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The world of fashion is changing. With the textiles industry named as the second-largest polluter of water (only behind the oil industry), times are progressing when it comes to ethical, eco-friendly clothing.

The new ASOS 'Responsible Edit' function aims to offer a simplistic way to find the most sustainable clothing options on the retailer's website.

From outfits made out of recycled materials and sustainable separates to ethical skincare and cosmetic products; the 'Responsible Edit' is the place to be.

1. Weekday wide leg smock jumpsuit in graphic print at ASOS

Weekday at ASOS
Price: €49.77

2. ASOS DESIGN sweetheart neck tiered midi dress in polka dot

ASOS Design
Price: €52.54

3. Monki v-neck midi dress with button details and polka dot print at ASOS

Monki at ASOS
Price: €55.30

4. Anaya With Love tulle ruffle shoulder bardot maxi dress with satin trim in soft pink at ASOS

Anaya With Love at ASOS
Price: €103.69

5. ASOS DESIGN square neck linen midi sundress with wooden buckle & contrast stitch in squiggle print

ASOS Design
Price: €38.71

6. ASOS DESIGN boiler playsuit with neon stitching

ASOS Design
Price: €62.21

7. Weekday fruit print mid cami dress with front slit in navy at ASOS

Weekday at ASOS
Price: €55.30

8. ASOS DESIGN denim sleeveless fitted mini stretch shirt dress

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

9. ASOS DESIGN recycled V neck strappy plunge swimsuit in washed paisley print

ASOS Design
Price: €28.34

10. ASOS DESIGN bandeau button front jumpsuit with pockets in tropical print

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

11. ASOS DESIGN tea jumpsuit with puff sleeve and tie detail

ASOS Design
Price: €38.71

12. ASOS DESIGN cami jumpsuit with gathered bodice detail in polka dot print

ASOS Design
Price: €41.48

13. ASOS DESIGN halter neck button through mini sundress in ditsy floral print

ASOS Design
Price: €34.56

14. Monki floral print wide leg dungarees in black

Monki at ASOS
Price: €48.39

Happy (ethical, sustainable) shopping, ladies.

top gear hamster GIF

Feature image: ASOS

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With all the conversations regarding the decrepit state of our planet, it's no surprise that the terms 'ethical fashion' and 'sustainable clothing' are coming up again and again.

Whether it's the depressing lack of labour rights which garment workers possess, or the untold amount of damage a simple white t-shirt can do to the earth; it's time to get serious about the disastrous environmental impact of fashion.

Fact Attack

1. The truth of the matter is: the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, second only to the oil industry.

Unfortunately, developing countries are constantly the ones to suffer from developed nations and their materialistic consumerist culture. While high street shops have lower pricing, it's important to ask ourselves why this is so.

Normally, it's because the cost of production is incredibly cheap, and the workers aren't being paid in equity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Patagonia Dublin (@patagoniadublin) on

For example, according to Stephen Leahy of The Guardian, 100 million people in India don't have access to drinking water. However, 85 percent of the daily needs of the entire population of India would be provided by the water used to grow the country's cotton.

The same cotton that goes into making our clothes, the clothes of people who have always had access to daily needs like drinking water. So the question is, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Fast fashion is a hugely feminist issue seeing as women in these underdeveloped countries are paid less than men for working in these garment factories.

The number of workplace injuries and deaths in factories in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and Cambodia are still shockingly high.

Now, this article isn't intended to guilt or shame anyone. It's just a wake-up call, and knowing the facts of this vital topic can lead to change. Change can lead to less harm on the planet, and isn't that always a good thing?

2. First of all, it's important to know that the untreated toxic waste-waters from textile factories are often dumped directly into the rivers of countries where clothes are made.

These waste-waters contain toxic substances like arsenic, mercury and lead, which kill the aquatic life and health of millions living by that same river. Contamination reaches the sea and spreads globally.

The use of fertilizers for cotton production heavily pollute waters, another danger of creating just a single item of clothing for brands we all know and buy from. 

Image: Catch News

3. Clothing in our culture has become disposable, and more and more textile waste is accumulating as a result. According to Elizabeth Cline of The Atlantic, a family in the 'western world' throws away an average of 30kg of clothing every year.

4. Only 15 percent of this is recycled or donated, and what happens to the rest? Landfill or incineration.

What's worse, synthetic fibres like polyester are plastic fibres, and can take up to 200 years to decompose.

Global textiles production emits 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases every single year. That's more than international flights and maritime shipping put together, according to Fashion Revolution.

5. These biodegradable synthetic fibres are used in a shocking 72 percent of our clothing. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

6. The UK population has £10.5 billion worth of unworn clothes in their closet, according to recent research. It's massively valuable to donate your unworn clothes rather than throw them away. Every item of apparel has a history, and can tell a story.

Fast fashion is having an unparalleled influence on the planet, with more and more clothes being incinerated into the air every year.

Workers are suffering in poverty to make our clothes, and we have no idea who they even are. We have a responsibility to bring ethics into what we wear and how we style ourselves.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ethical & Sustainable Fashion (@thekindguide) on

The issue may seem far away, but we can't ignore the problem any longer.

Clothing is a basic human need, give someone else the chance to wear the clothes you don't want anymore.

6. The apparel industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions, because our clothes are made in countries which power their factories with coal.

This means our synthetic fibres are basically made from fossil fuel, hence why it's so important to buy clothes with natural fibres.

Image: Remake

Here's our survival guide for ethical shopping and sustainable fashion, but remember: Nobody's perfect.

Even if you reduce your buying habits a tiny bit, or change one of your high street shops to an ethical brand, that's great. Just do your best; if everyone did a little, it would mean a lot.

Swap Shops

The Nu. Wardrobe is an Irish female-led startup company focusing on dramatically reducing fashion waste by encouraging the swapping or renting of clothes. Their tag-line is 'Look Good. Save Money. Reduce Waste.'

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@thenuwardrobe) on

Right on, gals. Extending the life cycle of clothes is hugely important in the fight against fast fashion.

Why not borrow an outfit from a friend or sibling instead of buying something entirely new when you probably don't need to?

Of course, it's important to treat yourself every now and again, and we all need new threads every once and a while when our body sizes change etc, but just remember to ask yourself every time: Do I really need this?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fashion Revolution Ireland (@fashrevireland) on

Charity shopping/Vintage outlets

Dun Laoghaire's main street contains some great charity shops like Bernardos, Oxfam, Age Action, Goodwill and more.

George's Street in the city centre also have a great selection of charity shops with the proceeds going to St. Vincent de Paul, Oxfam and Enable Ireland.

The array of vintage shops in Dublin is not to be understated. Head to Dublin Vintage Factory (there are two shops) in Temple Bar for the cheapest but best selection of vintage clothing.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dublin Vintage Factory (@dublinvintagefactory) on

Vintage has emerged onto the scene even more in recent years, and has undoubtedly become one of the biggest trends in Dublin fashion.

Why not buy something no one else could possibly have? Pre-owned and pre-loved.

Other options include; Tola Vintage, Nine Crows, Lucy's Lounge, Monto, The Harlequin, Folkster, Tahiti Vintage, Om Diva, The Cat's Meow, Siopaella and Retro in George's Street Arcade and Temple Bar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tola Vintage Reworked (@tolavintagereworked) on

Apps: Depop/Good On You

Depop has become our addiction in recent months. The app is a clothes-selling platform, basically a digital swap shop, and the range of fashion styles involved is incredible.

Shipping from all over the world, the items are totally unique. You'll see some amazing style trends as well, and the app allows you to refine your searches for uber specific items and brands.

From vintage sportswear brands to quirky 1990s-era fashion pieces, don't miss out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Depop (@depop) on

It's a great feeling knowing that you aren't buying brand new clothes all the time, and the app allows you to make some $ cash dollah $ by selling all of the clothes you haven't worn since your teenage disco days.

We first heard about Good On You from none other than Emma Watson. If she models and endorses them, they have to be sheer excellence.

The app allows you to inform yourself all about the workers rights and sustainability of your favourite brands.

They offer great suggestions for ethical and sustainable brands too, and it's practical and easy to use.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Our favourite ethical/sustainable brands

Finding sustainable clothing for an affordable price can be challenging in Ireland, mainly because of shipping charges.

It's a huge comfort to know that you're paying for clothing made by people who have workers rights, and that they are high-quality. Here are some of our all-time fave brands:

Reformation

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reformation (@reformation) on

Weekday

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@weekdayofficial) on

People Tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@peopletreeuk) on

Oxfam

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Oxfam Ireland (@oxfamireland) on

Thought

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Thought (@thoughtclothing) on

Fame and Partners

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fame and Partners (@fameandpartners) on

Ilk + Ernie

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@ilkandernie) on

Ninety Percent

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ninety Percent (@ninety_percent) on

Other gorgeous favourites include: Base Range, Etica, Everlane, Uniqlo, Exhibit, Komodo, Patagonia, Athleta, Petra Von Kant, Lara Intimates, Mayamiko, Thoreau, Boyish and ASOS Made in Kenya

Last but not least, we recommend watching The True Cost on Netflix, it pulls back the curtain on fast fashion and the developing world. It's time to wear your values.

Feature image:  Instagram/@cheriebirkner/@sustainablefashionmatterz

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MTV Video Music Awards 2014 – MTV, Monday at 8pm
From Beyoncé’s 15 minute medley and emotional (staged?!) smooch with her hubbie, to Nicki Minaj performing with her dress falling off and Blue Ivy’s impressive dance moves, the annual VMA's are a must see as always.

50 Ways To Kill Your Mammy – Sky 1, Monday at 9pm
This new extreme bucket list series sees the normally lovely Baz Ashmawy make his poor 71-year-old mammy go gambling, sky diving and stunt driving. God love the poor woman!

The 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards – Sky Living, Tuesday at 8.30pm
House Of Cards, Orange Is The New Black, The Good Wife, Homeland, Scandal and Breaking Bad are just some of the shows nominated at the TV world’s version of the Oscars. One to watch is Downton Abbey with an impressive 12 nods – one hopes one’s chances are not hampered by waterbottlegate….

Pet Island – RTÉ One, Thursday at 7pm
Tonight’s episode goes behind the scenes at the St. Patrick's Day Dog Expo in Dublin, which includes contests for doggy dancing, best trick and even waggiest tails – awwww!

The X Factor Top Ten Best Moments Ever – ITV2, Friday at 8pm
In the lead up to this weekend’s launch of Season 11 there is an hourly special on EVERY night this week on ITV2! There’s a show dedicated to Simon, one to Louis, one to Cheryl and one to Dermot as they each look back at their favourite moments from the past 10 years. What better way to warm us up eh?!

 

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Happenings will air classic ‘80s teen movie, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off in Merrion Sq, Dublin 2, this Thursday 31st July.

The gates will open at 8pm where Irish Village Markets will be on hand with lots of yummy treats for the movie. The movie will then begin at 10pm.

Admission is €5 at the gate and please be aware that this is an alcohol free event.

Please note this is a Leave-No-Trace event, so please respect the environment and use bins provided.

ferris_bueller

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