardboard, paper, plastic, etc). 

-Community clean-ups: Organise a group of friends, colleagues or community members to clean up specific areas around you. As well as improving your local environment, it shows a good example of teamwork for positive change and engagement. Use social media to gather and include as many people as possible.

-Cosmetic industry and wipes: There are many options for removing your make-up or washing your face that don't use micro-plastics and harmful irritants like wipes. Reusable cloths and biodegradable wipes are sold on numerous online beauty websites and are extremely effective, and try bringing your make-up palettes to be refilled in The Body Shop. Going make-up free for the month of July would be a big challenge, but reducing cosmetic waste and using skincare products made with recyclable packaging will create a beneficial impact.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@reduceplastic1) on

-Ask your local shops to use biodegradable products, and to support brands that use recyclable packaging or minimal packaging. Companies will listen if enough customers speak out.

-Spread the word: Talk to your co-workers, your friends, your family and neighbours about their lifestyle choices and how they may be impacting the environment. It may just take some encouragement for them to change small aspects of their lives and reduce their plastic usage.

Head over to the website here to take the Plastic Free July pledge, you'll be glad you did.

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Most of us don't think twice about plastic in our make-up and beauty regime. Yet once it's pointed out to us, it's completely unavoidable; plastic is EVERYWHERE in beauty.

From eyeshadow palettes to shampoo bottles, plastic toothbrushes which take over 400 years to decompose, foundation which isn't ethically sourced to packaging which could easily be replaced with recyclable equivalents; beauty is problematic when it comes to our environment.

What do we mean by sustainable cosmetics? Essentially; fair wages for workers, recyclable and biodegradable packaging, ethically sourced and natural, cruelty-free ingredients, renewable resources. In summary: doing no harm to the planet, other people or animals in the process.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Solid Waste Management Program (@omsarswmp) on

Sounds great, doesn't it? So many of us tune out when we hear things about the environment; it all just seems overwhelmingly impossible to face it head-on.

Yet swapping your beauty routine for a greener option is SO easy, even small changes have large repercussions. We each must think individually about our own actions, rather than the planet as a whole.

Here are our top tips for reducing your carbon footprint through your beauty regimen…IT'S VITAL that we embrace the change.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Humble Co. #HumbleBrush (@thehumble.co) on

1. Swap plastic toothbrushes for bamboo counterparts.

Toothbrushes are constantly bought and thrown away, without a single thought about where it goes after our bins are emptied. Basically, it heads to landfill, where plastic takes up to 1000 years to break down. Incredible, isn't it?

Changing your toothbrush for a bamboo one can HUGELY reduce the harm caused by your oral hygiene.

The Humble Co. sell great ones, check out their website here. You can also pop into your nearest Holland and Barrett health store. Pair it with Fig + Yarrow Cornmint Lavender Tooth Powder, which comes in little recyclable/reusable glass bottle and is created with white clay, sea salt, baking soda, and antibacterial essential oils.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Humble Co. #HumbleBrush (@thehumble.co) on

2. Recycle your empty make-up containers in stores now

Since the creation of plastics, humans have made 8.3 billion metric tonnes of it. Of that amount, an incredible 6.3 billion metric tonnes have already been thrown out and 91 percent of that waste has NOT been recycled. It makes a lot of sense now why governments and communities are raising support for the banning of single-use plastics…

Make sure that your plastic bottles and empty make-up sets are recycled properly; companies such as Lush, The Body Shop and L'Occitane have unreal reward systems for returning your plastic packaging to the stores.

More stores are committed to limiting their impact on the environment. L'Occitane's new initiative with TerraCycle enables the recycling of beauty products from any brand. TerraCycle is a collection and recycling programme which specialises in difficult-to-recycle packaging, so they know their stuff.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by TerraCycle (@terracycle) on

Any L'Occitane customers can recycle their empties at any store now. Thirty-five percent of Lush products are sold 'naked' (with no packaging), so zero-waste washing is absolutely possible. Their products sold in pots and bottles are 100 percent post-consumer plastic. 

Save and return five clean, black pots to any local Lush store for a free face mask; you give back and you get in return. 

3. Know your brands, and choose ones who are HONEST about where their ingredients and packaging come from.

It's not difficult to be totally aware of what you're consuming and if it's harming anyone else. Send Instagram DMs or email the company to ask if the information isn't readily available on their packaging or websites. Hint: if the information is hard to find, it's probably NOT a good company to go with.

There are so many incredible natural, cruelty free and ethical make-up brands around now; Bia Beauty is an up-and-coming Irish brand we adore. Beauty Without Cruelty products for sensitive skin are considered among the best on the market. 

Lush are another company who partner with the Ocean Legacy Foundation to use recovered plastic from the ocean as material.

Christopher Davis, who is The Body Shop's international director of campaigns and corporate responsibility, said the brand is undertaking a "comprehensive review" of sustainable packaging choices. They are hoping to remove fossil fuels from 70 percent of its product packaging by 2020.

"Our long-term vision is that packaging will not harm people or the environment and can be repurposed," says Davis. "All our solutions need to be truly sustainable."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Body Shop Official (@thebodyshop) on

4. Get smart about your container use.

Why not try and use bars of shampoo rather than bottles? Numerous shops now have methods of bringing your own plastic bottles which have been recycled to collect any goods from the store, so they don't waste packaging.

Reuse empty make-up plastic packaging for something more creative. You can also try and use powdered deodorant or bars of soap instead of the spray-cans. For pump-bottles, you should generally throw away the pump before recycling as the metal springs inside can’t be recycled.

Once part of it isn't recyclable, it nearly always ends up in landfill or the sea, and we don't want that. Oh, and GET A METAL STRAW right this minute.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Axiology (@axiology_beauty) on

Terracycle has a partnership with Bausch & Lomb which aims to recycle contacts, blister packs, and the top foil from contact lenses, if you wear glasses. Terracycle also have an incredible partnership with Garnier, which recycles ANY hair care, skin care, and cosmetics packaging. 

5. Use recyclable make-up remover pads or a face cloth instead of wipes.

 According to the FDA, wipes are made from an amalgamation of ingredients such as polyester, polypropylene, cotton, wood pulp, and rayon fibres. Many of these are not biodegradable, but some wipes are compostable, such as RMS Beauty and Yes To.

We recommend the MakeUp Eraser remover cloths, they're absolutely life-changing. Buy them on iHerb at a great price, and never look back. The Cleanse Off Mit is another wonderful option; all machine-washable.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Original MakeUp Eraser (@makeuperaser) on

6. Eco-brushes

Pretty much every make-up brush is made from plastic, but we've discovered some alternatives. EcoTools brushes are made from recycled bamboo, recycled aluminium, and some recycled plastic: GORGE.

Morphe also has a beautiful 18-piece vegan brush set that we have our eyes firmly set on. ZOEVA do bamboo brush sets via Beauty Bay's website, for a heftier price.

In terms of hair brushes, try the WetBrush Go Green Detangler Brush, which is made of plant starch and designed to break down within five years.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by EcoTools (@ecotools) on

7. Eco-lipstick

AXIOLOGY is your go-to for non-toxic lipstick. They value a holistic, vegan lifestyle and are 100 percent transparent about where their ingredients come from. The brand is pretty expensive if you're a student or on a lower wage, but it's excellent quality and totally ethical. Their boxes are sourced by Bali women who recycle local waste into paper.

The founder of AXIOLOGY, Ericka Rodriguez, is proud to use no palm oil or palm oil derivatives in their goods; "Palm oil is causing widespread deforestation and causing the extinction of many animal species. We donate to the Orangutan Foundation International to help the orangutans during this crisis."

Once again, go for plastic-free lipstick holders or lip liners if possible, or at least recyclable options. Check out earth911.com to find out about your plastic bottles and recycling options. Over 40 percent of the plastic we use is in the form of packaging, so it's time to change.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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8. Ditch those plastic disposable razors ASAP

Girlos who shave, it's time to get a razor you can use again and again. Throwing away constant disposable plastic razors causes phenomenal harm to the environment, and we are so much better than that, ain't we? The EPA estimates 2 BILLION razors are thrown away each year….wow.

You can find a reusable, stainless steel razor in any major retailer, and can get reusable blades for cheap. It's cost-effective and eco-friendly beauty, let's DO IT. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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9. Invest in double-duty products

Do you really need sun-cream AND foundation AND highlighter AND concealer AND moisturiser AND primer AND bronzer AND setting spray AND powder? We're guessing not.

Try choosing products which double-duty; like SPF BB creams, lip primers which have moisturising properties, tinted moisturisers etc. Minimise as much as you can, and really think about what you need versus what you want.

10. Tampons

Disposable tampon applicators are one of the BIGGEST forms of ocean plastic pollution. Why not try switching to applicator-less tampons, or invest in a menstrual cup. The cups last for up to 10 years, producing far less waste than disposable menstrual products, and avoid the chemicals present in tampons.

They also save you a lot of money over time, and are becoming far more popular as more women in Ireland try them out. In terms of applicator-free tampons, try Emerita.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Finally: Campaign for change.

Contact product manufacturers, give feedback to brands and express your wish that plastic they use is recyclable. Annoy them if you must; consumer pressure makes a significant difference. You can make the change.

It's worth a shot, lobby your local TDs so we can improve environmental laws. Email your favourite make-up brands, show your support for eco-friendly and ethical companies especially.

You can do it gals, a little change goes a long way.

Feature image: eco warrior princess

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