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Ireland

We think it is one of the best!  The magnificently restored Georgian estate in County Meath, is also celebrating 10 years of delivering truly unique, exclusive weddings and events to guests from Ireland and overseas. To mark the occasion, Clonabreany House has launched its ‘A Passion for Provenance’ menu celebrating the very best of seasonal, Irish produce and its continued commitment to local suppliers. The stunning setting of Clonabreany House, which led to it being chosen as the location for The Great Irish Bake Off in 2013, is complimented by the highest quality, bespoke service ensuring that this beautiful venue is constantly in high demand. The quality of the food at Clonabreany House and the team’s commitment to local suppliers, is undoubtedly one of its key differentiating factors.

The 'A Passion for Provenance' menu celebrates Clonabreany's commitment to Irish produce and the valuable relationships that the team has developed with local suppliers which includes sourcing fresh fruit and vegetables from Grange Farm in Trim, breakfast products from Doherty Craft Butchers in Kells and the highest quality beef from CR Tormey's farm in Kilbeggan.

Executive chef Simon Mooney’s menu also celebrates award-winning produce from all over Ireland, such as Goatsbridge trout, Velvet Cloud cheese and yoghurt, Wild Irish Foragers preserves and syrups, and Highbank Orchards apple cider, balsamic vinegar and pink apple juice, to name just a few.

Simon commented: “At Clonabreany House we utilise the finest, seasonal ingredients to ensure that every guest has a wonderfully memorable dining experience. We take particular pride in meeting guest’s individual dietary requirements, whether that’s vegan, vegetarian or a preference for plant-based, we strive to deliver a top-level restaurant experience for every guest.”

Mary O’Neill, General Manager, Clonabreany House commented: “Our food offering has always been an integral part of the unique Clonabreany House experience. We’re delighted to mark our 10th birthday with the launch of this new menu. We look forward to welcoming and celebrating with many more happy guests in the future.”

The opening of Clonabreany House in 2009 marked the unveiling of a 10-year restoration project of the 18th century land master house and adjoining courtyard, which received an Ellison Award from An Taisce for excellence in conservation. Guests celebrating at Clonabreany House have exclusive use of the beautiful buildings, which can cater for groups of 220 and accommodation for 90 guests, with further accommodation options available in the local area and neighbouring towns.

The hugely successful private wedding and event venue is a key employer in the area, and generates significant business for other suppliers in the wider area such as florists, photographers, musicians etc. on an ongoing basis.

www.clonabreanyhouse.ie

 

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Gardaí in Dún Laoghaire are seeking the public’s assistance in locating the whereabouts of 14-year-old Emma McAlinden who was last seen this morning, Thursday, November 7, 2019 at approximately 9am.

When last seen Emma was walking in the area of Shanganagh Park, Shankill. Emma is described as being 5' 5" in height, slim build with long red hair and brown eyes.

Emma was wearing her school uniform which is a grey jumper, grey and red pin stripe skirt, black jacket and carrying a black school bag.

Gardaí and Emma’s family are very concerned for her whereabouts.

Anyone with any information is asked to contact Dún Laoghaire Garda Station on 666 5000, the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111 or any Garda Station.

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A man in his twenties remains in custody after the body of a boy was found in Limerick on Sunday evening.

Gardaí discovered the body of a boy, believed to be 11-years-old, in the Ballynanty area of Limerick City.

The young boy was found with numerous injuries shortly after 7pm. He was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

Gardaí arrested a man in his 20s after finding the boy. He is currently detained under Section 4 of the Criminal Justice Act, 1984 at Henry Street Garda Station.

They stated that they’re investigating all of the circumstances of the boy’s death.

The scene is preserved for a forensic and technical examination. The State Pathologist will carry out a preliminary examination later today.

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Research from the Higher Education Authority (HEA) has presented results on the graduates who are most likely to find a job after college.

Naturally, we were curious and had to check out the scores. Unsurprisingly, creative work seems fairly sparse *sighs*.

As it turns out, teachers are the most likely to find a job after they graduate, with over 93 percent of recent education grads finding employment within nine months of finishing their course.

The HEA's research found that graduates in areas such as health and welfare (87 percent), ICT (82 percent) and engineering (82 percent) had especially high employment outcomes.

Nearly 80 percent of third-level students secured work within nine months of graduating, which is good news.

The HEA found that students who studied subjects like philosophy and literature were the LEAST likely to be employed…sorry to all those deep thinkers and bookworms out there.

Anyone who completed their arts and humanities studies were actually among the highest percentages who embarked on further study, at 24 percent.

The study involved 29,000 participants who graduated back in 2017, and found that teaching grads are one of the best paid. Their starting salaries mostly came in at €30-€35,000.

The average salary of full-time graduates in employment was €33,574. The HEA's Valerie Harvey said that those who complete further study are the most employable.

She commented on the research, saying that; "The overwhelming majority of all graduates are working and as you move through the levels of educational attainment higher numbers are in employment."

She continued, "So we found that 75 percent of honours degree, 86 percent of post-graduate taught and 91 percent of postgraduate research graduates are in employment."

78 percent of those participants surveyed are working or due to begin a job, and 14 percent of those surveyed are in training or further education.

A further five percent are searching for work, and the remainder are in "further activities", like travelling the world or saving the turtles. Apparently, 90 percent of those who graduate find a job in Ireland. That one surprised us, alright.

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The sunny weather has finally made an appearance and we can’t help but daydream about summer adventures. Spending the summer in New York sounds perfect, but unfortunately, our bank accounts are stopping that dream from coming true.

Luckily, there are plenty of places to visit around the Emerald Isle that are perfect if you’re in need of some time away from reality.

There's one place you must visit this summer and it’s the charming town of Clonakilty, Co.Cork. The West Cork town is one of the nicest parts of the county with the stunning Inchydoney Beach, snug pubs, plenty of dinky cafes and dozens of historical sites including Michael Collins House.

Once you arrive in the colourful and vibrant town you’ll never want to leave. The locals and their cheery disposition will make you feel like you’ve lived there your entire life.

There are plenty of hidden gems in Clonakilty that will make your trip all the more memorable.

1: Cafe On The Lane

This quirky spot is hidden down Spillers Lane, tucked away from the hustle and bustle of the main streets. The cafe is covered in bunting and fairy lights, with fresh flowers donning every table. The main seating area is full of mismatched, vintage furniture that adds to the character of the place. Treat yourself to a croissant or a brownie and a cup of coffee and listen to Elvis play on the cafe's record player.

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2: Cycle around Clon​​​

Clonakilty is the first rural community to offer a bike rental scheme. There’s no better way to see the glorious town than cycling around Clonakilty, especially when the sun is shining. The Clonakilty Bike Scheme even shares advice on how to cycle safely on West Cork roads. Cycle out to Long Strand, which is only 20 minutes away from the town. Take in the breathtaking scenes and breathe in that fresh sea air.

3: Pints in Scannells

This gastropub is the heart of the town, known as the small pub with the big garden, you just have to visit Scannells for a quick pint and a bite to eat. You’ll struggle to leave the pub with the infectious atmosphere and assortment of live music, from jazz to trad, Scannells has something for everyone.

4: A bookworm’s paradise

The Children’s Project charity shop may just look like every other charity shop, but once you go upstairs you’ll be greeted by mountains and mountains of books. The second floor of the shop is a bookworm's idea of heaven. They have shelves full of best-sellers, horror tales, young adult novels, well-loved classics, popular chick-lit books more. You’ll go in for a quick browse and end up leaving the shop hours later with bags full of books.

Clonakilty is the perfect place to visit if you need to escape to the country, especially when the sun is shining!

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Coca-Cola hosted their inaugural Melodic Wood area at All Together Now festival in Waterford, purely to create an atmospheric chill-out zone.

The area centred solely around sustainability and was an immersive experience thanks to the electronic music supplied by rising Irish music duo; Prizm.

Those at the festival who were drinking cans were encouraged to bring them along to be pressed into leaves for the installation, with Coca-Cola commissioning native trees in Waterford alongside Native Woodland Trust.

Coca-Cola has donated €10,300 towards the commissioning of 412 native trees to be planted in Waterford, following the success of the Melodic Wood area and it's hypnotic lights show.

The Native Woodland Trust are Ireland’s only organisation with a sole focus on preserving our ancient woodlands, and it's hard to believe that they're the only ones.

We chatted to Prizm as well as the Native Woodland trust about their time in the Melodic Wood, and the importance of Ireland's forests at this critical time in the planet's environmental history.

Image: Instagram/@we_areprizm

 Prizm are an up and coming electronic duo comprised of Ivan Nicholas and producer Aidan Bond, alumni of the Sound Training College in Temple Bar.

Their intricate knowledge of sound, coupled with their varied instrumental experience leads to standout performances. Their first headline show is set for later this year, and they're scheduled to play a string of festival performances and gigs this year. 

We were dying to ask them about their Melodic Wood gig, which acted as a useful yet artistic recycling hub for festival goers.

The Wood's eight trees were all created from recycled materials, with the area forming part of the Native Woodland Trust's wider World Without Waste initiative. World Without Waste commits to collect and recycle the equivalent of every can or bottle that they sell by 2030.

We quizzed them on everything from their first meeting to their involvement in the environmental project;

  • How do you think your music fuses with nature? 

For the song we wrote for Coca-Cola’s Melodic Wood at All Together Now 2019, part of the request was to incorporate nature sounds, we used wind and rustling trees in the intro of the track, and it worked really nicely. 

  • How did you both meet, and when did you decide to become a duo? 

We were working in the same place and got talking about music and quickly realized we both wrote and produced music. We strangely had the same vision for a project, so it kicked off from there.

Image: Instagram/@we_areprizm
  • What are your thoughts on Ireland’s attitude to sustainability?

It’s going in the right direction, small things like cardboard straws are a good start but it’s obviously a global problem, you have to start somewhere at the same time. 

  • Why are you named ‘Prizm’?”

In optics, a prism is a transparent optical element with flat, polished surfaces that refract light. At least two of the flat surfaces must have an angle between them. “ We are part of the two… it made sense for us musically and we just both totally agreed on the name.

  • How did you become involved with the Melodic Wood and All Together Now?

We put our song forward and Coca-Cola loved it. 

  • How do you think Ireland’s music scene can become more eco-friendly and sustainable?

Taking home your tents and cleaning up after yourself is simple and makes a huge difference.

  • Do you think music has the power to encourage people to focus on climate breakdown and the environment? 

No, people have the power.

  • What are your hopes for the future of your music? 

We want to release our debut song and work towards an album. Our live show is very important to us, we want to be a touring band. 

  • What would be your dream gig to play? 

Closing out a big festival. Our shows will have all the right ingredients to bring you back to life.

Image: Instagram/@we_areprizm

Prizm seem like the ideal artists to have played the Melodic Wood, as All Together Now have been an eco-focused festival from the beginning.

The band too share an interest in reducing their carbon footprint, and we were intrigued to hear what the Native Woodland Trust had to say about the installation.

The Native Woodland Trust is the only environmental organisation in Ireland with a focus on saving the last of Ireland's Ancient Woodlands, now down to as little as 0.1 percent of what originally existed.

The Trust is also the only Irish environmental organisation which has raised the funding to acquire and save some of these woodlands while also planting thousands of trees every year. The Trust now manages 11 woodlands and nature reserves across Ireland, from Donegal to Waterford. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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  • How did the Melodic Wood installation come about?

We were delighted to be contacted by Coca-Cola to provide new trees to complement their recycling concept. The Native Woodland Trust is the only non-profit in Ireland with a network of nature reserves where we plant new woodlands, so we were able to commit to planting new trees for Coca-Cola as part of the Melodic Wood initiative which comes under their World Without Waste global strategy.

  • Can you tell us a bit about Ireland’s Ancient Woods?

Ireland’s Ancient Woodlands are those that have been in continuous existence since at least 1650 – this means that they predate most imports of trees and are directly descended from the primeval forests that once covered almost all of Ireland. They are the most biodiverse habitats we have and are often home to rare and unusual species. 

  • What do you think Ireland’s woodland will look like in 30 years?

A few things will change – but gradually. We will continue to lose our old and ancient woodlands – they are not all protected and the protection is poorly policed. We will also lose some more species – some perhaps due to climate change – and gain some too – especially insects and birds. But our Ash trees, which is one of the most common trees in the country and famously used to make hurleys, will become as rare as Elm trees are today.

  • What would happen if Ireland lost its woodland and nature reserves?

We would lose a huge part of our cultural and environmental heritage. Trees and woods were a significant part of Gaelic culture – with even our native Ogham alphabet having its letters twinned with the different trees of the forest.  We would also lose our connection to the original primeval forests of Ireland – which once were thronged with bears and wolves and were the source of many myths and legends. And of course, we would lose biodiversity in a very significant way.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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  • What worries you the most about climate breakdown?

On a small island like Ireland, many species will not have the ability to simply move north – so we may lose some species. Higher temperatures and changing weather patterns may also add stress to various habitats, like woodlands and make them more prone to damage and disease. Climate change may very well alter the composition of our woodlands and change the face of our countryside.

  • How sustainable do you think Ireland’s festivals are?

They’re clearly improving hugely and its clearly part of the ethos of just about every festival now. Most festivals also now invite environmental groups to have a stand or kiosk, which is a great way to get our messages across to people and to allow them to actually engage with us in ways that we can’t do on social media or email.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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  • What does the Native Woodland Trust hope to achieve in the future, what are its aims?

We are also trying to prevent the loss of any more Ancient Woodland. We only have approximately 0.1 percent of those woodlands left – so 99.9 percent have been cut down, and yet now in the 21st century, we’re still losing some of what’s left. We would ultimately like to be able to plant a huge new forest – thousands of acres, which could make a really meaningful difference to people of wildlife.

  • How can we help the Native Woodland Trust?

There are lots of ways to help – join as a member, sponsor some trees – as presents, to offset your carbon or just because you want to. Come and volunteer with us – especially if you live near one of our reserves, there’s always lots of work to get involved with. If you run a company or work for one who will listen – get them to take out a corporate sponsorship with us.

  • Are businesses and specific corporations causing the most issues regarding the conservation of our landscapes?

Obviously agriculture and industry has a huge impact – but we as individuals are consuming these outputs and as a species, humanity needs to change its very wasteful behaviour. If we become less wasteful, we can change the behaviour of those businesses that produce them and who use up our natural resources. 

Wherever humans go, we tend to wipe out wildlife. We need to give some space back to nature and to leave it to its own devices, without human interference. 

  • What is it about Ireland’s landscapes that makes you so inspired and passionate?

For such a small island, we have such diverse landscapes, many of them as dramatic and picturesque as anywhere in the world. Within these, there are so many wild habitats that are home to our many native plants and animals. There’s something still innately wild about Ireland and its landscapes and its always a pleasure to be outdoors in nature in Ireland.

You can watch the Melodic Wood’s All Together Now journey here –and join the conversation using #WorldWithoutWaste. To volunteer with the Native Woodland Trust, click here.

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The giggles, the embarrassment and the speculation circled the classroom – a lady was on her way to teach us about sex.

Cue the dildo sitting in the centre of the table and the dodgy glances between a bunch of 17-year-old girls.

After a brief, two-sentence description on what a penis was – it was whipped away, as the woman exclaimed that we would be WAAAY too distracted by the sight of the male anatomy  – b*tch, please.

Periods, pregnancy and STIs were mentioned, and that was it – that's all I can remember about my sex education in school – but it seems like I was one of the lucky ones.

Grilling the SHEmazing office about their sex ed, more often than not I got the reply of – 'we didn't get any,' 'I went to an all-girls school,' or 'there was the advice of waiting until you were married.'

I'm not gonna lie but I was stunned – but I don't know why? If you even try to talk to the majority of Irish men about periods – they're clueless, and that it isn't entirely their fault – it's the culture we've been raised with.

Shame around sex, unplanned pregnancy and masturbation are commonplace in classrooms around the country.

But the lack of sex education means that young people are missing out on serious topics too – these are just a number of topics that weren't discussed in our Irish sex education lessons.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Consent

It is only in the last couple of years has the issue of consent been raised in our society.

Yet still, people dismiss the importance of teaching men and women what is and isn't consensual sex, kissing and touching.

The word wasn't even uttered in the classroom and when the possibility of it being taught in universities arose, people scoffed.

If you do have the opportunity to go and learn about consent, please do.

Porn

God forbid that the 'expert' stood at the top of the room might address the issue of what you see in porn. 

But we could only imagine the looks and dismissal you would receive if you even try to ask the question.

Yet the porn industry is a problem for young men and women around the country – leading to very high, misinformed expectations and unreasonable pressure around sex for both parties.

More often than not, both genders feel like their body and performances can't live up to what they see on porn – and FYI, the reason for that is because porn isn't reality. 

Unplanned Pregnancy, Miscarriage, The Morning After Pill, Abortion and Fertility issues

Usually, the pregnancy topic is approached from a very unrealistic standpoint – "when you find yourself a nice husband, you can settle down and have a baby." 

I know first hand what unplanned pregnancy feels like and I can confirm that none of my sex ed helped me prepare myself for how scary and challenging the situation was.

There's no information offered surrounding the morning after pill, the time window you have to use it and how effective it is.

And of course, because abortion was illegal – it wasn't even dared to be uttered.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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However, the topic of miscarriage could and should have been spoken about, so if you ever find yourself in this heartbreaking situation, you know what to do and what to expect – to know that you aren't alone and you haven't done anything wrong in your pregnancy.

Fertility issues are very common in our society, particularly conditions such as endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome – yet we weren't given any information about the signs, symptoms and treatments available.

Contraception and STIs

Though some of us got the condom on the banana job – most of us didn't get a good understanding of what types of different options we have out there.

What the side effects come with different contraceptives, how effective they may or may not be and how crucial double protection is – (I now have a four-year-old thanks to this).

And although some of us got to grips with STDs and STIs, it was with a lot of stigma instead of real advice.

Education and being comfortable with the subject is becoming more and more important as there had been a 10 percent increase in STIs from 2016 to 2017.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Empowerment of personal sexuality, masturbation and sexual orientation

Want to learn that it's perfectly healthy to explore your body, mind and sexuality? Then don't go to your sex ed class in school.

More often than not, these subjects aren't even touched. 

Enjoying sex, masturbation and those we chose to love should be embraced and not shamed, since in the real world the majority of people don't give a flying f**k.

No LGBT or LGBTQ organisations were even mentioned or how normal it is to be attracted to the same sex.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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It's time to reform the way we educate the young people of Ireland.

Stop the archaic view of sex and give the next generation useful information on what they really need to know about.

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When we think of our list of 'must-see before we die' destinations, marvels like The Great Barrier Reef, Machu Picchu and the azure waters of Indonesia's Bali spring to mind. 

However, in a recent survey, it was revealed that Ireland made the top three when it came to ultimate bucket list destinations. 

The study by Provision Living, based in the US, found that the country topping the chart is Australia- which is exactly the kind of stunning, beachy location we envisioned for a bucket list topper. 

Next up is vibrant Italy, whose culture, food and reputation for stunning scenery as well as a wealth of historic sites make it one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. 

Third, we have our own, home grown Ireland.

Renowned for it's beautiful rural scenery, history of creatives (we arent known as the isle of saints and scholars for nothing), Celtic history and vibrant traditional music. 

Rounding off the top 10 are:

4. Japan

5. United Kingdom

6. France

7. Greece

8. Bahamas

9. Egypt

10. Germany 

Despite Ireland making it into the top three of most coveted countries, no Irish cities made it into the Top 20 Bucket List cities. 

While 95% of people surveyed had a Bucket List, 57% said that financial issues are preventing them from being able to travel. 

A further 11% cited family commitments, while 2% very honestly put it down to laziness. 

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We were all dragged to various Irish beaches as a child, and most likely didn't appreciate them for how beautiful they were at the time.

From the beaches of Wexford like Curracloe and Rosslare to the Wild Atlantic Way's gems along the Dingle peninsula and Sligo; we've got some absolute beauties in the Emerald Isle.

Apparently, everyone else in the world agrees with this statement. A travel media company which specialises in travel guides for adventurers, Big 7, has named a County Mayo beach as number 11 in the world.

Image: Instagram/@ailismangan

Keem Bay in Mayo has earned the 11th spot in their list of the global 50 best beaches, and we're fairly chuffed with ourselves.

First Skellig Michael appears in Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens, and now the beaches around Achill Island are reppin'? We're certainly punching above our weight.

Writing in the guide, they state: 

"Keem Bay is a breathtaking rural and sheltered beach surrounded by cliffs on Ireland's largest island – Achill Island. Its gleaming white sand rivals tropical islands and the water is superbly clear."

Image: Instagram/@alisonlacloche

They add: "The sun might not always be shining, but when it does it’s world-class. And yes, it’s beautiful even on a rainy day." Dead right.

The beach is cradled by the rolling green hills of Benmore and Croaghaun mountain on three sides and opens out onto clear blue waters. It's brilliant if you want an escape from urban life.

We were narrowly beaten from entering the top 10 by famed Pig Beach in the Bahamas. Zlanti rat (Golden Horn Beach) in Brac, Croatia, snagged the number one spot.

Image: Instagram/@croatiaweek

Glass Beach in California, black sand beaches of Reynisfjara Beach in Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland, the unpolluted Grace Bay in Turks and Caicos and dunes of Whitehaven Beach in Whitsunday Islands, Australia, were also included.

Praia do Camilo in Lagos, Portugal, with its orange cliffs and golden sandy beaches, also landed in the top 10. The beaches are all otherworldly and stunning in their own right, so we're considering ourselves lucky to have even made the top 50.

Feature image: Instagram/@jmcgahon

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Love Island star Greg O'Shea has jetted out of the villa in order to attend his beloved grandmother's funeral in Ireland this week.

The Irish rugby player and solicitor left the ITV reality show base for Dublin in an unprecedented move. 

The 24-year-old returned immediately to the Spanish island of Majorca following the service yesterday, which must have been a difficult time.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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His dad Niall O'Shea spooke to Limerick Live 95 about the funeral, and praised producers for allowing Greg to come home; 

"Greg is a very good family man and his mother wanted to make sure he was there because himself and his Nan, got on well."

Monica Ho from Raheen, Limerick "passed away peacefully on July 19, 2019, in the care of Talbot Lodge Nursing Home, surrounded by her loving family."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The 24-year-old charming Irishman has gained a huge amount of fans since joining the show last week, but no reference will be made to his granny's passing on the show.

The Ireland Rugby Sevens player admitted that he can't hold back his opinions at times, like fellow Irish contestant Maura Higgins;

“I see something that I don’t agree with, I’m not able to hold it to myself – I always have to say something. I struggle to bite my tongue," he said.

His sister Laura told Today FM that Greg kept his arrival on the show a secret from his family.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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"It's a shock to say the least. We found out with everyone else, he was completely secret the whole time so the shock was very large in our house last night in Corbally.

"Look, we’re happy for him, he’s clearly having such a good time so let's just see what happens," she added.

"He took off from Paris, he was over there, we did get a weird request for a couple pairs of shorts and sunglasses but we just thought it was for Paris and that he had met a lovely girl in Paris, but no, he was packing a bag for Majorca."

Feature image: Instagram/@gregoshea

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Veganism – it's taking hold of the world and it seems that everyone is becoming or has become vegan these days.

Ireland has definitely caught up with its European counterparts when it comes to giving meat the chop from our diets.

When ranked, the most popular countries for veganism in 2018 shows that Ireland came in at…number eight. 

Looks like the days of Irish stew are long behind us. 

Image result for worldwide veganism

Veganism means nothing animal based – so no meat nor fish nor dairy nor honey.

As well as food, it also means embracing a lifestyle where you don't wear leather or wool or visit the zoo.

For people, it all means different things for different people – for some, it's all about animal rights and others it's about having a healthier diet.

So where do other countries come on the list? 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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We have, in order…
1.        Australia (Score 100)
2.        United Kingdom (Score 98)
3.        New Zealand (Score 87)
4.        Sweden (Score 84)
5.        Canada (Score 79)
6.         Israel (Score 78)
7.         United States (Score 65)
8.         Ireland (Score 62)
9.         Austria (Score 60)
10.       Germany (Score 59)

Ireland has climbed from 11th place in 2018 to 8th this year, which puts it below the United States, but above European vegan powerhouse Germany.

The vegan diet is becoming so popular in Ireland that last year Deliveroo reported a 73% jump in vegan orders across the country through its app, clearly showing there’s a change in the air.

And when it comes to veganism in Ireland itself, the top five places are as follows: Bray (Score 100), Galway (Score 90), Dublin (Score 83), Cork (Score 81), Waterford (Score 78).

So we're not doing too badly when it comes to the health stakes.

Fair play to us we say. 

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With Mother’s Day just around the corner, AppliancesDelivered.ie, Ireland’s highest rated electrical retailer, carried out a nationwide survey to find out what exactly makes Irish Mammies the best in the world. The survey found that Irish men will spend more than their female counterparts when it comes to spoiling their Mammy with gifts this week. And Cork people came out on top for generosity compared to the rest of the country, with nearly one in three planning to spend between €60 and €80 on a Mother’s Day gift.

Don’t tell Mam:

No matter how hard we try, there’s not much that can get past the ‘all-knowing’ Irish mammy. She’s got eyes and ears all over the place and you’re only fooling yourself if you think you can pull a fast one on her.

So, it comes as no surprise that 40 percent of respondents revealed that their mothers know absolutely everything about them – whether they like it or not.

However, there are a few of us out there who managed to keep the odd secret or two. The most common responses included hidden body piercings, smoking, and teenage antics.

“Mam, please. You’re embarrassing me”:

While they may be the queens of world, it’s not all tea, chats and cuddles, with over 70 percent of respondents admitting their mothers could get on their nerves from time to time. The most common offences include telling her friends about their personal lives (31.76 percent), criticising their appearance (25.88 percent), and cleaning up whenever she comes to visit (10.59 percent).

A nation of Mammy’s boys:

It’s no secret that Irish mammies are guilty of mollycoddling their sons, but it seems the affection works both ways, with 32 percent of men surveyed revealing they call their mothers at least once a day, and a further 10 percent admitting to calling multiple times per day.

Results also revealed that 26 percent of men still call on their mothers to iron their shirts, while 8 percent of men aged between 35-44 admitted they still rely on their mothers to make their doctor’s appointments.

What’s more, Irish men will also spend more on Mother’s Day gifts this year, with 28 percent saying they plan to spend between €40 and €60, compared to just 27 percent of women.

Just for you, Mam:

Speaking of gifts, it’s Cork mothers who are in for the biggest treat this Sunday, with almost one third of respondents in the Rebel County (29 percent) revealing they’ll spend between €60 and €80, compared to the national average of €20 – €40.

But of course, you can’t put a price on quality time – and there’ll be plenty of that had across Irish households this Sunday, with 83 percent of men and women surveyed saying they’ll make special effort to visit their mothers on the day.

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