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Festival fashion is one of the most sought-after gems in the style calendar, but trends have most definitely shifted in 2019 into a more sustainable environment. Rightfully so.

Rather than buying entirely new wardrobes for each music festival attended, the rise of the rental is upon us as well as the overwhelming popularity of vintage clothes.

The billion-dollar festival fashion scene is a whole new ball game since the rise of apps like Instagram, capturing celebrity fashion at Coachella, Reading, Parklife, Electric Picnic and Glastonbury. 

A fast fashion extravaganza has been the result, with millions of euros spent on clothing for festival wear each year. The fashion industry is the second-biggest water polluter on earth, after the oil industry.

Outlandish, aesthetically-dramatic outfits which normally wouldn't be worn are donned, but with the rise of ethical and sustainable fashion, what are this year's trends? 

Vintage styles are setting the trend agenda this festival season, as shown by global fashion search engine Lyst.

The company identified the major trends for festival season by gathering analysis on the shopping behaviours of over five million people based on social media metrics and search data.

It discovered that the 1990s are well and truly the decade to be apart of. Search results for staples from the time such as neon, bucket hats, tie-dye, chunky sports sandals and graphic t-shirts have all increased.

“Sustainability is an issue that more and more customers care about on Lyst,” the organisation's insights reporter, Morane Le Caer, told The Independent.

1. Biodegradable glitter

Some festivals have already taken action when it comes to the harmful effects of glitter on the environment by pledging to ban glitter from their sites as part of a wider outlaw on single-use plastics.

In case you aren't aware, glitter contains micro-plastics which take hundreds of years to break down, so can cause a phenomenal amount of damage (despite it's small size).

However, you simply can't remove glitter from the festival landscape so a solution has been created; biodegradable glitter. 

Penneys P.S…Festival collection, prices from €2.50 upwards

As it turns out, you can be savvy about the environment while dancing the night away in a field simultaneously.

There are a huge amount of fantastic brands emerging which promote sustainability and recyclable materials, but our faves include;

EcoStardust, Dolls Kill 'Go Get Glitter', In Your Dreams, Festival Face, Primark P.S…Festival collection, BOD Mermaid Body and Eco Glitter Fun.

2. Tiny '90s sunglasses

With the coming of summer brings iconic vintage trends, predominantly from the nineties this year. What was one of the greatest aspects of that era? Tiny sunglasses, of course.

Style icons like Rihanna, Bella Hadid and Selena Gomez have caught on to the trend, which was based around cinematic veterans from the 90s sporting small sunnies in films like Notting Hill (Julia Roberts) and supermodels like Kate Moss.

Are you even a fashionista if you aren't wearing teeny, tiny sunglasses? Probably not. If Kendall Jenner is copying 1999 Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Britney Spears, then you should probably try it too.

You can normally find the best pairs by thrift shopping or visiting places like Dublin Vintage Factory or Nine Crows vintage, but ASOS and ASOS Marketplace also do great coloured oval sunglasses.

3. Sequins

Sequins as a festival trend will most likely never change.

It's the perfect way to grab the spotlight from the artists and firmly place it on yourself, and it's distracting in all the best ways if you haven't washed your hair at Electric Picnic in three days.

Vintage shopping for sequins is one of the most fun activities in the land, and you can find some sparkly gems in most places.

ASOS Marketplace has an extensive selection, and we can't get enough of the co-ords.

All that glitters may not quite be gold, but they can give you a killer look for the next music festival you attend with your gal-pals.

Fashion will always have an obsession with sparkle, with major couture designers utilising sequins with precision. It trickles down to the festivals, where everyone wants to have the most eye-catching apparel.

4. Attention-grabbing hats

From '90s bucket hats and cowboy hats to sequinned military-style caps and printed beanies, when you're having a festival hair day with unwashed tresses; hats will be thy saviour.

Black leather baker boy hats have been spotted on the Nine Crows website, and ASOS Marketplace has an array of velvet and sequinned berets to get your hands on.

Depop is also your best friend when it comes to items like these. The clothes-selling app has millions of users, and is a brilliant place to buy and sell second-hand clothes and vintage goodies.

Somehow, summer always grabs onto the trend of bucket hats every single year. We've seen countless boys at Longitude (RIP) sporting branded Kangol bucket hats, but the vintage headgear remain cool.

While fast fashion brands will bring out their own lines of bucket hats and eye-catching caps, there's nowhere better than vintage stores to get the original '90s vibe.

Temple Bar has numerous shops to rifle through, but some are better for accessories than others. Online stores like Beyond Retro in the UK have a great collection too, and Depop sellers have gorgeous options.

5. Sportswear (cycling shorts, chunky sandals, windbreakers)

The Kardashians and Kanye West are partially credited with reigniting the luxe sportswear trend, and the nineties 'athleisure' fad is officially back.

Sportswear that doubles up as festival wear is definitely on the rise, with cycling shorts and chunky runners seen on high-fashion runways and in high street stores alike.

We're fairly sure the Tour de France wasn't intending on beginning a cycling shorts trend, but here we are.

It's got nothing to do with exercise or physical performance, but everything to do with looking festival fierce in a flash.

Princess Diana's mid-90s style and Yeezy's obsession with form-fitting athleisure have both caused an influx in people searching for leggings and patterned cycling shorts online.

Labels like Fendi, Dior, Chanel, Nanushka, and Maryam Nassir Zadeh all showcasing stylised riffs on cycling shorts in their runway collections recently, with the addition of neon to prove peak 90s.

Wear with an oversized blazer and statement belt if your shorts aren't eye-catching enough at Electric Picnic.

Patterned all-in-one by Tara Khorzad LDN at ASOS Marketplace, €69.55

With vintage and sustainable shopping on the increase, nailing these five festival fashion trends in the 2019 season will be easier, and cheaper, than ever but with a less negative environmental impact.

You don't need an entirely new wardrobe to slay the styles. It just takes some dedication and creativity, and the knowledge of the best second-hand places to shop.

Do yourself a favour and download Depop while you're at it. The '90s will be all over your campsite aesthetic in no time.

black and white 90s GIF

Feature image: Purple lens sunnies by Vintings at ASOS Marketplace, €11.76

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Depop is one of the greatest tools in your arsenal when it comes to buying and selling items of clothing.

The legendary buy-and-sell app is getting increasingly popular by the day, especially with the rise of sustainable fashion and ethical shopping.

Buying pre-owned and pre-loved styles will hopefully keep on rising in popularity, otherwise the planet may just burn to shreds at an even faster rate (not even joking!?).

Depop has many lovable traits. The search bar allows you to find gorgeous vintage pieces within Ireland for an incredibly affordable price, and you can also extend your search party worldwide if you're willing to pay for shipping costs.

A seller can also make a pretty penny from selling your old clothes that you NEVER wear anymore (we've sold about 34 dresses we haven't even seen since our Wezz days for a great profit).

The explore page when you first enter the app also has top picks based on your likes and preferences, and also the Depop app's own favourite shops they've got their eye on. 

Beverly Hills 90210 Fashion GIF by CBS All Access

Without further fashion ado, here are our Depop top picks for today. Nab them before they're sold:

1. Vintage deadstock 1990s flare jeans
    Size 6, Price: £30 (€32)

Image: Depop/@lochrian

2. Vintage pink pastel mini-dress  
    Size 10, Price: £39 (€42.55)

Image: Depop/@kaohinani

3. Early 1990s vintage designer mesh dress by Betsey Johnson
    Size XS, Price: £150 (€164)

Image: Depop/@eleanorehly

4. Faux fur cow jacket
    Size 8-10, Price: £50 (€54.60)

Image: Depop/@whatthefluff_

5. Baby blue plaid Nike Air Force 1
    Size: Womens 8.5, Price: $100 (€90)

Image: Depop/@yslej

6. Vintage Jane Norman chainmail shoulder bag
    Price:
 £20 (€21.80)

Image: Depop/@hazzledazzled

7. Vintage Karen Millen baby pink suit
    UK size 8, Price: £45 (€49)

Image: Depop/@shannoncastro

8. Vintage patchwork frayed denim jeans
    Size UK 10, Price: £95 (€103.60)

 

Image: Depop/@siandrakard

 9. Upcycled linen Topshop midi dress
     Size: UK 12, Price: £27.50 (€30)

Depop/@wildergren

10. Hippy style Miss Sixty flare jeans
      Size: UK 8-10, Price: £110 (€120)

Depop/@eviehallows

11. Rare 1980s vintage Adidas originals sweatshirt in purple and turquoise
      Size: M, Price: £75 (€81)

Depop/@james27west

12. Vintage Richards bolt blouse with stunning button details
      Size: 8-10, Price: £35 (€37.90)

Depop/@maidmessy

Shop to your heart's content knowing that you aren't causing damage to the environment by adding to the textiles industry, it's a good feeling.

Feature image: Instagram/@depop

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Eco-friendly shopping carts can go farther than we can ever imagine, and now high street retailers and online stores are starting to realise that fact.

ASOS has launched an ethically-minded and sustainable edit of clothes on their website to give eco-conscious customers a wider range of choice while shopping.

Filling your wardrobe with sustainable clothes has never been easier, though fast fashion means that we need to cut down on shopping full stop and instead actually wear the clothes we currently own…

The fashion etailer's consumers can now browse collections from brands who use either recycled or sustainable materials.

New products will be added to the edit daily and will bring a wider range of filters over the next few months, according to Drapers.

The initiative means that shoppers can focus on environmental and ethical measures like animal welfare, waste reduction in the supply chain and locally made produce.

Online retailer Boohoo recently launched a recycled collection entitled For The Future this week, using 95 percent recycled material and made in the UK but many are arguing that these brands are making changes purely as PR stunts.

Changing filters and materials does make a valuable difference, even if the brands are still fuelling fast fashion and consumerism by mass producing items with huge amounts of water and a lack of labour laws.

In 2019 ASOS have been making a conscious effort to stock more eco-friendly pieces than ever, such as 100 percent organic cotton items, a parabens-free jumper or a handmade skirt. Sustainable dyes are also a plus.

Remember that it's always better to wear your own clothes as much as possible and give them some love, or else buy second-hand from vintage shops, charity stores or on Depop.

Producing a single t-shirt uses roughly 2,700 litres of water, and each year over 80 billion pieces of clothing are made across the globe. The textiles industry uses the second highest amount of water, only after the oil industry.

Check your carbon footprint out in the mirror as well as your outfit every morning, it's massively important in today's climate breakdown environment to look at our own actions and make small changes.

Check out our survival guide to shopping sustainably here.

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With all the conversations regarding the decrepit state of our planet, it's no surprise that the terms 'ethical fashion' and 'sustainable clothing' are coming up again and again.

Whether it's the depressing lack of labour rights which garment workers possess, or the untold amount of damage a simple white t-shirt can do to the earth; it's time to get serious about the disastrous environmental impact of fashion.

Fact Attack

1. The truth of the matter is: the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, second only to the oil industry.

Unfortunately, developing countries are constantly the ones to suffer from developed nations and their materialistic consumerist culture. While high street shops have lower pricing, it's important to ask ourselves why this is so.

Normally, it's because the cost of production is incredibly cheap, and the workers aren't being paid in equity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Patagonia Dublin (@patagoniadublin) on

For example, according to Stephen Leahy of The Guardian, 100 million people in India don't have access to drinking water. However, 85 percent of the daily needs of the entire population of India would be provided by the water used to grow the country's cotton.

The same cotton that goes into making our clothes, the clothes of people who have always had access to daily needs like drinking water. So the question is, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Fast fashion is a hugely feminist issue seeing as women in these underdeveloped countries are paid less than men for working in these garment factories.

The number of workplace injuries and deaths in factories in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and Cambodia are still shockingly high.

Now, this article isn't intended to guilt or shame anyone. It's just a wake-up call, and knowing the facts of this vital topic can lead to change. Change can lead to less harm on the planet, and isn't that always a good thing?

2. First of all, it's important to know that the untreated toxic waste-waters from textile factories are often dumped directly into the rivers of countries where clothes are made.

These waste-waters contain toxic substances like arsenic, mercury and lead, which kill the aquatic life and health of millions living by that same river. Contamination reaches the sea and spreads globally.

The use of fertilizers for cotton production heavily pollute waters, another danger of creating just a single item of clothing for brands we all know and buy from. 

Image: Catch News

3. Clothing in our culture has become disposable, and more and more textile waste is accumulating as a result. According to Elizabeth Cline of The Atlantic, a family in the 'western world' throws away an average of 30kg of clothing every year.

4. Only 15 percent of this is recycled or donated, and what happens to the rest? Landfill or incineration.

What's worse, synthetic fibres like polyester are plastic fibres, and can take up to 200 years to decompose.

Global textiles production emits 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases every single year. That's more than international flights and maritime shipping put together, according to Fashion Revolution.

5. These biodegradable synthetic fibres are used in a shocking 72 percent of our clothing. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

6. The UK population has £10.5 billion worth of unworn clothes in their closet, according to recent research. It's massively valuable to donate your unworn clothes rather than throw them away. Every item of apparel has a history, and can tell a story.

Fast fashion is having an unparalleled influence on the planet, with more and more clothes being incinerated into the air every year.

Workers are suffering in poverty to make our clothes, and we have no idea who they even are. We have a responsibility to bring ethics into what we wear and how we style ourselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ethical & Sustainable Fashion (@thekindguide) on

The issue may seem far away, but we can't ignore the problem any longer.

Clothing is a basic human need, give someone else the chance to wear the clothes you don't want anymore.

6. The apparel industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions, because our clothes are made in countries which power their factories with coal.

This means our synthetic fibres are basically made from fossil fuel, hence why it's so important to buy clothes with natural fibres.

Image: Remake

Here's our survival guide for ethical shopping and sustainable fashion, but remember: Nobody's perfect.

Even if you reduce your buying habits a tiny bit, or change one of your high street shops to an ethical brand, that's great. Just do your best; if everyone did a little, it would mean a lot.

Swap Shops

The Nu. Wardrobe is an Irish female-led startup company focusing on dramatically reducing fashion waste by encouraging the swapping or renting of clothes. Their tag-line is 'Look Good. Save Money. Reduce Waste.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@thenuwardrobe) on

Right on, gals. Extending the life cycle of clothes is hugely important in the fight against fast fashion.

Why not borrow an outfit from a friend or sibling instead of buying something entirely new when you probably don't need to?

Of course, it's important to treat yourself every now and again, and we all need new threads every once and a while when our body sizes change etc, but just remember to ask yourself every time: Do I really need this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

Charity shopping/Vintage outlets

Dun Laoghaire's main street contains some great charity shops like Bernardos, Oxfam, Age Action, Goodwill and more.

George's Street in the city centre also have a great selection of charity shops with the proceeds going to St. Vincent de Paul, Oxfam and Enable Ireland.

The array of vintage shops in Dublin is not to be understated. Head to Dublin Vintage Factory (there are two shops) in Temple Bar for the cheapest but best selection of vintage clothing.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Vintage Factory (@dublinvintagefactory) on

Vintage has emerged onto the scene even more in recent years, and has undoubtedly become one of the biggest trends in Dublin fashion.

Why not buy something no one else could possibly have? Pre-owned and pre-loved.

Other options include; Tola Vintage, Nine Crows, Lucy's Lounge, Monto, The Harlequin, Folkster, Tahiti Vintage, Om Diva, The Cat's Meow, Siopaella and Retro in George's Street Arcade and Temple Bar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tola Vintage Reworked (@tolavintagereworked) on

Apps: Depop/Good On You

Depop has become our addiction in recent months. The app is a clothes-selling platform, basically a digital swap shop, and the range of fashion styles involved is incredible.

Shipping from all over the world, the items are totally unique. You'll see some amazing style trends as well, and the app allows you to refine your searches for uber specific items and brands.

From vintage sportswear brands to quirky 1990s-era fashion pieces, don't miss out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Depop (@depop) on

It's a great feeling knowing that you aren't buying brand new clothes all the time, and the app allows you to make some $ cash dollah $ by selling all of the clothes you haven't worn since your teenage disco days.

We first heard about Good On You from none other than Emma Watson. If she models and endorses them, they have to be sheer excellence.

The app allows you to inform yourself all about the workers rights and sustainability of your favourite brands.

They offer great suggestions for ethical and sustainable brands too, and it's practical and easy to use.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Our favourite ethical/sustainable brands

Finding sustainable clothing for an affordable price can be challenging in Ireland, mainly because of shipping charges.

It's a huge comfort to know that you're paying for clothing made by people who have workers rights, and that they are high-quality. Here are some of our all-time fave brands:

Reformation

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reformation (@reformation) on

Weekday

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@weekdayofficial) on

People Tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@peopletreeuk) on

Oxfam

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Oxfam Ireland (@oxfamireland) on

Thought

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Thought (@thoughtclothing) on

Fame and Partners

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fame and Partners (@fameandpartners) on

Ilk + Ernie

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ilkandernie) on

Ninety Percent

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ninety Percent (@ninety_percent) on

Other gorgeous favourites include: Base Range, Etica, Everlane, Uniqlo, Exhibit, Komodo, Patagonia, Athleta, Petra Von Kant, Lara Intimates, Mayamiko, Thoreau, Boyish and ASOS Made in Kenya

Last but not least, we recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, it pulls back the curtain on fast fashion and the developing world. It's time to wear your values.

Feature image:  Instagram/@cheriebirkner/@sustainablefashionmatterz

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We already know how to shop online, (hell, we do it nearly everyday), but what about selling online?

Sites such as eBay and Depop are great for selling your unwanted clothes, but sometimes no matter how hard you try, that jumper or those jeans just won't sell. 

So, here are some tips and tricks for selling clothes online, and how to make the most bang for your buck:

1. Look after your items

You have to make sure to protect your leathers and suedes, stuff unused bags with paper so they keep their shape and try to keep shoes in their boxes – this way you will be able to charge a higher price. 

 

2. Keep proof

For some items you will need to keep proof of purchase. Knowing where and when you bought the product and what season it came from will ensure a quick sale. Also keeping authenticity cards will help you out big time for designer goods. 

 

3. Be aware of time

The best time to sell a piece is usually three to four seasons after it was first released, but if it was an investment/designer piece, holding onto it for a while could increase its value. 

 

4. Take CLEAR pictures

There's no point taking a photo of a jacket in a dark room or with a bad camera. If the buyer can't see the full piece, they will pass on it. Instead make sure your room is well lit and show as many details of the piece as you can. Also note these things in the description; fabric, pockets, zips, etc. 

 

5. Know the facts

Give exact measurements of the garment and set a fair price for it too. The price will depend on the season it was sold, the condition it's in and if it sold out. Depending on the piece, sell for around 40 to 70 percent of the retail price. 

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