HomeTagsPosts tagged with "referendum"

referendum

Not many of our peers can say that we have read the full Irish Constitution, and yet it’s the most important political document in a country’s legislature.

Following the removal of the article regarding blasphemy, and of course the 8th Amendment, it’s time to turn back to the Irish Constitution, and examine what is left to be done to bring this document straight into the 21st century.

To start, the sexism, elitism and reductionist standards are alien to modern life, and the Irish people deserve a legal document which accurately represents all of its citizens.

In case we have forgotten from secondary school political history classes, Bunreacht na hÉireann was drafted way back in 1937, by the hugely conservative Éamon de Valera, who perfectly represented the conservative Catholic Church-state environment of the era.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Midas Productions (@midas.productions) on

By writing a new Constitution, de Valera embarked upon a very risky political strategy considering Irish political life at the time was hugely volatile. It replaced the Irish Free State Constitution of 1922, and therefore erased Article 3 which guaranteed “discrimination without distinction of sex.

He revitalised his dream of Catholic women serving good, Catholic men in the home. Religious leaders also had a far-too-big input into the Constitution, including men who are now recognised as protecting child abusers.

Now, of course the entire religious community of Ireland weren't involved in abuse scandals, but it's important to note that a large group of them were, and were protected for years to the detriment of abuse survivors.

The Constitution has caused many a controversy, among them is the X case, where a young woman who was raped was denied the right to travel to the UK for an abortion. This was changed officially in 1992, as the 14th Amendment.

The right to divorce was only ratified in the mid-1990s, and even then partners had to be officially separated for four years. An annulment was next to impossible to get, even for those who were stuck in situations of abuse.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by P A U L A (@pollyjohughes) on

The protection for the life of the unborn still causes turbulence, seeing as it dramatically impedes female healthcare even outside of reproduction.

The legislation repealing the 8th has yet to come into practice, and is showing no sign of entering the healthcare system anytime soon despite it's valuable victory which took in 66 per cent of votes.

The right for members of the LGBQ+ community to marry was only passed in 2015. You cannot run for President until you turn 35, which would have ruled out some of Ireland’s major political candidates in the 1930s.

As recently as 2015, a shocking 73.1 per cent of the population voted against reducing the age to 21. Irish law appears to believe that age brings wisdom, rather than actual experience.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Daniel Anderson (@wordmonkey) on

Many members of Irish society struggle with the union of the Catholic religion with the Constitution. It’s completely saturated with it. The opening lines to this day read:

“In the Name of the Most Holy Trinity, from Whom is all authority and to Whom, as our final end, all actions both of men and States must be referred, We, the people of Éire, Humbly acknowledging all our obligations to our Divine Lord, Jesus Christ.”

The oath sworn by the President of Ireland is “under almighty God.”

Article 44 on religion enshrines freedom of worship, but also notes that “The State acknowledges that the homage of public worship is due to Almighty God. It shall hold His Name in reverence, and shall respect and honour religion.”

So there’s not much room for expansion there, to say the least.

I mean, seriously? Four million inhabitants on the island, and the Constitution fails to separate Church and State, fails to acknowledge that there is another religion besides Catholicism, and other nuanced beliefs and practices.

Ireland is a diverse place, an Emerald Isle of nationalities and cultures, yet this piece of paper essentially only benefits elite, Catholic men in upper class positions. Like Éamon De Valera. Who had ZERO LAW EXPERIENCE.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Legend.efsaneler (@legend.efsaneler) on

Éamon De Valera cast a shadow over Irish women when he drafted it by ignoring pleas from Irish women’s councils to aid in writing the charter.

One of the most intensely problematic, not to mention out-dated articles is 41.2 the infamous ‘women’s place in the home’ section of the Constitution. By now there are zero doubts as to the sexism surrounding the enshrined words.

It reads as follows:

In particular, the State recognises that by her life within the home, woman gives to the State a support without which the common good cannot be achieved.

The State shall, therefore, endeavour to ensure that mothers shall not be obliged by economic necessity to engage in labour to the neglect of their duties in the home.”

This essentially claims that women are needed to carry out their housework duties and care for children so that the real work (by men) can be carried out elsewhere, i.e. running the damn country. The duties of the home are elevated far above labour outside of domesticity.

Image: Oireachtas

Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan says that the issue of Article 41.2 is primarily one of gender equality, and it’s next to impossible to disagree with him. The article limits the role of women entirely, and completely rejects the notion of men as carers and fathers, which is also unfair.

Men must take responsibility as carers of those who are vulnerable in society, not simply children. The elderly, disabled people, sick relatives and friends are all part of this category, which places most of the burden on women alone for their seemingly ‘nurturing qualities’.

The contention surrounding the article is whether or not to replace it with an alternative, or just delete it altogether. We’re thinking… DELETE.

The emotional and difficult referendum on the 8th amendment has had a clear impact on Irish society, especially on Irish women, who have recognised the inequality which still plagues our country, such as sexual assault and violence, discrimination and unequal pay.

The Constitution Bill (38th Amendment) must make its way through both houses of the Oireachtas before the Irish people can have their say on Article 41.2 via a referendum.

Independent TD Clare Daly said in response to Charlie Flanagan that she “feels like laughing, to think that you see yourself as a champion of gender equality given some of the decisions of your government.”

Image: Oireachtas

Another Independent representative Mick Wallace added his own negative comments to the pile:

“I find it interesting that you speak of gender equality in the workplace when the greatest barrier to that equality is the cost of childcare and your government has done bugger all about it.”

Ireland has the second highest-price of childcare in the OECD, meaning that it is still mostly women who struggle to return to work following pregnancy as the costs of childcare make the situation impossible.

Orla O’Connor, acting Director of the National Women’s Council of Ireland, later added that Article 41.2 “has not supported the home and family, and in our opinion has diminished the position of women” in Irish society.

Dr Laura Cahillane of the University of Limerick’s school of law described the Article as “an embarrassment”, as well as “effectively useless in law”.

A Constitution is meant to embody the moral and legal aspirations of an entire country and it’s individual citizens, we shouldn’t forget this. Women have the most to gain from changes to the Constitution.

All of the civic service committee members which Éamon de Valera employed in order to help him draft the document were men.

Archbishop of Dublin John Charles McQuaid as well as the head of the Supreme Court were two major influences, both male. Only three women were TDs during this time, and none of them said a word during the Dáil debate on the matter.

Essentially, we aren’t part of this document, and this document isn’t part of us. We make up half of this population, and yet not a single word of the parchment portrays the female experience.

Trending

On Friday, we took to the polling stations after months of canvassing, discussing and marching.

The Irish people voted to repeal the 8th amendment to the constitution, in a landslide victory.

It was, of course, an emotional weekend for many – as Ireland moves forward into a brighter and more compassionate future. 

Twitter has been awash with kind words, uplifting messages and stories that would warm even the coldest of hearts.

Here are some of our favourite responses to the decision to repeal the 8th amendment (finally!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trending

Following yesterday's result which saw Ireland vote overwhelmingly in favour of repealing the Eighth Amendment, many politicians are calling for Northern Ireland's abortion laws to be reformed. 

Speaking to Sky News, Labour's Jonathan Ashworth declared that women in the North "should have the same right" as women living in the Republic of Ireland. 

As it stands, terminations are only available under very narrow circumstances, forcing thousands of women to seek medical care elsewhere in the UK. 

Theresa May is now facing calls to reform the laws in Northern Ireland, acting in the absence of devolved administration. 

However, any changes to the law will likely be challenged by the Democratic Unionist Party's 10 MPs who are strongly opposed to any reform. 

Trending

The parents of the late Savita Halappanavar have thanked the people of Ireland after yesterday's historic result, which saw 66.4% vote in favour of repealing the Eighth Amendment. 

Speaking at their family home in south west India, her father, Ananappa Yalagi, said he has "no words to express his gratitude to the people of Ireland."

Savita died of sepsis in a hospital in Galway in 2012, after she was denied an abortion because Ireland was a "Catholic country."

Mr Yalagi acknowledged the struggle that has faced Irish women and suggested that the new law is named after his daughter.

“I want to thank you so much. I want to say ‘Thank you’ to our brothers and sisters in Ireland for voting Yes. It is very important. There has been really a lot, too much struggle for the Irish ladies,” he said. 

“We are really, really happy. We have one last request, that the new law, that it is called ‘Savita’s law’. It should be named for her.”

Trending

Over the past 15 hours, 3.3 million Irish citizens had the opportunity to vote in the referendum to repeal or maintain the 8th amendment. 

As of 10pm, the polls are closed, and everyone has cast their vote in the ballot box to be counted tomorrow. 

Early reports showed that this referendum has had an exceptionally high voter turn out – here's what some of the voters had to say on this historic day:

 

Trending

With 6,000 polling stations open all over the country from 7am this morning, the referendum to repeal or maintain the 8th amendment to the constitution  is in full swing. 

Constituencies are reporting an exceptionally high voter turnout in the first hours of the polls being open. 

3.3 million citizens are registered to vote in this referendum.

Dublin North Central has seen a 30% turnout by noon, according to The Irish Times.

Some areas of Sligo saw an almost 25% voter turnout by noon. 

In Cork, 16.2% turned out at noon, compared to 13.3% at the same time for the General Election in 2016, 'which is unusual for a referendum,' according to Breaking News.

'Early indications are that turnout across the country is quite strong,' Orla O’Connor, Campaign Co-Director at Together For Yes said.

'However we know there are certain pockets where turnout is a bit slower, so we would encourage voters in these areas to talk to their friends, family members and work colleagues, and make sure they vote before the deadline of 10pm.'

Trending

Abortion – to some, a dirty word, and to others, a medical tool that allows us to establish full autonomy over our bodies as women. 

As Ireland prepares to lay their heads to rest for the final time before voting in the referendum to repeal or maintain the 8th amendment to the constitution tomorrow, some will sleep soundly, assured of their vote either way. 

Others among us will have a restless night, still undecided on which box to apply that all-powerful X to come morning. Those who won't sleep at all are the individuals who have been impacted by the constraints of the amendment, as many wonder what judgement their own country will lay upon them in the ballot box. 

 

A post shared by Repeal Project (@repealproject) on

In 1983, when the amendment was added, I didn't exist, and had no say on a constitutional restriction that affects me every day. My own mother was barely old enough to vote at the time of the previous referendum, but voted against it's installation in our constitution. At the time, the amendment was passed, and we were granted the restrictive laws we have today. 

A decade after she placed her vote in the ballot box supporting the rights of Irish women, she was lucky enough to have an uncomplicated pregnancy, unlike many women, and gave birth to me. 

Tomorrow, we will go to our polling station together, and I will see my mum cast her vote on this issue for the second time, a repeating of her personal history. Except this time, my ballot will go in the box after hers, and if the opinion polls are to be believed, she will finally see the result she longed for 35 years ago. 

She will cast her vote once again in the hope of a changed system for her daughters, her sisters, her friends, and anyone who could be impacted by the 8th. 

 

A post shared by Together for Yes (@together4yes) on

In 2016, I heard the first whispers of the movement to repeal the 8th amendment. I had always been pro-choice from the moment I was capable of grasping the concept, after seeing teenage pregnancies in my secondary school, and having personally known girls to have struggled with the most secret, stigmatised pain of a crisis pregnancy in a Catholic secondary school. 

An acquaintance of my 15-year-old-self drunkenly confided in me one night, as we walked through the fields of our rural town, that she had experienced an unwanted pregnancy. 

When I asked her, in my idiotic, naive way of the time, why she didn't look pregnant, she broke down, dropping to the grass of the street lamp-lit field, and told me that she had induced a miscarriage. I will not go into the details here out of respect for her privacy. I felt appalled at the time, not because of her actions of desperation, but because I realised in that moment that we existed in a suspended reality of outdated 'morals' and laws. 

Women who engage in sexual activity are punished with an ultimatum. Keep your 'mistake' or be banished to another country where they will deal 'with the likes of you,' a phrase that was used against my acquaintance by her student guidance counsellor when she brought her crisis to him.  

 

A post shared by Sarah Magliocco (@sarahmagliocco) on

As a teenager, who was less abashed than my friends, I would buy condoms and, in dangerous moments, pregnancy tests for others, who simply could not walk up to the Boots counter with those 'shameful' products in their hands. Some of my friends couldn't bear to buy them themselves, just from sheer embarrassment, or fear that someone they knew would see them and judge them. I would stroll in, my friend's crumpled €10 notes in my hands and secure the goods on their behalf.

When I got to college, my practice was put to good use when it was my own loose change I handed over the counter, knees knocking together, as I requested a test in the pharmacy.

The test was taken with shaky hands in the secrecy of a college dorm bathroom. Ragged breathing slowed as the second line on the test failed to appear and I knew I wasn't pregnant, but the entire time I thought I might be, all I could think over and over was 'I cannot afford to travel.' 

I laughed the very next day when my late period arrived, and my housemate and I celebrated with a 'you're not pregnant' party – because at the time there would have been no other option that was right for me but to have an abortion. Others have made a different choice, children themselves, and not regretted it, but that would not have been my choice. 

However, the struggles I would have dealt with to secure that medical option would have been unimaginable. 

 

A post shared by Repeal Project (@repealproject) on

Ireland has a historically complex relationship with the impurity or sex and the anticipated chastity of 'good Catholic women.' 

Even in a recent Garda rape investigation, the case was described as a  'terrible rape on a decent girl.' What does this casual turn of phrase mean exactly? What does a 'decent girl' entail? A pure woman? A woman who could never be perceived as 'asking for it?' Would the terminology and empathy level be different if she wasn't seen as a 'decent' girl? 

Ireland is one of the few countries in the world where Catholic guilt is still deeply rooted, but like a festering rot, it manifests itself in the worst ways.

There are few No arguments that do not rely heavily on 'morals,' and a quick Google will leave you with evidence of religious associations on that side of the campaign. From mass goers being told they will no longer be welcome in the congregation if they vote Yes, to statues of Mary being carted around during Save the 8th marches, the societal connection of church and state is clear. 

 

A post shared by Together for Yes (@together4yes) on

But the fact of the matter is, sex happens. Abortion happens, in this country and in clinics abroad who are now so accustomed to seeing Irish addresses on the appointment system they don't bat an eyelid. 

Abortion is a reality, but our country chooses to sweep it under the rug. All this scaremongering about 'floodgates opening' and '55 million babies being killed' is complete fallacy. When the morning after pill was introduced, pharmacies weren't seeing queues of hundreds banging down their doors the next morning looking for their pills. 

Women will not be using abortion as 'contraception' or normalising or minimising the seriousness of these medical tools. We won't be knocking back abortion pills over brunch with the gals thinking it's gas. Trust us. 

'We have moved on from dropping pregnant women at the laundries, and as a society we need to move on from dropping them at the departure gates, too,' said Gerry Edwards, at the launch of the Together for Yes campaign, and I could not agree more.  

Not only do these laws and social stigmas seek to belittle the bodily autonomy of women, but in doing so force women who are carrying complicated pregnancies, ones which could end in their own deaths or will definitely end in the deaths of their unborn, to continue to term – so long as there is a heartbeat. Yes, we now have the amendment that allows for legal abortion in cases of direct negative impact on the health of the mother, but we have all heard the stories from real women and couples about the lack of compassion and appalling medical conditions they are faced with still. If I can't convince you of this, the In Her Shoes Facebook page certainly will. 

 

A post shared by Sarah Magliocco (@sarahmagliocco) on

I have marched. I have tweeted. I have used my words to express my thoughts. I have donated. I have rallied. I have canvassed. I have volunteered. I have changed the minds of some no voters and been screamed at by others. 

When I look at the faces of my little sisters, who are too young to have their say, I hope for a safer future for them and their children.

When I accompany my mum to the polling station, I stand behind her in 2018 and in 1983. 

Tomorrow, I will vote Yes to repeal the 8th amendment because I believe in choice. For me, for the women who came before me, and the women who come after me.

Trending

The final countdown to the referendum to Repeal the 8th Amendment to the constitution is on, with just three sleeps to go before Ireland gets the opportunity to maintain or do away with the legislation which prevents women from legally acquiring abortion healthcare on Irish soil. 

If you are planning to vote in the upcoming referendum (which we encourage everyone to do so) then there are a few things to keep in mind before your stroll, drive or public transport commute to your polling station. 

The polling stations are open from 7am to 10pm so make the time to get down there before or after work, or during lunch time. 

 

A post shared by Together for Yes (@together4yes) on

First up – do not wear a Repeal or Save the 8th jumper, or any clothing, badges or accessories with the words yes or no on them.  

Clothing with campaign slogans could be seen as canvassing, and canvassing at a polling station is considered an offence. 

It's up to the discretion of the presiding polling station officer to decide if your jumper or badge is 'canvassing' but just to be safe, leave them at home. 

Next do not forget your polling card, as having your allotted card with you on the day speeds up your check-in process while also allowing you to vote. 

Photography by Saibh Egan | Galway Pro-Choice members at the Abortion Rights Campaign

If you don't have a polling card, a passport, a drivers license, a student ID containing a photograph (student travel cards not accepted) or a public services card will suffice. Age Cards are not listed as accepted. 

Bring a form of the above ID even if you have a polling card, as there is a chance you will be asked.

Don't take any pictures in the polling station, and DEFINITELY don't take any images inside the booth, of either you or your vote. 

As for the vote itself, make sure it gets stamped by polling station staff. 

 

A post shared by #savethe8th (@savethe8th) on

The question will read: 'Do you approve of the proposal to amend the Constitution contained in the undermentioned Bill?'

Put an X in the box for Yes or No and don't doodle on the paper or write any messages. There should be two pen strokes on that paper making up your X and that is is, or you risk spoiling your vote. 

And just put and X to indicate your vote, not a tick and don't colour in the box you want. 

If you make an honest mistake, you can ask for a new ballot slip as long as you haven't already put it in the ballot box. 

Show the back of your ballot paper to the local [polling official, fold it in half, and place it into the sealed ballot box. Job done. 

You can take your selfie in your campaign merch when you get home and share words of encouragement to others online about how they need to get out and vote that day. 

The day after the vote, the ballot boxes will be opened and counted. 

Feature image: Photography by Saibh Egan | Galway Pro-Choice members at the Abortion Rights Campaign

Trending

by

Cillian Murphy has been an active advocate for a 'Yes' vote in the upcoming abortion referendum, lending his voice to various campaigns supporting the repeal of the Eighth Amendment. 

And now, the Peaky Blinders star has given one final salute to the Yes side in the form of a delicious chocolate cake. 

As a way of thanking campaigners for all their hard work, Cillian sent the good folk over at Together for Yes a well-deserved treat. 

A tweet on the Together for Yes Twitter page read: ''Cillian Murphy sent us in cake! Fantastic to have support from men around the country to will stand with us and vote YES on Friday May 25th''.

The cake was accompanied by a hand-written note signed by the man himself.  

 ''Thank you all so much for your hard work on the Yes campaign," it read. 

''Together for change, for equality, for love. Together for Yes! Best wishes, Cillian Murphy''.

What an absolute gent! 

Trending

Leo Varadkar has been vocal in his support for repealing the 8th amendment in recant months. 

The Taoiseach uploaded a video to his Facebook page outlining ehy he will be voting Yes this Friday, and encouraging others to do the same. 

'When the 8th Amendment was put into our constitution back in  1983, that's 35 years ago, people believed that it would prevent abortion – but of course, it hasn't'

'It's just forced nearly 200,000 women to go overseas to end their pregnancies. We now have a lot of women, in fact two or three every day, who import abortion pills illegally over the internet, and end their pregnancies in their own home.'

'My views on abortion and on this difficult topic have changed over time.'

'Particularly during my time as Minister for Health, I became aware on occasion of some really tragic and really difficult cases.'

'Some people are worried that if they vote Yes, abortion will become too readily available in Ireland, that the new system will be too liberal – I want to assure you that that's not the plan.' 

Highlighting the logistics of a Yes majority vote, Varadkar noted that there will be a 72 hour waiting period for women seeking abortion.

'In the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, it will be the woman's decision as to whether she wants to go ahead with the pregnancy or not, and her doctor will be able to give her advice on alternative options or counselling.'

He went on to assure the public that after 12 weeks, there will only be access to abortion when the mother's life or health is at risk, or where the baby will not survive after birth, which must be confirmed by two separate specialist doctors.

'If you're still undecided, I'd ask you to put yourself in the shoes of a woman facing a crisis pregnancy. Perhaps she has been raped and doesn't feel that she can continue through with the pregnancy. Perhaps she's a child herself. If you vote No, nothing can change, and things will persist as they are now where women have to travel abroad to get the care that they need.'

Varadkar went on to highlight that he will be voting Yes opn May 25th for a more compassionate Ireland, 'one in which we don't sweep our problems under the carpet anymore.'

 

Trending

By Amy Donohoe

I believe that the eighth amendment needs to be repealed as Ireland imposed shame and abuse on women for years.

Women were stripped of their human right and treated as second class citizens.

Today, they still don’t have full control of their bodies. The Irish Constitution displays an outdated attitude towards women. Article 41.2 states that “by her life within the home, woman gives to the State a support without which the common good cannot be achieved.” and “mothers shall not be obliged by economic necessity to engage in labour to the neglect of their duties in the home.”

 

A post shared by Together for Yes (@together4yes) on

Archbishop McQuaid played a part in writing the Constitution and he was obsessed with controlling women. He didn’t agree with the introduction of tampons in 1944 especially for 'unmarried women'.

He also opposed health care for women in case women might be informed about contraception and sexual health.It wasn’t until 1985 that condoms were allowed to be sold to people over 18 without having to present a prescription.

I don’t believe in abortion, but I believe in choice. I believe that every woman should have a say on their own body and that they shouldn’t be dominated by the church and our outdated constitution.

Women need good healthcare. We export our problems overseas instead of caring for them at home with respect and compassion.

 

A post shared by #savethe8th (@savethe8th) on

Last weekend I went to an anniversary mass, but instead of praying for that person, the priest stood up and began to preach about his opinion on the eighth amendment as if he was superior to the rest of us.

I felt paralysed, I wanted to leave but if I did leave I would’ve been judged by the neighbours and shamed my family.

I believe in God but I don’t believe in the Irish Catholic Church and I don’t believe it was fair that the priest indirectly told people how to vote.

 

A post shared by Together for Yes (@together4yes) on  

Our country used to drop our pregnant women and girls off at the gates of institutions that hid them from the nosey neighbours and the church. Our girlfriends, wives, daughters, sisters and mothers are dropped to the departure gates at Dublin Airport.

They are forced to travel to other countries to access basic healthcare services and we deny them necessary aftercare when they return. They are forced to order illegal abortion pills online.

If you vote no this will still happen, but if you vote yes we will be able to give women the healthcare they need.

It's time to trust women to make the right to make decisions that are right for them and their families. The eighth amendment currently gives the unborn an equal right to life as the mother, which prohibits abortion in almost all cases.

If we vote yes we are voting for “provision made by law for the regulation of termination of pregnancy.”

Abortion will be accessible within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.

 

A post shared by #savethe8th (@savethe8th) on

The medical practitioner will have a legal obligation to discuss the woman’s options with her. A three-day waiting period will be enforced. After the 72 hours has elapsed, an abortion pill will be administered to women who choose to continue with the abortion.

After 12 weeks abortion will only be performed if the woman’s life is at risk. Two doctors will be asked to determine if an abortion should be permitted.

After 24 weeks abortion will only be allowed if the foetus will not survive outside the womb. If the amendment isn’t repealed none of this will be allowed. Abortion will only be allowed if the woman’s life is at risk.

 

A post shared by Repeal Project (@repealproject) on

Abortion will not be used as a form of contraceptive.

We can trust women in Ireland to make the right decision. If you vote no, nothing will change and the eighth amendment will continue to ruin existing lives.

Women will still travel abroad and take abortion pills.

This is a once in a lifetime referendum and every vote counts.

Trending

by

The National Youth Council (NYCI) of Ireland has welcomed the unprecedented surge of voter registration ahead of the referendum of May 25. 

Returns received by NYCI indicate that up to 125,000 people were added to the supplementary electoral register between February and the May 8 deadline. 

The figures show a potential increase over of 90 per cent when compared to the voter registration figures for 2015's marriage equality referendum. 

James Doorley, NYCI Deputy Director explained: “For example the numbers registering in Meath (123 per cent), Kerry, (112 per cent), South Dublin (103 per cent) and Westmeath (103 per cent) are up over 100 per cent on 2015. Other counties such as Galway, (97 per cent)  Tipperary, (92 per cent), Kilkenny (86 per cent) are also recording a much increased level of registration.

"Leitrim stands out as a result of an 213% increase in voters included in the supplementary register with 670 additional voters in 2018 compared to 214 in 2015." 

Earlier this year, NYCI expressed concerns that 22 per cent of young people were not registered to vote, however, Mr. Doorley praised the work of a number of youth organisations that helped drive the late surge in registration. 

 “We know that a lot of work was done by a range of organisations in late 2017 and many thousands of eligible voters were added to the electoral register.

"It is really heartening that so many young people responded to the call by NYCI and others and took the opportunity to register at events organised by the USI, ISSU, SpunOut, individual student unions, youth organisations and community groups in recent weeks to ensure they had the right to vote in the upcoming referendum.” 

The organisation is confident that this high level of youth registration will translate into a high level of youth voters and is providing information for young or first-time voters who may have questions following the registration process and in advance of May 25, at www.youth.ie/vote

Trending