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Sustainable fashion is on the rise, and with it comes the excitement of buying pre-loved vintage items and designer goods for a fraction of their original price. 

If you're like us, and are gagging to update your wardrobe with high-quality, classic designer pieces for good value for money, we have the exact store for you.

With the fashion industry being the world’s second-largest polluter, just after oil, our shopping habits desperately need to change. Fashion has impact, that's for sure. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Wardrobe Kilkenny is a designer consignment store which stocks everything from designer bags and accessories to complete outfits from high-end labels for an affordable price.

Their business has been promoting sustainable fashion for over 20 years, and they're diligent when it comes to environmental impact. Getting dressed every morning has direct results.

Shockingly, more than 80 billion pieces of clothing are produced worldwide each year. Of these pieces, 75 percent will end up in landfills. The average T-shirt uses 1500 to 2000 litres of water to make.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The fashion industry uses 1600 chemicals in their dyeing processes, and only one per cent of these have been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Scary stats, right?

Shopping pre-loved needs to be a life choice, not just a trend. Buying clothes doesn't have to mean compromising on fashion, style or quality, according to Yvonne Fitzgerald.

Yvonne acts as the proprietor of The Wardrobe Kilkenny, and believes that shopping consignment has numerous incredible benefits. For one, it's eco-friendly. You're keeping garments out of landfill.

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

Another perk is that you can find unique items with a treasure hunt-type shopping experience. The thrill of the hunt is undeniable.

The same brands come at a lower price, it's like a permanent sale.

The Wardrobe Kilkenny stock pre-loved labels such as Chanel, Prada, Gucci, Brunello Cuccinelli, Bulgari, Dolce and Gabbana, Pucci, Alexander McQueen, Diane Von Furstenberg, Louis Vuitton and many more.  

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

Even if you don't head down to buy something, you can sell your own designer goods for a pretty penny.

Companies like Depop are essentially doing the same thing, whereby you can run your own online shop and buy and sell items over the brilliant app.

When you have gently-used, unique or highly-coveted items that you don't use, why not sell them? Give someone else the chance to love your belongings.

Image: The Wardrobe Kilkenny

The Wardrobe Kilkenny believe in the lifecycle of luxury goods and are always looking for designer items to sell on your behalf.

To get in touch call 056 771 5542 or visit the store at 29 Patrick Street.

Between now and August 31, if you mention SHEmazing when you consign your piece you can receive 15 percent off your first purchase. The bargains simply go on and on. Enjoy the couture, ladies.

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Alongside Prada and Gucci's blackface scandals, major fashion brands have recently come under fire for making some major PC-related errors.

Burberry is the latest company to be added to this list of elite couture scandals, after their autumn/winter collection at London Fashion Week featured a hoodie with strings resembling a noose.

Yes, you read that right. An actual noose, akin to those used for lynchings or suicides. They really didn't think this one through…and now the model who wore the design down the runway has expressed her horror;

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 (@liz.kennedy_) on

Liz Kennedy, turned to Instagram to illustrate her anger and disturbance after she was fitted wearing the hoodie, as suicide touches a personal nerve for her.

"Suicide is not fashion. It is not glamorous nor edgy and since this show is dedicated to the youth expressing their voice, here I go. Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry: it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway," she wrote.

She stated that the Burberry team "briefly hung one from the ceiling (trying to figure out the knot) and were laughing about it in the dressing room. I had asked to speak to someone about it but the only thing I was told to do was to write a letter."

The brand released an apology statement following a huge wave of backlash after the runway show, and the design is now removed from the new collection.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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According to Fortune, Marco Gobbetti, Burberry chief executive officer, said;

"We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection. I called Ms. Kennedy to apologise as soon as I became aware of this on Monday and we immediately removed the product and all images that featured it."

He continued, "Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake."

The fashion faux pas follows Gucci's debut of a $890 balaclava sweater that evoked blackface images earlier this month.

Liz Kennedy also mentioned the impressionable young women who would see the noose hoodie;

"How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth. The impressionable youth. Not to mention the rising suicide rates world wide. Let’s not forget about the horrifying history of lynching either."

"I left my fitting extremely triggered after seeing this look (even though I did not wear it myself). Feeling as though I was right back where I was when I was going through an experience with suicide in my family," she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 (@liz.kennedy_) on

Kennedy also claims that she attempted to speak to someone about it, but was brushed off;

"I had a brief conversation with someone but all that it entailed was “it’s fashion. Nobody cares about what’s going on in your personal life so just keep it to yourself” well I’m sorry but this is an issue bigger than myself."

"The issue is not about me being upset, there is a bigger picture here of what fashion turns a blind eye to or does to gain publicity. A look so ignorantly put together and a situation so poorly handled. I am ashamed to have been apart of the show. #burberry."

The collection, Tempest, is Riccardo Tisci’s second for the brand. Marco Gobbetti has since called Kennedy to apologise personally and address the situation.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Riccardo Tisci (@riccardotisci17) on

In an updated post, Kennedy wrote;

"My family and I were recently impacted by suicide so I know how devastating it is when someone you love decides to take their life. I’m not someone who is easily offended or triggered but I knew by the way this piece effected me, it would do the same to many others."

She continued, referencing Marco Gobbetti, Burberry's chief executive;

 "Whether people are dealing with suicide, mental illness themselves, or someone close to them facing these issues they can’t be taken lightly. Since my post, Marco called me to address the situation."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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"I think the response by Burberry and their team since then is commendable. I believe this is a learning moment and they will think about these things more in-depth moving forward."

The model bravely spoke out about the incident, and the brand has responded. It just goes to show that fashion isn't completely rigid, and it's valuable to call them out on their mistakes.

"The positive that has come out of this is a reminder of the power of one voice, and the good that can be done when brands are held accountable."

Feature image: Adweek

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TMZ are reporting that Katy Perry is under fire for including designs in her shoe range which resemble blackface.

Her eponymous shoe line, Katy Perry Collections, include two styles; the 'Rue Face Slip-On Loafers' and 'Ora Face Block Heel Sandals'. Both are being pulled from retail shops due to the backlash.

In a statement representing the brand, a spokesperson said; "In order to be respectful and sensitive, the team is in the process of pulling the shoes."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The loafers came in two colours, nude and black, and the high-heeled versions in black and gold. The designs feature blue eyes, bright red lips and a triangular-shaped nose, which has some Twitter users feeling VERY angry.

An image of the shoes was posted to the Roar singer's Instagram last August and there was serious criticism in the comments section.

Numerous fashion brands have come under fire for allegations of blackface, with Prada and Gucci especially receiving negative attention.

Numerous fashion brands have come under fire for allegations of blackface, with Prada and Gucci especially receiving negative attention.

Perry's shoes are currently available at Dillard's and Walmart and cost a whopping $129, but will be removed.

Feature image: Women's Health

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Fashion brand Gucci has been forced to apologise after releasing a balaclava-style jumper which resembles 'blackface', according to the Evening Standard.

The black piece of attire was being sold as part of their Fall/Winter 2018 campaign, and covers the lower half of the face and red mouth cut-out.

The jumper has now been removed from sale, and the brand has issued an apology after facing massive social media backlash for the offensive material.

Their statement was released by a spokesman for the luxury fashion house, saying that they consider diversity a 'fundamental value' of their company and that the incident would be adapted into a 'powerful learning movement';

"Gucci deeply apologises for the offence caused by the wool balaclava jumper. We can confirm that the item has been immediately removed from our online store and all physical stores."

“We consider diversity to be a fundamental value to be fully upheld, respected, and at the forefront of every decision we make. We are fully committed to increasing diversity throughout our organisation and turning this incident into a powerful learning moment for the Gucci team and beyond," it concluded.

The description for Gucci's item originally read; 

“Inspired by vintage ski masks, multi-coloured knitted balaclavas walked the runway, adding a mysterious feel to this collection. This knit top combines the accessory with the ready-to-wear collection.”

Social media users managed to get screenshots of the $890 jumper before it was pulled, ironically noting that it was Black History Month.

One Twitter user wrote; “Haute Couture Blackface for the millennials?”

Gucci's problems with fashion mishaps is the latest incident in a number of racially-charged mistakes by designer fashion brands. 

Prada removed items last month over products which were also concerning for the public.

Feature image: India Today

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We're all most likely familiar with the incredible Marvel film Black Panther.

One of the biggest phenomenon's of 2018, and the highest grossing superhero movie of ALL TIME, the hiring of a nearly all-black cast was a pivotal moment in cinema.

The setting of Wakanda remains one of the most iconic aspects of the film, which mainstream fashion has gripped onto. 

Image: Polygon

The film's acclaimed costume designer Ruth E. Carter wanted to change the public's generalised perception of the African continent;

“I want people to have a new vision of the continent of Africa,” she told Refinery29.

“I want people to understand it's not just this dark place where everyone dresses the same with bones in their nose, living in a grass hut. People need to see this is a modern continent. It has a voice and an aesthetic.” 

Unfortunately, clothing brand Forever21 have released clothing inspired by the film, but have gotten into some hot water when it comes to the models chosen…

Fans of the film are NOT happy to see possibly the palest man in existence modelling merchandise for the infamously diverse movie, but some fans are claiming that the backlash is unfounded.

Forever21 tweeted; "Wakanda Forever, get the sweater here" last night, alongside a photo of a mens' top, named a 'Wakanda Forever Fair Isle Sweater.'

Twitter did it's job, to say the least. The clothing company quickly deleted the tweet, but the image is still on their website.

If you click on the link, it redirects you to another model, this time a diverse one, wearing a yellow and black sweater.

There's nothing wrong with a person of any race enjoying a movie's merchandise of course.

However, many users online were troubled at the perceived whitewashing, considering the film is arguably the first superhero of it's kind to appeal to all races, ages and genders.

Whitewashing has been appearing in fashion more and more recently, with Zara and H+M getting into trouble for missteps in their high street fashion.

Prada found itself getting backlash last week for a shop window display featuring a charm eerily reminiscent of a Blackface character.

We think Forever21 need to be a tad more careful with it's marketing campaigns…

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Mules seem to be the footwear of the season, with everyone from Penneys to Prada selling them.

We totally fell in love with Prada's recent 'Black Suede Slipper' which was launched earlier this summer, and retails for roughly €530.

However, we have found a Topshop dupe that costs a fraction of the price.

 

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And you literally cannot tell the difference.

The Topshop pair come in at €34, so you know… you're basically saving yourself 500 quid.

We think we need to indulge in a bit of shoe shopping…

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In today's world, it's very uncommon for a major brand to not have an Instagram. 

Most designer labels and brands devote huge resources to the social media site, inspiring customers to post to them and about them. 

Of course, some brands IG better than others, but in a new study carried out by M by Macy's we see the surprising outcome of which apparel companies are on top of the #hashtag leader board.

The reports show which brand has the most mentions and followers, as well as the most overall engagement. 

Nike tops both lists, with 47.7m mentions and 18.7m followers. 

Prada ranks in second with mentions (18.7m), but then drops to tenth in followers (4.2m). 

Other surprises include Vans Shoes, which beat Fendi, Burberry and Louis Vuitton in mentions. 

With IG's growing popularity and brands' fluctuating relevance in the industry, we suspect these figures will change. But for now, the ranking is a good indicator of which brands are generating the most interest on social media. 

See the full list of rankings below: 

 

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