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From spaghetti strap crops and tiny coloured sunglasses to ankle bracelets, velvet headbands, butterfly hair clips and scrunchies; the 1990s were the days when fashion was born and bred.

Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake were dating, Charmed, Friends and Sabrina the Teenage Witch were on our screens and Mary-Kate and Ashley launched their careers. Times were good.

What was one of the many gifts the Olsen Twins gave us? Hair bandanas, of course. In paisley print, to be precise.

olsen twins GIF

The bandana is officially the nostalgic hair accessory making a major comeback this summer, and we're rejoicing from the throwback heavens.

Back in 1999, the world and it's mother was donning headscarves from Christina Aguilera to Dionne in Clueless. The paisley print was where it was AT.

Fast forward a couple of years, and the accessory has been spotted on the high street once more. Vintage stores are also stocking up on the style staple.

Image: Instagram/@pettyclueless

Brands and designers from JW Anderson, Kate Spade and Max Mara are using scarves for their bold catwalk looks, with signature printed ensembles and monogramming included for SS19

One perfect reason for sporting the look is that it can cover up a dodgy hair day, or unwashed hair with enough grease to cook a double cheeseburger. Unwashed tresses are concealed with ease.

Fold your square scarf diagonally in half to create a triangle, place it over your hair and tie at the nape of your neck. Fix with some bobby pins or hair clips to secure it all day, and voila. You're fierce.

Image: Instagram/@thelegendaaliyah

You can even wear the scarves as a crop top if you tie it correctly at the back, which blew our minds. An accessory and an item of clothing which embodies a past era of our lives? Sign us up.

Bad Gal RiRi even used one for her Wild Thoughts music video, looking out of this world incredible as always. We all know that anything Rihanna touches turns to gold, so it's time we joined the trend.

Image: YouTube/Wild Thoughts

The humble headscarf bandana wasn't just graced on the heads of 1990s royalty like Lauren Graham from Gilmore Girls. Male celebrities like Justin Timberlake and Tupac even wore the edgy accessory.

While some of the trends from the nineties have earned their spot on the World Dressed lists nowadays, we simply must throw our support in for the bandana kerchief. It's both lazy and hip at the same time.

If you need us, we'll be hunting Temple Bar's vintage shops for more old-school baggy sportswear, coloured hair clips and tiny sunnies for festival season. Wear your bandana with pride, ladies and gents.

the office bandana GIF

Feature image: Instagram/@marykateandashley_br

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Festival fashion is one of the most sought-after gems in the style calendar, but trends have most definitely shifted in 2019 into a more sustainable environment. Rightfully so.

Rather than buying entirely new wardrobes for each music festival attended, the rise of the rental is upon us as well as the overwhelming popularity of vintage clothes.

The billion-dollar festival fashion scene is a whole new ball game since the rise of apps like Instagram, capturing celebrity fashion at Coachella, Reading, Parklife, Electric Picnic and Glastonbury. 

A fast fashion extravaganza has been the result, with millions of euros spent on clothing for festival wear each year. The fashion industry is the second-biggest water polluter on earth, after the oil industry.

Outlandish, aesthetically-dramatic outfits which normally wouldn't be worn are donned, but with the rise of ethical and sustainable fashion, what are this year's trends? 

Vintage styles are setting the trend agenda this festival season, as shown by global fashion search engine Lyst.

The company identified the major trends for festival season by gathering analysis on the shopping behaviours of over five million people based on social media metrics and search data.

It discovered that the 1990s are well and truly the decade to be apart of. Search results for staples from the time such as neon, bucket hats, tie-dye, chunky sports sandals and graphic t-shirts have all increased.

“Sustainability is an issue that more and more customers care about on Lyst,” the organisation's insights reporter, Morane Le Caer, told The Independent.

1. Biodegradable glitter

Some festivals have already taken action when it comes to the harmful effects of glitter on the environment by pledging to ban glitter from their sites as part of a wider outlaw on single-use plastics.

In case you aren't aware, glitter contains micro-plastics which take hundreds of years to break down, so can cause a phenomenal amount of damage (despite it's small size).

However, you simply can't remove glitter from the festival landscape so a solution has been created; biodegradable glitter. 

Penneys P.S…Festival collection, prices from €2.50 upwards

As it turns out, you can be savvy about the environment while dancing the night away in a field simultaneously.

There are a huge amount of fantastic brands emerging which promote sustainability and recyclable materials, but our faves include;

EcoStardust, Dolls Kill 'Go Get Glitter', In Your Dreams, Festival Face, Primark P.S…Festival collection, BOD Mermaid Body and Eco Glitter Fun.

2. Tiny '90s sunglasses

With the coming of summer brings iconic vintage trends, predominantly from the nineties this year. What was one of the greatest aspects of that era? Tiny sunglasses, of course.

Style icons like Rihanna, Bella Hadid and Selena Gomez have caught on to the trend, which was based around cinematic veterans from the 90s sporting small sunnies in films like Notting Hill (Julia Roberts) and supermodels like Kate Moss.

Are you even a fashionista if you aren't wearing teeny, tiny sunglasses? Probably not. If Kendall Jenner is copying 1999 Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Britney Spears, then you should probably try it too.

You can normally find the best pairs by thrift shopping or visiting places like Dublin Vintage Factory or Nine Crows vintage, but ASOS and ASOS Marketplace also do great coloured oval sunglasses.

3. Sequins

Sequins as a festival trend will most likely never change.

It's the perfect way to grab the spotlight from the artists and firmly place it on yourself, and it's distracting in all the best ways if you haven't washed your hair at Electric Picnic in three days.

Vintage shopping for sequins is one of the most fun activities in the land, and you can find some sparkly gems in most places.

ASOS Marketplace has an extensive selection, and we can't get enough of the co-ords.

All that glitters may not quite be gold, but they can give you a killer look for the next music festival you attend with your gal-pals.

Fashion will always have an obsession with sparkle, with major couture designers utilising sequins with precision. It trickles down to the festivals, where everyone wants to have the most eye-catching apparel.

4. Attention-grabbing hats

From '90s bucket hats and cowboy hats to sequinned military-style caps and printed beanies, when you're having a festival hair day with unwashed tresses; hats will be thy saviour.

Black leather baker boy hats have been spotted on the Nine Crows website, and ASOS Marketplace has an array of velvet and sequinned berets to get your hands on.

Depop is also your best friend when it comes to items like these. The clothes-selling app has millions of users, and is a brilliant place to buy and sell second-hand clothes and vintage goodies.

Somehow, summer always grabs onto the trend of bucket hats every single year. We've seen countless boys at Longitude (RIP) sporting branded Kangol bucket hats, but the vintage headgear remain cool.

While fast fashion brands will bring out their own lines of bucket hats and eye-catching caps, there's nowhere better than vintage stores to get the original '90s vibe.

Temple Bar has numerous shops to rifle through, but some are better for accessories than others. Online stores like Beyond Retro in the UK have a great collection too, and Depop sellers have gorgeous options.

5. Sportswear (cycling shorts, chunky sandals, windbreakers)

The Kardashians and Kanye West are partially credited with reigniting the luxe sportswear trend, and the nineties 'athleisure' fad is officially back.

Sportswear that doubles up as festival wear is definitely on the rise, with cycling shorts and chunky runners seen on high-fashion runways and in high street stores alike.

We're fairly sure the Tour de France wasn't intending on beginning a cycling shorts trend, but here we are.

It's got nothing to do with exercise or physical performance, but everything to do with looking festival fierce in a flash.

Princess Diana's mid-90s style and Yeezy's obsession with form-fitting athleisure have both caused an influx in people searching for leggings and patterned cycling shorts online.

Labels like Fendi, Dior, Chanel, Nanushka, and Maryam Nassir Zadeh all showcasing stylised riffs on cycling shorts in their runway collections recently, with the addition of neon to prove peak 90s.

Wear with an oversized blazer and statement belt if your shorts aren't eye-catching enough at Electric Picnic.

Patterned all-in-one by Tara Khorzad LDN at ASOS Marketplace, €69.55

With vintage and sustainable shopping on the increase, nailing these five festival fashion trends in the 2019 season will be easier, and cheaper, than ever but with a less negative environmental impact.

You don't need an entirely new wardrobe to slay the styles. It just takes some dedication and creativity, and the knowledge of the best second-hand places to shop.

Do yourself a favour and download Depop while you're at it. The '90s will be all over your campsite aesthetic in no time.

black and white 90s GIF

Feature image: Purple lens sunnies by Vintings at ASOS Marketplace, €11.76

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Aim to sustain is our new motto, given the current climate emergency.

We're pure delighted that ASOS Marketplace exists purely for the purpose of bringing you the hottest vintage, charity and independent store boutiques in the business.

Tracking down the best fashion pieces that are vintage or sustainable online can be a tricky challenge, but we've chosen our top 10 from the website for you. 

1. Just Harry on ASOS Marketplace: patchwork recycled denim dungarees, €171.60

ASOS Marketplace/@just harry 

2. Em's the Label at ASOS Marketplace: festival boob tube in patchwork, €20.80

ASOS Marketplace/@em's the label

3. Levi's on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 80s Levi's Reworked Pocket Mom Jeans Light Wash/0217, €37.43

ASOS Marketplace/@levi's

4. Braderie on ASOS Marketplace: Reworked vintage floral two-piece set, €24.96

ASOS Marketplace/@braderie

5. Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 90s platinum blazer jacket, €50.96

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

6. Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace, 90s gold chunky chain with diamante star pendant, €20.80

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

7. Dark Paradise Vintage at ASOS Marketplace, vintage 90s Y2K metallic purple backless dress, €46.80

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

8. 2Point5D at ASOS Marketplace, Reworked kitsch yellow brick road Wizard of Oz jacket, €72.80

ASOS Marketplace/@2Point5D

9. Sisterhood at ASOS Marketplace, midi slip dress in gold, €67.60

ASOS Marketplace/@sisterhood

10. Sisterhood at ASOS Marketplace, 100% sustainable cotton floral dress, €67.60

ASOS Marketplace/@sisterhood

11.  Dark Paradise Vintage on ASOS Marketplace: Vintage 90s clear PVC chunky handbag, €40.56

ASOS Marketplace/@darkparadisevintage

Work those fierce looks all day long, safe in the knowledge that you haven't caused any more harm to the environment by contributing to the textiles industry.

Definitely try to check whether or not these storefront boutiques online package their goods in biodegradable materials as well, if you can. Sustainably slay all day.

ken doll flirting GIF

Feature image: Dark Paradise Vintage/ASOS Marketplace 

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Depop is one of the greatest tools in your arsenal when it comes to buying and selling items of clothing.

The legendary buy-and-sell app is getting increasingly popular by the day, especially with the rise of sustainable fashion and ethical shopping.

Buying pre-owned and pre-loved styles will hopefully keep on rising in popularity, otherwise the planet may just burn to shreds at an even faster rate (not even joking!?).

Depop has many lovable traits. The search bar allows you to find gorgeous vintage pieces within Ireland for an incredibly affordable price, and you can also extend your search party worldwide if you're willing to pay for shipping costs.

A seller can also make a pretty penny from selling your old clothes that you NEVER wear anymore (we've sold about 34 dresses we haven't even seen since our Wezz days for a great profit).

The explore page when you first enter the app also has top picks based on your likes and preferences, and also the Depop app's own favourite shops they've got their eye on. 

Beverly Hills 90210 Fashion GIF by CBS All Access

Without further fashion ado, here are our Depop top picks for today. Nab them before they're sold:

1. Vintage deadstock 1990s flare jeans
    Size 6, Price: £30 (€32)

Image: Depop/@lochrian

2. Vintage pink pastel mini-dress  
    Size 10, Price: £39 (€42.55)

Image: Depop/@kaohinani

3. Early 1990s vintage designer mesh dress by Betsey Johnson
    Size XS, Price: £150 (€164)

Image: Depop/@eleanorehly

4. Faux fur cow jacket
    Size 8-10, Price: £50 (€54.60)

Image: Depop/@whatthefluff_

5. Baby blue plaid Nike Air Force 1
    Size: Womens 8.5, Price: $100 (€90)

Image: Depop/@yslej

6. Vintage Jane Norman chainmail shoulder bag
    Price:
 £20 (€21.80)

Image: Depop/@hazzledazzled

7. Vintage Karen Millen baby pink suit
    UK size 8, Price: £45 (€49)

Image: Depop/@shannoncastro

8. Vintage patchwork frayed denim jeans
    Size UK 10, Price: £95 (€103.60)

 

Image: Depop/@siandrakard

 9. Upcycled linen Topshop midi dress
     Size: UK 12, Price: £27.50 (€30)

Depop/@wildergren

10. Hippy style Miss Sixty flare jeans
      Size: UK 8-10, Price: £110 (€120)

Depop/@eviehallows

11. Rare 1980s vintage Adidas originals sweatshirt in purple and turquoise
      Size: M, Price: £75 (€81)

Depop/@james27west

12. Vintage Richards bolt blouse with stunning button details
      Size: 8-10, Price: £35 (€37.90)

Depop/@maidmessy

Shop to your heart's content knowing that you aren't causing damage to the environment by adding to the textiles industry, it's a good feeling.

Feature image: Instagram/@depop

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Just over one month ago, veteran vintage brand Nine Crows launched their very own Thrift Store after the success of their pop-ups, and it's a beautiful sight to behold.

Pre-loved threads, charity shopping and vintage looks have all become the pinnacle of fashion ever since awareness has spread about the textile industry's shocking lack of sustainability.

With fast fashion as big an issue as ever, and tonnes of clothes constantly being sent to landfill, brands like Nine Crows are incredibly important.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@ninecrowsthriftshop) on

Nine Crows held warehouse clearance sales throughout the summer, finally opening up the brilliant thrift store on June 8 of this year.

They're a small, independently-owned company who contribute to a sustainable lifestyle, and they're proud of it. Making ethical fashion more accessible and sustainable is their goal, and we love them for it.

Their Nine Crows vintage store is home to special, high-quality and one-of-a-kind pieces, which their buying team sort through tens of thousands of items to find. Locating gems ain't an easy job.

The prices are significantly higher in their vintage store, as the clothing is curated and features rare pieces, but their thrift store is a whole different story.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ninecrowsthriftshop) on

For their thrift store, Nine Crows choose the type of clothing they want and purchase it in bulk. Second-hand clothes bought in this manner isn't curated, and you as the customer gets to do all the fun rummaging (fummaging?).

It's a mystery, but you find some amazing hidden pieces and reap the rewards with the cheap prices. The Nine Crows Thrift Store is located in their warehouse, off Baggot Street at 12 Pembroke Row.

The shop is open Thursdays to Sundays, from 12pm to 6pm and is WELL worth a sneaky peek. Everything is between €5 and €15, so you can't use prices as an excuse to shop fast fashion brands.

We're sprinting there as we type:

the goldbergs television GIF

Nine Crows currently have a competition running which gives you the chance to win a €100 gift voucher for their thrift store, so enter on their Instagram page here.

Feature image: Instagram/@ninecrowsthriftshop

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With all the conversations regarding the decrepit state of our planet, it's no surprise that the terms 'ethical fashion' and 'sustainable clothing' are coming up again and again.

Whether it's the depressing lack of labour rights which garment workers possess, or the untold amount of damage a simple white t-shirt can do to the earth; it's time to get serious about the disastrous environmental impact of fashion.

Fact Attack

1. The truth of the matter is: the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, second only to the oil industry.

Unfortunately, developing countries are constantly the ones to suffer from developed nations and their materialistic consumerist culture. While high street shops have lower pricing, it's important to ask ourselves why this is so.

Normally, it's because the cost of production is incredibly cheap, and the workers aren't being paid in equity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Patagonia Dublin (@patagoniadublin) on

For example, according to Stephen Leahy of The Guardian, 100 million people in India don't have access to drinking water. However, 85 percent of the daily needs of the entire population of India would be provided by the water used to grow the country's cotton.

The same cotton that goes into making our clothes, the clothes of people who have always had access to daily needs like drinking water. So the question is, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Fast fashion is a hugely feminist issue seeing as women in these underdeveloped countries are paid less than men for working in these garment factories.

The number of workplace injuries and deaths in factories in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and Cambodia are still shockingly high.

Now, this article isn't intended to guilt or shame anyone. It's just a wake-up call, and knowing the facts of this vital topic can lead to change. Change can lead to less harm on the planet, and isn't that always a good thing?

2. First of all, it's important to know that the untreated toxic waste-waters from textile factories are often dumped directly into the rivers of countries where clothes are made.

These waste-waters contain toxic substances like arsenic, mercury and lead, which kill the aquatic life and health of millions living by that same river. Contamination reaches the sea and spreads globally.

The use of fertilizers for cotton production heavily pollute waters, another danger of creating just a single item of clothing for brands we all know and buy from. 

Image: Catch News

3. Clothing in our culture has become disposable, and more and more textile waste is accumulating as a result. According to Elizabeth Cline of The Atlantic, a family in the 'western world' throws away an average of 30kg of clothing every year.

4. Only 15 percent of this is recycled or donated, and what happens to the rest? Landfill or incineration.

What's worse, synthetic fibres like polyester are plastic fibres, and can take up to 200 years to decompose.

Global textiles production emits 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases every single year. That's more than international flights and maritime shipping put together, according to Fashion Revolution.

5. These biodegradable synthetic fibres are used in a shocking 72 percent of our clothing. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

6. The UK population has £10.5 billion worth of unworn clothes in their closet, according to recent research. It's massively valuable to donate your unworn clothes rather than throw them away. Every item of apparel has a history, and can tell a story.

Fast fashion is having an unparalleled influence on the planet, with more and more clothes being incinerated into the air every year.

Workers are suffering in poverty to make our clothes, and we have no idea who they even are. We have a responsibility to bring ethics into what we wear and how we style ourselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ethical & Sustainable Fashion (@thekindguide) on

The issue may seem far away, but we can't ignore the problem any longer.

Clothing is a basic human need, give someone else the chance to wear the clothes you don't want anymore.

6. The apparel industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions, because our clothes are made in countries which power their factories with coal.

This means our synthetic fibres are basically made from fossil fuel, hence why it's so important to buy clothes with natural fibres.

Image: Remake

Here's our survival guide for ethical shopping and sustainable fashion, but remember: Nobody's perfect.

Even if you reduce your buying habits a tiny bit, or change one of your high street shops to an ethical brand, that's great. Just do your best; if everyone did a little, it would mean a lot.

Swap Shops

The Nu. Wardrobe is an Irish female-led startup company focusing on dramatically reducing fashion waste by encouraging the swapping or renting of clothes. Their tag-line is 'Look Good. Save Money. Reduce Waste.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@thenuwardrobe) on

Right on, gals. Extending the life cycle of clothes is hugely important in the fight against fast fashion.

Why not borrow an outfit from a friend or sibling instead of buying something entirely new when you probably don't need to?

Of course, it's important to treat yourself every now and again, and we all need new threads every once and a while when our body sizes change etc, but just remember to ask yourself every time: Do I really need this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

Charity shopping/Vintage outlets

Dun Laoghaire's main street contains some great charity shops like Bernardos, Oxfam, Age Action, Goodwill and more.

George's Street in the city centre also have a great selection of charity shops with the proceeds going to St. Vincent de Paul, Oxfam and Enable Ireland.

The array of vintage shops in Dublin is not to be understated. Head to Dublin Vintage Factory (there are two shops) in Temple Bar for the cheapest but best selection of vintage clothing.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Vintage Factory (@dublinvintagefactory) on

Vintage has emerged onto the scene even more in recent years, and has undoubtedly become one of the biggest trends in Dublin fashion.

Why not buy something no one else could possibly have? Pre-owned and pre-loved.

Other options include; Tola Vintage, Nine Crows, Lucy's Lounge, Monto, The Harlequin, Folkster, Tahiti Vintage, Om Diva, The Cat's Meow, Siopaella and Retro in George's Street Arcade and Temple Bar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tola Vintage Reworked (@tolavintagereworked) on

Apps: Depop/Good On You

Depop has become our addiction in recent months. The app is a clothes-selling platform, basically a digital swap shop, and the range of fashion styles involved is incredible.

Shipping from all over the world, the items are totally unique. You'll see some amazing style trends as well, and the app allows you to refine your searches for uber specific items and brands.

From vintage sportswear brands to quirky 1990s-era fashion pieces, don't miss out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Depop (@depop) on

It's a great feeling knowing that you aren't buying brand new clothes all the time, and the app allows you to make some $ cash dollah $ by selling all of the clothes you haven't worn since your teenage disco days.

We first heard about Good On You from none other than Emma Watson. If she models and endorses them, they have to be sheer excellence.

The app allows you to inform yourself all about the workers rights and sustainability of your favourite brands.

They offer great suggestions for ethical and sustainable brands too, and it's practical and easy to use.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Our favourite ethical/sustainable brands

Finding sustainable clothing for an affordable price can be challenging in Ireland, mainly because of shipping charges.

It's a huge comfort to know that you're paying for clothing made by people who have workers rights, and that they are high-quality. Here are some of our all-time fave brands:

Reformation

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reformation (@reformation) on

Weekday

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@weekdayofficial) on

People Tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@peopletreeuk) on

Oxfam

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Oxfam Ireland (@oxfamireland) on

Thought

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Thought (@thoughtclothing) on

Fame and Partners

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fame and Partners (@fameandpartners) on

Ilk + Ernie

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ilkandernie) on

Ninety Percent

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ninety Percent (@ninety_percent) on

Other gorgeous favourites include: Base Range, Etica, Everlane, Uniqlo, Exhibit, Komodo, Patagonia, Athleta, Petra Von Kant, Lara Intimates, Mayamiko, Thoreau, Boyish and ASOS Made in Kenya

Last but not least, we recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, it pulls back the curtain on fast fashion and the developing world. It's time to wear your values.

Feature image:  Instagram/@cheriebirkner/@sustainablefashionmatterz

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The A/W 18 Collection for Thomas Sabo has landed and it is truly breathtaking – think iconic, vintage styles that are timeless. 

The Sterling Silver celebrates the art of mismatching – it creates a strong and authentic aesthetic for the wearer. Sounds fabulous, right?

It can't be argued that Thomas Sabo is redefining what classic jewellery means. 

 Rose Gold Vintage ring

Brand heritage is woven deep into this new collection, featuring a collection called the Spirit Moonphase Movement 1984 which represents the creation of the THOMAS SABO brand. 

In addition to that, there is the stunning Kingdom Of Dreams collection, which is geared towards the expressive wearer.

Finally, there is a collection of creative rings, chains and medallions for everyone to wear.

Yellow Gold Crown Kingdom Of Dreams ring

A boho or vintage lover? Then the retro styles will be right up your street! 

Every piece of jewellery has a special vintage touch – the rings are decorated with fine diamonds, and the medallions radiate with nostalgia as they have space inside to pop a picture of a loved one – how cute!

In keeping with this theme, even the watches have been slimmed down, with the Mini Vintage watches being inspired by art deco styles of bygone eras.

This absolutely beautiful collection is available from the end of July online and across THOMAS SABO counters in Ireland.

We for one will be draping ourself in these jewels, what about you? 

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Flaking paint, worn out words, a faded storefront. You've passed countless signs like this on the street – possibly you've walked on by, unnoticing, or maybe they made you stop and wonder 'What used to be here?'

These vestiges of the city's distant (and not-so-distant) past are known as ghost signs.

They usually come in the form of advertising, often painted on the brick sides of buildings, but are also manifested in carved signs and other adornments. The signs are sometimes for businesses that are still extant but have just left those particular premises.

Once you start spotting these reminders of Dublin's history, it's hard to stop. I was first introduced to ghost signs by my Economic Policy and Business History lecturer, Professor Frank Barry, in my final year of college. 

We were tasked with walking around the city, heads tilted up to look for ghost signs that were hiding in plain sight.

I was astounded by the number I discovered and found myself happy to wander around city centre for hours on end, trying not to bump into people as I kept my eyes peeled for ghost signs.

But why was I so fascinated from the start? Why is it one of the parts of my final year curriculum I remember best, despite the ghost sign project's minimal contribution to my grade?

"Funnily enough, visually, ghost signs seem to fit in with a particular aesthetic that's in vogue at the moment, that vaguely vintage combination of exposed brick, subway tiles and recycled pallets," observed Antonia Hart, the author of Ghost Signs of Dublin.

She said she's even seen mock-ups of ghost signs around town to fit that old-fashioned look that's so popular with certain Instagrammers.

"I've seen a fake ghost sign painted on a brick wall inside a cafe, and there's one in Pearse Station (Cadburys) which isn't real either, it's a remnant of a film," the writer and researcher noted.

Emma Clarke, who runs the popular blog dublinghostsigns.com, says the reason these echoes of the past prove so interesting to us is that they also tug at our heartstrings.

"I think people feel a mixture of curiosity and nostalgia when they see these old signs," she stated, "Ghost signs and vintage shopfronts often make people think about the people who owned or worked for the businesses in the past." 

Indeed, in a time when rose-coloured glasses are practically everyday eyewear, it makes sense we'd be drawn to these harbingers of history.

"The signs are remnants of a different time – when there were brushmakers, victuallers and dairies around the city – a real contrast to today's convenience stores and fast food outlets," Emma reflected.

The Dublin Ghost Signs Instagram account is brimming with hundreds of posts, and it's an easy rabbit hole to fall into – as is the world of ghost signs in general. 

Some history buffs, like Frank, are so deep into it that they walk through the Dublin of the past, rather than the present. These ghost signs are their landmarks.

"I often say to people, and they think I’m crazy, but when I walk the city streets, I don’t see the modern world at all," he says, "I’m walking through the Dublin of the 1950s or the 1930s or the 1890s because that’s the world that’s all around me that I care about and that I notice."

Frank's interest in ghost signs comes from his boyhood days, looking for old coins, and later on when he noticed simple indicators of a city's commercial past. 

One prime example is the half door, also known as a stable door, which is split into a bottom and top half to keep animals either in or out – a sign of a society that relies on animal husbandry. He noticed them while travelling in Mexico about three decades ago, and quickly thought of the doors back in his father's hometown of Mallow, Co Cork.

All those half doors were gone from Mallow by the time he'd returned from his years abroad. There remained some hope, though – there was a half door on the street in Dublin he used to walk down every day to go to school.

"I went by it six months ago and it was still there," Frank recalled.

Because he didn't have a phone or a camera on him, he couldn't capture this small reminder of Dublin's history at the time.

He returned a few weeks to take a photo of the door, but it had disappeared. And it's not the only remnant of old Dublin that's vanished overnight.

The city is changing rapidly, and as many are saying (though with different tones depending on who you're talking to), the boom times are back. Cranes are scraping clouds all across the skyline, and ghost signs are under threat.

To Frank, this is a great loss.

"Well, I think it’s tragic," he said, "I suppose the world is divided between the people who want to preserve everything and the people who want to demolish everything."

He has some hope, though, saying, "Fortunately, I think there’s much greater awareness now of the value of things like ghost signs. I think architects in particular… would be interested in preserving remnants of history."

Emma sees the integration of ghost signs into current businesses as a way of honouring Dublin's past while still moving forward.

"Sometimes during a renovation or refurbishment, an old sign or shopfront is uncovered and the owners decide to incorporate aspects of the old business into the new design," she explained. 

"It is great when some link to a building's past is retained, but of course, it's not always possible and cities have to move on."

She points to one example on Capel Street to illustrate her point. Walsh's used to operate out of 159 Capel Street, where Klaw now dishes out seafood. The new occupants have paid tribute to Walsh's by mounting its sign inside the restaurant as decoration.

Antonia has a similar mindset to Emma, saying, "The city has to be dynamic, and you can't keep everything just because it's old. But it would be nice if as little destruction as possible took place – if you could layer a new sign over the old rather than ripping it out." 

"But that won't always be possible," she admitted, "At the very least, it takes three seconds to photograph the sign for posterity."

That's why books like Antonia's, blogs like Emma's, and assignments like Frank's prove so very important. Ghost signs may disappear, but the work of these historically-minded heroes preserve what they can.

I hope the next time you're in city centre you look beyond modern Dublin, into the past that still peeks through.

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The weather outside may say otherwise, but summer 2018 is FINALLY in sight – and with that, it's high time we give our wardrobes a bit of a style makeover. 

Sure, you could nip into town and fill you shopping bags with the high street's latest collections, but if you're on the hunt for unique finds and vintage threads, look no further than ASOS Marketplace. 

Home to the best independent brands and boutiques, the online store is a vintage lover's dream. 

From gorgeous accessories to colourful kimonos, here's just some of our favourite pieces available to buy right now. 

Bag strass multicolor // amandalovesvintage // €37.67
RARE 80s vintage Givenchy tweed jacket // givenchy // €148.96
Pink Corduroy Oversized Biker Jacket // style by s+s // €22.86
Vintage 90's Patchwork Dungaree Dress // €22.86
Vintage Inspired White and Gold Cat Eye Sunglasses // style by s+s // €13.75
Floral and Tile Printed Kimono Kaftan Cardigan // exceptional london // €22.90 
Light Grey "Habana" Sweatshirt // kaotiko // €51.45
Vintage 80s Levi's Mom Jeans RAW DENIM / 0001 // levi's // €41.24
Vintage 80s Tan Brown Suede Long Jacket // €63.02
Ring a Roses Print Co-ordinates // yapyap // €45.83
Vintage Floral High Waisted Denim Cut Off Shorts // levi's // €32.08
Chinese Paisley Crop Trousers // yapyap // €33.23

 

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Who else remembers the pure excitement of popping that beloved, worn out Disney video in the VCR? 

You prayed the video wouldn't get eaten by the dusty machine as your favourite scenes were rewound over and over.

If you were one Disney fan who happened to keep every early variation of the movies – on either VHS or DVD – it turns out that your no-doubt prized collection could be worth a fairly tidy sum.

 

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There really is a serious market for Disney nostalgia on the likes of sites like Ebay and Esty, with certain collections fetching thousands online.

Both the DVDs and VHS videos could give your daily earnings more than a little top-up but going by some of the collections for sale, the most valuable seems to the Black Diamond VHS Collection.

This rare collection includes 18 animated features all released between 1988 to 1993 for VHS. These editions come in a clamshell case and display a logo in the shape of a black diamond that says 'The Classics' on the spine, according to Stylist

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Over on Etsy, a set of 21 pre-owned vintage Disney VHS tapes (including one Black Diamond edition) is selling for an astounding £182,294.74.

Full sets will usually always be snapped up by specialist collectors but you can get lucky if you even own singular videos; a root around on Ebay and you'll see some range from in the sixties to the hundreds, according to The Mirror

Would you dust yours off if you were cash-strapped before payday? 

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Before this month, you could only rifle through the unique vintage finds curated by Public Romance by visiting the eclectic store on Galway's Abbeygate Street. 

Now, the vintage store has made its way into the 21st century by moving from bricks and mortar to online.

Now vintage lovers across the country can shop the unique stock from the comfort of their own homes. 

 

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Public Romance is bringing it's brand manifesto with it into the online sphere, offering two different shopping experiences.

'Public Romance offers two unique fashion retail experiences: on the ground floor, a selection of contemporary independent clothing and accessories for women are available, all of which are exclusive to Galway,' reads the PR website

'On the upper floor, Public Romance offers men’s and women's trend-orientated vintage clothing, dating from the 1960's to the 1990's – original Adidas pieces, classic streetwear, customised vintage Levi’s, military, festival outfits, and much more. '

 

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Both of these individual shopping experiences will be available to online users. 

Whether you're from Galway but miss being able to shop in your local vintage store, or are from across Ireland looking for somewhere new to swap your cash for one-off clothing, we recommend you check it out. 

And just in time for party season too. 

 

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Panicking about what to wear tonight? 

Never fear, town is usually a mere bus route away, so here's a few bits that are in stores at the moment to rescue your night out ensemble. 

Left to right: Zara dress €25.95

Zara T-shirt €9.95

Zara denim skirt €29.95

Zara jumpsuit €39.95

Left to right: Topshop playsuit €40.00

Topshop crop top €20.00

Topshop bandeau shirt €34.00

Topshop denim skirt €46.00

Left to right: New Look top €24.99

New Look bralette €19.99

New Look biker jacket €49.99

New Look heels €39.99

Left to right: River Island bodysuit €35.00

River Island Choker €17.00

River Island skirt €33.00

River Island crop top €35.00

Left to right: Penneys gingham top €11.00

Penneys bodysuit €10.00

Penneys pink top €13.00

Penneys denim jacket €23.00

Left to right: Nine crows deep V shirt €32.00

Nine Crows white fishnet top €32.00

Nine Crows halter top €25.00

Nine Crows vintage dress €35.00

Feature image: Nine Crows Vintage 

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