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Get the umbrellas out and ready: Met Eireann has issues a rainfall warning for 18 counties amid cautions that up to 40mm of rain is to be expected.

Leinster and Munster have received the warning, which is in place from 7pm this evening until 7am on Friday morning.

The national forecaster said in a statement to the Independent: "Heavy Rain will spread from the south Thursday evening and night.

While much of today will likely remain clear and dry, "heavy rain will develop in the south and will spread northwards over the southern half of the country by nightfall" with maximum temperatures of up to 22C.

"Heavy rain will spread from the south Thursday evening and night," the national forecaster warned.

"Accumulations of 25 to 40mm will occur over a relatively short time period. Spot flooding is likely," a Met Eireann forecaster said.

Munster is predicted to be the worst affected, as downpours will be heavy with a risk of localised flooding in many areas.

Heavy rain will continue on Friday morning nationwide with a risk of thunder and temperatures of 13C.

The bad weather looks set to continue into the weekend, which is a shame considering the many events taking place in Dublin. Playstival in Airfield Estate and the Wine and Cheese festival in Eatyard are scheduled to go ahead.

Rain will persist in northern parts of the country throughout Saturday and Sunday.

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Do you know any especially wildly cranky siblings or grumpy but chilled out friends that you reckon deserve to have a massive winter storm named after them? We can think of a few.

Now is finally your chance to get a storm named in your honour, or as a tribute to a pal or member of your family. You could even get one named after your worst enemy, if that's the mood you're in.

National forecaster Met Eireann have joined forces with the UK Met Office to launch their new 'Call for Storm Names' scheme this winter, and want our help. 

The 'Name our Storms' scheme aims to raise awareness of severe weather before it strikes.

A storm warrants a name when the Met Office or Met Éireann will issue an orange or red weather warning, and you buy all the booze and bread from Tesco and barricade your gaff.

The names are chosen based on the public's submissions every year, and memorable weather events in recent years include Storm Emma, Storm Ali and Storm Ophelia.

Remember when Lidl was raided by a JCB during Storm Emma in Tallaght last year? Mad times, they were.

Storms are named in alphabetical order in the sequence they occur, with each storm alternate between the first letter of a male name and female name, similar to the pattern created by the US National Hurricane Centre in the 1970s.

Storms starting with letters Q, U, X, Y and Z won’t be used, unfortunately. The first storms last year were named Ali and Bronagh, but this winter the first storm will be female. 

Forecasters will avoid names with 'resonance' in the weather world, like 'Katrina' or 'Charlie' and famous/notorious names will be avoided. There'll be no Storm Greg (O'Shea), Storm Boris or Storm Trump. 

Use the hashtag #IrishStormNames on Twitter to send your suggestion, email Met Éireann at stormnames@met.ie or write to Evelyn Cusack, Met Éireann, Glasnevin Hill, Dublin 9.

We deserve a Storm Maura after her explosive entrance into this year's Love Island villa, don't you agree?

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Get the suncream out everyone, we look set to have a scorcher on our hands.  

Ireland will be getting some rays from the Europe-wide heatwave as temperatures will inch towards highs of 28C.

A Status Yellow heat warning has been issued by Met Éireann for Galway, Mayo, Clare, Cork, Kerry, and Limerick.

If you want to avoid the heat, stay indoors between 1pm to 7pm tonight.

Met Eireann forecaster Dr. Clara Finkele said, ''It will reach those temperatures of 27, 28 in those counties along the west coast, generally we're looking at 22, 24, 25, 26 degrees nationwide, maybe a few degrees lower in the east coast.'' 

She continued, ''Early next week, the temperatures will return to more normal temperatures in high teens, low 20s, mainly 21, 22, degrees by midweek next week.”

Pride parade attendees will be in for a stunning day this Sunday with 25 degrees expected in some parts of the country.

Dr. Finkele. said, ''Saturday is still a warm day, 20 to 25 degrees but then the winds will turn westerly for Sunday and it will be actually quite breezy. And then, temperatures will return to 17 to 20 degrees.''

It might not be a fab as 2018's summer, but we'll happily take it.

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Storm Hannah is on her way to visit us, lads, and we've got to be extra cautious tonight. A red weather warning has officially been issued by Met Éireann in Clare from 8pm tonight until 11pm.

An orange warning has been issued for wind in Galway from 7pm until midnight tonight. 

Winds are especially strong along the coast, and the public has been warned to avoid coastal areas completely.

Wind warnings for Clare, Cork, Kerry and Limerick are in place from 4pm today until 1am tomorrow, and warnings for wind in Waterford and Tipperary are issued from 10pm tonight until 2pm tomorrow.

A yellow wind alert has been sent out from 11pm for counties in the south east, north-west and the west of Ireland.

Gardaí are appealing to the public to be aware of the dangers posed by high winds those who are living near coastal, cliff and waterway areas are advised to be extra cautious.

Met Éireann have said that northwesterly winds will reach speeds of over 80 km/h with 'violent gusts' of 130 to 150 km/h for a period this evening. Jaysis.

Road users are cautioned to plan your journeys in advance, and be careful of stopping distances on wet roads.

It's going to be a breezy weekend, lads. Prepare to get your Rihanna out and werk some umbrellas.

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If we went already over the bout of bad weather we have been having, – it's about to get worse. 

Met Eireann predict heavy showers and risk of thunder today, so basically grab a hot water bottle and hope for the best. 

According to the meteorological service: 'Heavy showers of rain or hail this morning in the western half of the country with a risk of thunder near the coast.'

'Towards evening, heavy, thundery rain will develop in the west.'

As if that wasn't bad enough, the thunder and rainfall will clear up to make way for icy conditions. 

'This evening and early tonight, thundery rain will spread eastwards across the country.'

'It will be heavy with hail and sleet in places. The rain will clear eastwards overnight.'

'Clear weather will follow with frost and some icy patches developing.' 

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It's going to be a bitterly cold week, by the looks of things. Met Éireann have just issued a status yellow weather warning for Ireland, with snow and ice predicted.

They updated their website this morning, writing: "Very cold this week with showers of hail, sleet and snow, frequent across the southwest, west and north, where some significant accumulations are possible this evening and overnight."

"There will be widespread frost with icy stretches on untreated surfaces." they added, stating the potential for further significant snowfall on Thursday around the country.

The warning will be updated tomorrow morning, and will be in place until Saturday at 6pm.

Today, we're expecting a cold day with a mixture of sunny spells and scattered wintry showers, as rain and sleet clears eastwards.

There is also a risk of hail and thunder in Atlantic coastal areas, with the western half of the county expecting showers and snowfall.

Maximum temperatures will range from two to five degrees, let's hope we don't get snow like last year. 

Thursday will see sleet and snow continuing across the south of Ireland, but the northern half of the country should remain dry. Severe frost is incoming on Thursday night, with temperatures of just one to four degrees.

Yikes…wrap up warm out there. Hopefully it doesn't drop too far below zero degrees.

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If you're getting your glam on tonight or planned some Christmas shopping tomorrow – get ready for some BAD weather.

Brollies at the ready as it will bucket down from midnight tonight.

Met Éireann has issued two status yellow weather warnings for the country – so brace yourself for the rain and the wind.

Met Éireann has advised Crimbo shoppers and rugby heads on route to the Aviva tomorrow for the Leinster match, to keep an eye on weather updates.

Forget the heels and grab the wellies as 30 to 55mm of heavy rain is set to fall and mountainous areas are predicted to exceed these limits. 

Hit the hat trend as the wind is coming for perfectly styled hair, with speeds of 55 to 60 km/h forecasted, with the strongest gusts hitting the east of the country.

The wind will then take it up a notch with severe gusts of 90 to 110 km/h predicted for later in the day – if it isn't too late to cancel your plans, use any lame excuse to stay indoors.

Additionally, you need to watch out for spot flooding on Saturday. 

If you want us, we will be curled up all day with Netflix, snacks and online shopping.

You couldn't pay us to go out in those type of conditions.

We will see you all on Sunday when the terrible weather finally eases. 

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People gathered under bus stops yesterday as torrents of rain piled down throughout the day.

We’ve had horrible weather at the tail end of this week and unfortunately, it doesn’t look like tomorrow is going to be any different.

More rain has been predicted by Met Éireann as well as the possibility of hail and thunderstorms.

Meteorologist Joan Blackburn announced what tomorrow’s weather will look like on RTE Radio One.

“It will be cool and bright tomorrow with mist and early frost clearing. Sunny spells and scattered showers are likely during the morning.

“Those scattered showers will become widespread in the afternoon, some if these showers heavy or of hail, and there’s a risk of isolated thunderstorms.

“The heavy showers will continue overnight,” she warned.

A high of 12 degrees is expected tomorrow and the hail and thunderstorm prediction will carry on through Monday.

The rain will continue until Wednesday evening when it is expected to dissipate into scattered, light showers.

So, make sure to bundle up for the rest of the weekend and stay warm. It’d be best to postpone outdoor plans for now.

The good news is that traffic is said to be running more smoothly after yesterday’s horrendous delays.

And hopefully, Irish transport will be prepared for the upcoming weather come Monday.

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Met Éireann has given us some chilly news today: cold and frosty winds could pair with low temperatures to give us a bitterly frosty Bank Holiday Weekend.

Forecasters are now saying that this arctic weather could go on until the end of the month, so prepare yourself for an emotional goodbye to the recent warm tropical spells.

Daytime figures look like it will be a struggle to stay above zero, while the nights will see temperatures drop to minus two at least.

The big chill is predicted to arrive on Thursday night, with Met Eireann claming that "The cold and bright weather continues through the weekend with daytime temps of 7 to 9 degrees; the nights will be frosty with temperatures falling to between -2 to +2 degrees.

Met Eireann also added that temperatures for the long October Bank Holiday weekend will be “below average” and that we might get pelted with hail showers throughout.

"Early indications suggest it will be cold and windy over the weekend with a mix of sunny spells and showers, some of the showers will be heavy with the risk of hail and thunder. Daytime maximum temperatures will be in the high single figures and with the risk of frost at night, especially on Sunday night."

This is going to be a shock to the system, to say the least.

The chances of an early Halloween bonfire are looking fairly slim, put away those fireworks lads.

cold bill murray GIF

Our advice is to arm yourself with some hot water bottles, fluffy socks and a onesie.

Winter is coming, people. Even Jon Snow is wrapping himself up, burrito-style.

 

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We have just committed to our winter coat for another season of bitter coldness, but Met Eireann is here to wreck out hygee buzz. 

In case you hadn't noticed when you stepped out your front door this morning, it's freakishly mild today compared to what we have become accustomed to. 

Wave goodbye to your heavy coat today, as temperatures could reach heights of 221 degrees – but keep your umbrella to hand. 

'Today will be mainly dry with a fair amount of cloud and some sunny spells,' says Met Eireann. 

'The best of the sunshine will be over the southern half of the country.'

'There'll be a little drizzle at times near northwest and north coasts.'

'It will be quite warm with highest temperatures of 16 to 20 degrees and moderate to fresh southwest breezes.'

So, it was too soon to break out the gloves and hats?

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Emergency shelters have opened, mobile alerts have been received and the rain is pouring. 

Hawaiians are now bracing themselves for landfall of one of the worst hurricanes to hit the Islands since Hurricane Iniki in 1992.

The path of the hurricane is forecasted to pass very close to the north-west of the islands today and tomorrow. 

As Hurricane Lane draws closer, emergency shelters on Wednesday opened their doors on the Big Island and on the islands of Maui, Molokai and Lanai. 

In fear of the roads becoming impassable on the south coast of Molokai, officials warned residents who require shelter to get there sooner rather than later.

Shelters were made available today on the island of Oahu, as the island received a weather warning late yesterday. 

The Mayor of the Island, Kirk Caldwell, issued a warning this morning for Islanders to brace themselves for the impending weather event.

"O'ahu us now under a Hurricane Warning, meaning that we are now less than 36 hours from potential hurricane weather conditions. Please ensure that you and your family are prepared," he said.   

Currently, Hurricane Lane is ranked as a category four storm out of five on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

It means the storm has the potential to bring winds of 130 to 156mph.

Officials have said that the storm could be downgraded to a category three by Thursday afternoon.

However, that is still a major weather event and could bring winds of 111-129 mph causing devastating damage. 

The impact of the approaching hurricane is already being felt on the Big Island.

Flash floods warnings are in place.

Over the last 12 hours, it has been reported that 8" of rain has fallen on the Big Island.

The slow movement of the storms increases the threat for prolonged heavy rainfall, said NWSHonolulu.

Governor David Ige issued a warning to residents this morning, saying:

"Due to potential hazards & emergency vehicle operations, travel in coastal areas & ocean recreation should be avoided. Large breaking surf, significant shorebreak, & dangerous currents make entering the water extremely hazardous and could face significant injury or death."

Hawaii doesn't usually get hit with central Pacific storms as bad as Hurricane Lane.

The last major hurricane was Iniki in 1992 which claimed the lives of six people and injured more than 100.

The 1992 storm caused an estimated $3 billion in damage.  

Public schools will remain closed for the rest of the week.

Local government workers are urged to remain home unless they are essential employees.

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The final festival of the summer is looming, and like most of the attendees, we're already trying to plan what we want to wear. 

However, that planning process is pretty difficult when we have no idea what kind of weather we can expect from the weekend. 

Luckily, the first forecasts are out, and we're hoping they improve as we get closer to Electric Picnic. 

 

A post shared by Electric Picnic (@epfestival) on

According to Accuweather, the outlook isn't so sunny for the upcoming festival. 

On the Friday, revellers descending on Stradbally can expect 'considerable cloudiness' with a 25% chance of rain. 

On Saturday, when Massive Attack headlines, it's likely to rain, with a 55% chance of the heavens opening above the campsites. 

 

A post shared by Electric Picnic (@epfestival) on

On a potentially muddy Sunday, the rain should clear, with highs of 18 degrees celcius and a mere 25% chance of rain.  

All three night spent in tents will feel lows of 10 degrees celcius, so bring a blanket, a hoody and some fluffy socks for sleeping in. 

Moral of the story? Pack a poncho, just in case. 

Feature image: Ruth Medjber

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