HomeTagsPosts tagged with "Bookworm"

Bookworm

It’s been an incredible year for Irish writers. Some of the most heartwarming, hilarious and honest reads have been released this year, including Once, Twice Three Times an Aisling by Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen and Overcoming by Vicky Phelan with Naomi Linehan.

We have teamed up with the wonderful people at the An Post Irish Book Awards to give one bookworm the dream prize. We have six of the best Irish fiction books up for grabs and you’re in for a real treat. All of these books have been nominated for the National Book Tokens Popular Fiction Book of the Year category.

The books include:

Once, Twice, Three Times an Aisling – Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen (Gill Books)

Filter This – Sophie White (Hachette Ireland)

Postscript – Cecelia Ahern (HarperFiction)

When All is Said – Anne Griffin (Hodder & Stoughton)

Schmidt Happens – Ross O’Carroll-Kelly (Penguin Ireland)

Seven Letters – Sinéad Moriarty (Penguin Ireland)

To be in with a chance of winning this incredible prize then head over to our Instagram account here

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by SHEmazing! (@shemazingie) on

The An Post Irish Book Awards celebrate and promote Irish writing to the widest range of readers possible.

Each year it brings together a huge community passionate about books – readers, authors, booksellers, publishers and librarians – to recognise the very best of Irish writing talent across sixteen categories, including Novel of the Year, Children’s, Cookery, Crime Fiction, Popular Fiction, Nonfiction, Sports, Short Story, Poetry, Teen and Young Adult and Irish Language.

May the odds be ever in your favour.

Trending

Once in a while we are blessed with a book that transforms your life for the better and this year that book is Everyday Ubuntu by Desmond Tutu’s granddaughter, Mungi Ngomane.

This book will capture readers interested in ancient wisdom and personal development. It shares a warm, inspirational message of togetherness for a divided and fragmented world.

Ubuntu is an ancient South African philosophy that says, ‘I am only because you are.’ It is the belief that we are defined by our compassion and kindness towards others. By embracing Ubuntu it’s possible to overcome division in a world where the wise build bridges, not walls.

Exploring ideas of kindness and forgiveness, tolerance and the power of listening, Everyday Ubuntu shows how we can all benefit from embracing others. Including practical applications and mindful exercises, it is an inspirational guide to a more fulfilling life as part of the large family to which we all belong.

In Everyday Ubuntu you’ll discover 14 simple and engaging lessons with clear takeaways and reflections that will help us all to live better, together.

Read an extract of Everyday Ubuntu below:

1. Accept the situation. This is the way you’re feeling, so honour it – cry and release your emotions. Ubuntu tells us that we need to take care of ourselves and be honest about our feelings. This helps to identify why you’re feeling hopeless. Is it because of a recent upset? Or is it a long-term struggle? Whatever it is, naming the reasons for your feelings will help you to release them. 

2. Take action. Some call it ‘wallowing’ but hopelessness can easily feel like a spiral into which you’re sucked and out of which it is impossible to pull yourself. You feel lethargic, unmotivated and in despair. Listen to your internal dialogue. It might contain phrases such as, ‘but I can’t’, ‘there’s no point’ or ‘I’ve already tried’. The first step is turning those words around and changing every negative into a positive. Say these new phrases out loud – ‘I can’, ‘I won’t give up’ and ‘I’ll try again’ all send a powerful message to our subconscious. 

3. Live in the present moment. Do something to make yourself feel better physically, even if you’re struggling mentally – the two are linked. A long brisk walk, calling a positive friend, eating wholesome food. These are all small things we can do to help change our immediate concerns. Worrying is wishing for what you don’t want to happen, so don’t agonize over the future. Focus on the present. Do anything that takes you out of yourself, even if it’s just for a few moments. 

4. Write a gratitude list. Ubuntu shows us that we all have something for which to be grateful, so now is the time to examine the good stuff in detail. You might be thankful for your physical health, your family, caring friends, the delicious cup of coffee you’re drinking. Name the things you feel good about right now. It’s an exercise that will shift your mood, energetically and quickly. 

5. Set goals. If you’ve reached a place of desperate hopelessness, you need to put in work each day to overcome the feeling. Get going by setting yourself new goals, and begin with very small ones – incremental and easy-to-achieve steps. 

If you’ve lost your job, start by reaching out to trusted contacts for advice, then build up to looking at job adverts before applying for positions. If you’ve been ditched by a partner, give yourself time to grieve and talk things through with a counsellor or friend. Allow yourself space to heal before even thinking about dating again. If you’re in despair because you’ve gained weight, find a simple exercise app to inspire you, build up the amount of exercise you do every day, find a workout buddy, then look at food plans to help you make a bigger transformation. Small steps help hope to gather momentum. 

6. Find your faith. This could be a long-term goal that evolves over time. It doesn’t have to be a religious faith, but having faith in something you can trust is something everyone needs. It could be faith in your abilities or your choices. You could put your faith in going for a daily run to improve your mental health or in eating nutritious food so that you have energy for the day. 

Build some of these hopeful ideas into a new daily routine. They’ll bolster you and give you an inner strength and hope on which to rely when things become difficult.

Everyday Ubuntu by Mungi Ngomane is published by Penguin. You can order your copy here.

 

Trending

by

The summer will come to an end in a few weeks so it is time to make the most of all the free time and embrace your cultural side. The National Library of Ireland have an immense amount of events happening throughout August and you can’t miss out.

Check out the full programme below:

Guided tour: ‘Yeats: The Life and Works of William Butler Yeats’

Thursday, August 1 at 1pm

Explore the life and works of one of the great poets of the twentieth century at the NLI’s award-winning Yeats exhibition.

Free admission. All welcome. Booking not required. Group tours may be booked at: learning@nli.ie.

Related image

Guided tour: ‘Seamus Heaney: Listen Now Again’ exhibition

Tuesday, August 6, 13, 20, 27 at 1pm

Gain insight into the archival material on display, the work of one of Ireland’s best loved poets and the context and structure of the exhibition on this guided tour.

Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green (entry via Westmoreland Street)

Free admission. Booking required via Eventbrite or email heaneyexhibition@nli.ie.

Guided tour: ‘Seamus Heaney: Listen Now Again’ exhibition

Saturday, August 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31 at 1pm

Gain insight into the archival material on display, the work of one of Ireland’s best loved poets and the context and structure of the exhibition on this guided tour.

Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green (entry via Westmoreland Street)

Free admission. Booking required via Eventbrite or email heaneyexhibition@nli.ie.

Guided tour: ‘A Modern Eye: Helen Hooker O'Malley's Ireland’

Thursday, August 15 at 1pm

Understand an outsider’s fascination with Irish people and Irish life at this free tour of the NLI’s latest exhibition at the National Photographic Archive, Temple Bar.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. All welcome. Booking not required.

Guided tour: ‘The National Library's History & Heritage’

Saturday, August 17 at 1pm

Explore the National Library's rich architectural history and heritage on this free tour which includes a visit to its iconic Victorian reading room.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. All welcome. Booking not required.

Turas treoraithe: Stair agus Oidhreacht na Leabharlainne Náisiúnta

Monday, August 19 at 1pm

Tá fáilte romhat bheith i gcomhluadar Niamh Ní Riain ar thuras stair agus oidhreacht na Leabharlainne Náisiúnta.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. All welcome. Booking not required.

Research Workshop: Using the National Library

Monday, August 19 at 3pm

Receive advice and guidance on researching the rich and varied collections of the National Library. Suitable for first-time Library users. Places limited. Booking required.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. All welcome. Booking not required.

Heritage Week talk: Past & Present- Digital Collections at the NLI

Tuesday, August 20 at 1pm

Join Maria Ryan for a lunchtime talk and learn how the NLI protects and makes available Ireland’s digital heritage through digitisation, web archiving and born digital collecting.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. Booking not required.

Heritage Week Readings and Performance: Helen Hooker O'Malley's Ireland

Wednesday, August 21 at 1.05pm

Celebrate the work of American artist, Helen Hooker O'Malley with music and poetry readings and take in the exhibition of her photography presents an outsider’s fascination with Irish people and Irish life.

National Photographic Archive, Meeting House Square, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.

Free. Booking not required.

Image result for seamus heaney

Turas treoraithe: Taispeántas Yeats

Wednesday, August 21 at 6pm

Tá fáilte romhat bheith le Niamh Ní Riain ar thuras treoraithe, trí Ghaeilge, saor in aisce don taispeántas  'Yeats: The Life & Works of William Butler Yeats'.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. Booking not required.

Heritage Week Tour: ‘Seamus Heaney: Listen Now Again’

Thursday, August 22 at 11am

Take in a special National Heritage Week tour of our exhibition, Seamus Heaney: Listen Now Again and share in the story of one of Ireland’s greatest writers and most-loved figures.

Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green (entry via Westmoreland Street)

Free admission. Booking required via Eventbrite or email heaneyexhibition@nli.ie.

Heritage Week Talk: ‘Cooking the Books’

Thursday, August 22 at 1pm

Explore the recipe and cookery books held in the NLI’s collections with a display of some items in the Manuscripts Reading Room.

National Library of Ireland, 7-8 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 P638.

Free admission. Booking not required.

Lecture: ‘Heaney on the Border’

Friday, August 23 at 1pm

Join Roy Foster for a lecture on the development of Heaney's poem, 'Station Island' and its companion pieces, and the ways in which it is anticipatory of the writer's later life.

Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green (entry via Westmoreland Street)

Free. Booking required via Eventbrite or email heaneyexhibition@nli.ie.

Book club: Electric Light  by Seamus Heaney

Friday, August 30 at 1pm

Join in the discussion of this month's poetry collection Electric Light.

Bank of Ireland Cultural and Heritage Centre, College Green (entry via Westmoreland Street)

Free. Booking required via Eventbrite or email heaneyexhibition@nli.ie.

More information available at www.nli.ie.

Trending

We have gathered up our current favourite reads that you must add to your to-be-read list.

There's something for everyone whether you’re a fan of fiction or a lifestyle lover.

1: Essential Oils You Can’t Do Without by Daniele Festy (Eddison Books Ltd)

Fragrant essential oils work gently but surely. For a long time, they were the exclusive province of perfumers and played a somewhat anonymous role in the manufacture of cosmetics. More recently, they’ve come out of the wings to take centre stage, reminding us how to look after ourselves safely and effectively.

There are six key oils that will cover all your needs and Daniele Festy is here to tell you all about them and their benefits. Her book presents the six you can’t do without- tea tree, lemon, lavender,  peppermint, rosemary cineole and damask rose.

 

2: Dancing the Charleston by Jacqueline Wilson (Penguin)

Mona and her aunt live in a little cottage on the edge of the Somerset estate where her aunt sews dresses for the lady of the house. When Lady Somerset dies and a new member of the Somerset family inherits the house, things begin to change for Mona. She has never really fitted in anywhere, but the new atmosphere at the house offers opportunities for her to shine- and to find new friends. Dancing at fancy costume balls and trips to decadent 1920s London are wonderfully exciting- but new experiences sometimes bring revelations. Are there secrets in Mona’s past that she can’t dance away from?

Take a walk down memory lane and give this Jacqueline Wilson book a read. 

Image with no description

3: Hinch Yourself Happy by Mrs Hinch (Penguin)

The first book from Instagram sensation Mrs Hinch. Sophie Hinchcliffe, who is known to her- now over two million- followers as ‘Mrs Hinch’, has taken the nation by storm with her infectiously addictive charm and passionate belief that cleaning has the power to change your life.

She will turn your house into a home. Whether you’re a daily duster or looking for a monthly makeover, Hinch Yourself Happy offers the reader clever cleaning tips and shows you how to create not only a cleaner house but a calmer you- offering an antidote to the disorder and anxieties of daily life.

Image result for hinch yourself happy

4: Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Penguin)

This is no doubt one of the most talked about books of the year.

This book tells the tale of Daisy Jones and The Six, their rise to fame, their struggles and the reason they went their separate ways at the height of their fame.

Taylor Jenkins Reid shares their story through a series of interviews with the band members, their colleagues and families.

Trust me when I say you won’t be able to put this gripping and exciting book down once you start reading it. It is so perfectly written that you'll forget Daisy Jones and The Six are, in fact, a fictional band and you'll be hopelessly  looking them up on Spotify.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Reese’sBookClubxHelloSunshine (@reesesbookclubxhellosunshine) on

5: Constellations: Reflections from Life by Sinead Gleeson (Pan Macmillan)

We have been eager to read Sinead Gleeson’s collection of essays since it was published earlier this month.

The writer tells the story of a life in a body, as it goes through sickness, health, motherhood. She sheds a light on the reality of being a woman in Ireland in this daring collection of essays.

She writes about life in all it’s different, delightful and difficult stages, from birth to first love, pregnancy to motherhood, terrifying sickness, old age and loss to death itself.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Pan Macmillan (@panmacmillan) on

6: Things In Jars by Jess Kidd (Canongate)

Set in London in 1863, Things In Jars follows the journey of female detective Bridie Devine as she tackles her toughest case to date.

Christabel Berwick has been kidnapped. But Christabel is no ordinary child. She is not supposed to exist. As Bridie fights to recover the stolen child she enters a world of fanatical anatomists, crooked surgeons and mercenary showmen. Anomalies are in fashion, curiosities are the thing, and fortunes are won and lost in the name of entertainment.

The public love a spectacle and Christabel may well prove the most remarkable spectacle London has ever seen.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Canongate (@canongatebooks) on

 

 

 

 

Trending

Eason are delighted to launch ‘Sinéad and Rick’s Must Reads’ for the second year running with an exciting selection of titles chosen by author Sinéad Moriarty and broadcaster Rick O’Shea for Spring.

Throughout the year Sinéad and Rick will choose and review eight Must Read titles for the coming season (Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter), featuring an eclectic mix of Irish and international writers.

Books lovers Sinéad and Rick are back with a bang for 2019 and have picked some sure-to-be bestsellers as their Must Reads for Spring. The duo read, critique and review their chosen titles and give customers an authentic and honest insight into a range of exciting new Irish and international novels and non-fiction books.

Rick O’Shea, said; “The Sinead and Rick’s Must Reads series gives me a great excuse to choose and read a selection of books that I love and want other people to love too. We saw so many great books in the 2018 selection and the first instalment for 2019 includes some real surprises that I think Eason customers will love”.

Sinéad Moriarty added: “The books we’ve chosen for our first selection of Must Reads for 2019 range from the hilarious to the heart-rending and are perfect reads for this time of year. We’ve chosen books that suit everyone, from those who read to relax to those who read to learn more about the modern world. This selection really has something for everyone.”

 

This spring, ‘Sinéad and Rick’s Must Reads’ features eight exciting, inspirational and moving titles including:

Professor Chandra follows his Bliss by Rajeev Balasubramanyam

A book that is as quirky and charming as its title. Professor Chandra is obsessed with winning the Nobel Prize for economics that he feels he richly deserves. But when he finds out that once again, he has not won, he starts to fall apart. This is a tender, at times hilarious, look at life which is at once both funny and moving. If you loved The Rosie Project, then this book is definitely for you!

The Red Address Book by Sofia Lundberg

96 year old Doris knows she has not much time left and wants to make sure her grand-niece knows all about her colourful and difficult life before it’s too late. Using her address book where she has detailed all the names of the people who have meant the most to her, Doris relates the story of her life. A captivating portrayal of how the elderly have rich and fascinating histories and lives that we can and should learn from.

When All is Said by Anne Griffin

Maurice Hannigan is sitting at a hotel bar in his hometown. As the night wears on he raises a toast to each of five characters who have played important roles and helped shape him and his life. This is a beautiful, tender, heart-wrenching book about loss, grief and regret – a stunning read.

The Mercy Seat by Elizabeth Hartley Winthrop

Inspired by true events, this is the tale of Willie, an eighteen-year-old black man who is awaiting the death penalty for having raped a white girl. But as the book progresses, we begin to question whether he is actually guilty, or, if he was set up? Told from nine different points of view, the reader is drawn in from the very first page as each of the characters share their stories, and we gradually piece together the real truth.

The Last Ones Left Alive by Sarah Davis-Goff

Orpen has been raised by two women, her mother and her partner Maeve, on a remote island off the West coast. When Maeve is bitten by one of the ravenous beasts who now roam the country, Orpen has to set off with her, their dog, and a wheelbarrow to find civilisation before it’s too late. A cracking post-apocalyptic thriller, with elements of Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’.

How To Lose Your Country by Ece Temelkuran

Ece is a Turkish journalist, political commentator and author who lives in exile – here, she walks you through the seven steps of how a populist movement can take control of a country, starting with her home country and Hungary and then moving closer to home and looking at Brexit and Trump. An important, current and very readable book about the populist playbook and how it threatens to engulf us all.

If Only I Could Tell You by Hannah Beckerman

Audrey has two grown up daughters, both with children of their own, but both sides are estranged ever since a split in the family which happened years earlier causes deep and irreconcilable differences. As the plot unravels, and we get acquainted with each of the main characters, we begin to realise the terrible situations they’re all in as the stakes for each of them rapidly increase. A beautifully written and very impressive novel.

Daisy Jones And The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Billy and his band The Six are getting noticed in the late 60s and are starting to hit the big time. Daisy is an “It” girl who wants to sing her own songs. This is the story of their band’s meteoric rise to fame from the points of view of everyone who was there – and the reader has to decide who (or what!) they want to believe. An incredibly entertaining read – the movie rights have already been snapped up by Reese Witherspoon – well worth reading before it before it hits the big screen.

 To check out full reviews of ‘Sinéad and Rick’s Must Reads’ for spring, please go to www.easons.com/sineadandrick.

 

Trending

Self-help books have been growing in popularity over the past decade and we can’t help but wonder do they actually work?

The shelves of bookstores are now jampacked with titles about the best ways to improve your life; from diets that will make you happier to ways to cut out toxic people from your life.

It’s safe to say there isn’t a lack of advice out there, but do these books stay true to their promise?

Illustration: Lisk Feng

When it comes to Love For Imperfect Things, the answer is yes.

The second novel by Zen Buddhist Haemin Sunim is the one book you just need to add to your to-read list in 2019.

The uplifting and beautifully-illustrated book is full of nuggets of wisdom that you’ll carry with you long after you’ve finished reading.

You know that feeling when you curl up on the sofa with a cup of warm tea after a long, draining day at work? That’s the feeling you get when you read Love For Imperfect Things.

It lifts you up with positive yet honest advice that is actually easy to incorporate into your day-to-day life.

Each chapter is full of reassuring tales and pages of encouraging quotes that will help you through each day.

Love For Imperfect Things was my companion on dull train journeys to the office for the past week and I found that even reading a mere 10 pages helped boost my spirits on rainy mornings and gloomy evenings.

The words of Haemin Sunim were comforting and heartwarming. The stories he shares are personal which help you accept the advice he shares far easier than your average self-help book.

Love For Imperfect Things shares realistic advice that will truly help you accept the person you are instead of pressuring yourself to be the perfect, flawless person the world expects you to be.

The book doesn’t force you to take up eccentric hobbies or to try obscene diets, it simply encourages you to be kind to yourself. Something we can all admit we neglect at the best of times.

Illustration: Lisk Feng

It is a book you will turn to in times of doubt, worry and fear. It will give you the guidance and reassurance you desperately need on the good and bad days.

Love For Imperfect Things by Haemin Sunim is published by Penguin Life. Treat yourself to a copy for €12.99 from all good bookstores.

Feature Image: Haemin Sunim Instagram

Trending

We all recognise a part of ourselves in fictional female characters, whether that’s Bridget Jones and her goofy personality or Katniss Everdeen and her loyalty to her family and friends.

However, I don’t think us Irish women relate to anyone as much as Aisling, the protagonist in the best-selling book Oh My God, What a Complete Aisling.

Aisling’s story continues in the sequel The Importance of Being Aisling and reading the second instalment felt like I was reuniting with an old friend.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gill Books (@gillbooks) on

Her obsession with The Corrs, her lunchtime trip to Dunnes Stores to find a new ‘shumper’ and her determination to never miss a free hotel brekkie makes Aisling one of the most real female fictional characters.

After quite the emotional year things seem to be getting back on track for Aisling. She’s been enjoying many a glass of Pinot Greej with Sadhbh and co., she’s become accustomed to Dublin’s brunch addiction and she's even rekindled her romance with John.

However, she is still struggling to deal with the loss of her dear Daddy as Aisling, Mammy and her brother Paul are facing their first Christmas without him.

Anyone who has lost a family member knows just how hard that first Christmas is. Ever the positive person, Aisling seeks joy in the little things like Auntie Shelia’s famous stuffing and doing the ‘Big Shop’ in the new Aldi with Mammy, but that heartache is still there, which makes this book that little bit more personable.

Us Irish aren’t known for expressing our feelings and this is perfectly portrayed in the way Aisling and her family deal with Christmas without Daddy. The secret tears and unfulfilled traditions are oh so relatable for many readers.

What I adore most about Aisling is her ability to see the light in even the darkest of moments. Her “Ah sure, it’ll be grand” attitude is infectious in this tale and part of me felt proud of her for continuing on despite the hurdles life throws at her.

When things at PensionsPlus go awry, Aisling has no choice but to abandon her life in Dublin. She returns home to Mammy and That Bloody Cat, but before she knows it she's planning an escape route when life in Ballygobbard is too much to handle.

Aisling jets off to Las Vegas with Majella and Sadhbh in tow and the trip gives her the confidence boost that shows Aisling she’s capable of a hell of a lot more than she ever gave herself credit for.

The Importance of Being Aisling is full or warmth and that unique Irish wit. It'll be a comfort to you on those dreary Autumn evenings and your best companion on your commute to work

The Importance Of Being Aisling: Country Roads, Take Her Home by Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen is published by Gill Books.

You can pick up your very own copy here.

Trending

Happy Book Lovers Day, fellow bookworms. It’s one of the greatest days of the year where we can gush about our literary loves even more than we usually do.

There are so many things I wanted to write about for this week’s book piece, from my all time favourite books to reasons why you should read more.

However, I decided to pen a love letter to the literary world and talk about why being a bookworm is one of the most wonderful things.

Without further ado, here are The Perks of Being a Bookworm:

Sense of comfort:

Nothing warms my heart more than curling up in my room, switching my fairy lights on and reading a book. There’s something so soothing about taking a break from the world and diving into a different place, meeting new people and learning about their lives all from the comfort of your own reading zone, whether that’s your bedroom, a local cafe or your neighbourhood library. Reading offers the greatest sense of comfort and helps you escape the dull realities of everyday life.

Visiting bookshops:

Bookshops are a safe haven for so many people. They offer a sense of serenity from the hectic hustle and bustle of the city. I could easily spend hours scouring the shelves in dinky little bookshops. The peace and tranquility the stores offer also help me when I’m feeling anxious. They act as a safe place when the city can seem a tad daunting. They may be my favourite place to visit, but I’m afraid I can’t say the same for my bank account because I never fail to leave without purchasing at least one book, it’s impossible.

The perfect company:

It’s sad but true, people are feeling lonelier than ever before. Loneliness is affecting so many people all around the world for a variety of reasons. Whether it’s something as simple as not having enough time to socialise or a deeper reason like anxiety preventing you from leaving the house. Luckily, books can be a huge comfort if you are feeling pretty lonesome. You could delve into a timeless classic like Frankenstein and learn about Victor Frankenstein and his complicated mind, or perhaps unwind with the beautiful words of Rupi Kaur’s poetry in Milk and Honey.

Characters like Bridget Jones,Tracy Beaker, Matilda Wormwood and Katniss Everdeen quickly became part of my world throughout some of the dullest times in my life, and you’ll certainly feel comforted by the characters amongst the pages of whatever book you pick up.

“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counsellors, and the most patient of teachers" – Charles William Eliot.

Trending

I wandered into one of my favourite bookstores on Friday and within minutes I had three books in my arms. I continued to scour the shelves despite the stack of books I was ready to buy.

It’s impossible for me to leave a bookshop empty handed. I am the ultimate bookworm and can’t just browse through the shelves.

There’s always a new release that catches my eye or a classic tale that I’ve been meaning to read forever.

I easily could’ve spent a small fortune in that bookshop because there are dozens of incredible new stories out at the moment.

If you’re on the hunt for a new read then look no further. I’ll be splurging on the following books this month and you should too. They’re just too good to leave on the shelves.

The Weight of a Thousand Feathers by Brian Conoghan:

I think it’s important to remember that anyone can read YA books. We should never underestimate these tales just because they’re aimed at young adults. In my opinion, the genre is one of the strongest and most moving. Some of my favourite books hail from the YA section and will continue to do so for many years to come. I spotted The Weight of a Thousand Feathers in store thanks to the striking cover, but what really peaked my interest was the question the book explores- what lengths will we go to for the people we love?

Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig:

I have oodles of respect for author Matt Haig and his ability to discuss mental health disorders in such an honest way. His book Reasons To Stay Alive holds a very special place in my heart, so I was thrilled to see his latest release sitting on the best-sellers shelf this week. Notes on a Nervous Planet focuses on how to be happy on a planet that makes us feel alone, anxious and nervous. Matt Haig looks into the public’s desire to constantly be connected to the digital world and the impact it is having on our mental health.

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay:

My best friend purchased this book at the end of our trip to Scotland and flew through it by the time we touched down in Dublin airport. I’m a Grey’s Anatomy addict, so anything medical related fascinates me (I blame McSteamy and McDreamy) so this book soared to the top of my books to-buy list. Adam Kay gives readers a brutally honest look at life as a junior doctor and what life is really like on and off the hospital ward.

Trending

You’ll be surprised by the number of movies that have actually been inspired by books, from Me Before You to Trainspotting. Some of the greatest big screen hits have been adapted from novels, and manage to do the book justice more often than not.

However, there’s something special about reading the story before seeing it unfold on the big screen. 

What I love about book to film adaptations is putting a face to the characters you’ve loved for so long. Yes, you may know how the film is going to end, but seeing those characters come to life in the cinema is such a special feeling. It also helps you connect with them more, because they’re no longer just descriptions on a page.

The familiarity of the story, the plot and the characters can also be a huge source of comfort for bookworms when watching their beloved tales on the big screen.

Today, I wanted to recommend a book that left me in floods of tears, but one I hold very close to my heart. It’s due to be made into a film in 2019, starring Elle Fanning, and you must read it before it’s cinematic release.

All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven:

What can I say about this book other than WOW. The young adult novel by the incredible Jennifer Niven is without a doubt one of the greatest books I’ve read. The way Jennifer writes about bipolar disorder, the importance of friendship and the fear of being judged is so striking.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

All The Bright Places follows the lives of Theodore Finch and Violet Markey. Theodore aka Finch is completely fascinated with death. Suicide is always on his mind, but little things always stop him from killing himself.

Violet Markey is struggling with the untimely death of her sister. She spends her days daydreaming about the future and aches to escape her hometown so she can start her life all over again.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

Violet and Finch meet on top of the ledge of the school’s bell tower. They quickly develop a friendship that finally lets them breathe for the first time and be who they’ve always wanted to be.

The pair decide to team up for a school project to discover the natural wonders’ of Indiana, but their wanderings teach them more about one another than their hometown.

Violet learns how to live in the moment through her friendship with Finch, but can her friendship keep him alive?

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

This novel will take hold of your heart from the very first page. The friendship between Finch and Violet is both mesmerising and heartbreaking. The constant discussion of mental health and suicide throughout this young adult novel is heavy, but necessary.

Author Jennifer Niven is in the pre-production stages of the movie, and is thankfully looking after the script.

 

A post shared by Jennifer Niven (@jenniferniven) on

Elle Fanning has been cast as Violet, and the producers have found their Finch. Harry Styles, Charlie Heaton and Cole Sprouse have all been rumoured to be playing Finch, so keep your eyes peeled, but in the meantime read this glorious novel, and make sure you have plenty of tissues beside you.

All The Bright Places is published by Penguin Books Ltd and is available to buy here.

Feature image: Jennifer Nivan Instagram

Trending

Summer is the perfect time to drag yourself out of a reading slump. I know how easy it is to give up on the book you’re reading and waste hours away watching Netflix. There have been many times when I’m curled up on my bed, with an episode of Queer Eye playing on my laptop, when all of a sudden I spot the abandoned book at the end of my bed.

I am the biggest bookworm, but I have to admit there have been days where I toss my book aside so I can binge watch a new medical drama or re-watch Gossip Girl for the thousandth time. However, my latest read has dragged me out of that lazy reading slump.

I picked up a copy of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society from my local charity shop for a mere €1. I’ve heard wonderful things about the historical novel, and once I discovered that it was an epistolary novel I knew it was going to be such an enjoyable read.

An epistolary novel is written as a series of documents, most commonly letters, which makes the reading experience that little bit easier as it feels more personal.

The story is set during 1946 where we meet Juliet Ashton, an accomplished writer. In the past, the writer has penned a book full of comedic columns that she wrote during the second world war under the pseudonym, Izzy Bickerstaff.

Juliet realises that it’s time to write a story under her own name and her creativity sparks when she receives a random letter from Dawsey Adams, a member of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, which began as a cover for residents who broke curfew during the German occupation of Guernsey.

Juliet realises that this is a story the world needs to know and starts writing to the rest of the society.

After exchanging letters with the society for some time, Juliet decides to head to Guernsey to conduct research for her book, but her life will change drastically when she steps foot on Guernsey.

What you’ll love the most about this book is how the characters feel like old friends. The authors reveal so much about everyone in the novel in a subtle but powerful way.

Plus, the book is packed with information about World War II so history buffs will love it. There are times when details about the occupation of Guernsey can be a tad overwhelming, but they only add to the story.

The characters, the plot and the style of the book are a joy, but what really gets you is the lesson it teaches you.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society teaches us about the importance of standing up for others no matter what.

One character, in particular, Elizabeth McKenna, will show you that loyalty means everything, especially in times of distress. She showed me that you should never let anything or anyone strip you of your character, even in the darkest and most dangerous circumstances.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society published by Dial Press is available here.

Trending

Holly Bourne captured the hearts of millions of young women with her gripping and honest YA novels. The writer is about to release her first adult novel and we are unbelievably excited about it.

How Do You Like Me Now? has been described as today’s answer to Bridget Jones. The story follows best-selling author Tori Bailey, whose self-help memoir has become a bible for women across the globe.

The author’s wise words may be worshipped by her readers, but Tori hasn’t been entirely honest with them. She is in an unhappy relationship and as friend after friend settles down, she worries that she will be left behind.

She’s about to turn thirty and the fear is slowly creeping in. “Turning thirty is like playing musical chairs. The music stops, and everyone just marries whoever they happen to be sitting on.”

Will Tori find the courage to follow her own path, or will she give into the pressures of society?

Holly’s debut adult novel is raw and a true breath of fresh air. Her brutally honest words about the pressure to settle down is a welcome tale in today’s society.

The pressures we face to achieve x,y and z by a certain age need to be left in the past. This refreshing and witty book about the reality of life in your thirties is a must-read for every woman out there.

Make sure to treat yourself to a copy of How Do You Like Me Now? on June 14.

How Do You Like Me Now? is published by Hodder & Stoughton and is available for pre-order here
 

Trending