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Temple Street Children's University Hospital has claimed that a shocking 842 children who were attending its Emergency Department in 2018 were living in emergency accomodation, or didn't have a fixed address.

This means that there has been a 29 percent increase in the amount of patients who are being discharged into homelessness in Dublin, and one-quarter of the children were under one year old.

In 2017, the number of children discharged from ED who had no fixed address was 651.

The majority children last year presented with medical ailments such as chest infections, seizures, asthma, high temperatures and vomiting.

On the other side, 23 percent of children presented with trauma such as head lacerations, burns, self-harm and hand and arm injuries.

In the final three months of 2018 alone, 260 children attended Temple Street's Emergency Department without a fixed address.

Head Medical Social Worker at Temple Street, Anne-Marie Jones commented on the situation, condemning it as "shameful";

She said: "When these children leave our ED, they stay in temporary accommodation with cramped conditions and no appropriate cooking, washing or play facilities."

She added; "This results in accidents or traumas that wouldn’t normally happen if these families were housed in a family home.” 

Dr Ike Okafor, Emergency Medicine Consultant , meanwhile, argued that children's recovery is massively affected by their living situation.

Dr Okafor claims that; "There are children where you do what you can do in hospital, and then you hope they'll go home and recover."

"But these accommodations aren't conducive for recovery for some of the conditions – so they're not the ideal," he said.

He described cases of children undergoing surgery and then having nowhere to go from there, as well as incidents involving children being assaulted trying to find accommodation.

The most recent official homeless figures from November show there were 3,811 children in emergency accommodation that month.

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New guidelines of been released by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) to reflect the public audience's changing views on sexual content and violence.

Research shows that a surprising 95% of teenagers have been calling for stronger classification on media, with the youth especially worried about watching fictional scenarios which could realistically occur in their own lives.

The BBFC are implementing alterations which sees movies depicting rape and sexual violence as rated 15 rather than 12A.

Keira Knightley's famous period drama The Duchess, which was classified in the 12 category at the time of release, would now be considered as 15 under the new guidelines as a result of the rape scene.

In the study involving more than 10,000 people, 97% of parents as well as young people are asking for stricter guidelines for online content and tougher classification.

David Austin, BBFC chief executive, said: “Over the last five years the way we consume film and video has changed beyond all recognition. That’s why it’s so important that there is consistency between what people watch on and offline."

Austin continued; “The research shows that parents and teenagers want us to give them the information and guidance that they need to view what’s right for them."

“We are updating our standards around depictions of sexual violence and very strong sex references to reflect changes in public attitudes," he continued.

Since 2014, British views of sex have consistently transformed and progressed with the times. Audiences now want higher classifications for sexual content.

BBFC claim that “the language of pornography” and strong sexual references are also expected to gain an 18 certificate.

The BBFC maintain that audiences are more tolerant of violent content than other potentially troubling material, according to their research, which is worrying.

Austin added: “We’re here to listen to what people want, which is why they trust our age ratings. So it’s encouraging to know that we’ve been classifying content in line with what people want and expect when it comes to difficult themes around credible real-life scenarios."

“We also know that people are more comfortable with issues such as action violence," he concluded. The guidelines will be officially released on February 28.

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