HomeTagsPosts tagged with "ethnicity"

ethnicity

by

We all know that girls run the world, because if Beyoncé said it, then by God it must be true.

Online fashion giant PrettyLittleThing have been doing their best to promote female empowerment and body positivity, and now they've majorly stepped up their inclusion game.

The brand have launched #everyBODYinPLT, a campaign to involve absolutely everyone in their clothing lines in honour of International Women's Day.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by PrettyLittleThing.com (@prettylittlething) on

The new collection dropped today, and is set to be a sell-out hit; filled with a range of body types, abilities and ethnicities. We heart.

The clothes have got serious girl boss slogans on them, such as "Girl, you got this", "Girl Gang", "GRL PWR" and "Go Girl." All the things we need to hear when we're feelin' down in the dumps, despite our female badass-ery.

Better yet, the company are celebrating womankind by donating all proceeds to WAGGGS, the world's only movement for every girl and any girl. They believe that each of them deserves to be the best they can be.

WAGGGS represent 10 million girls in 150 countries, helping them to develop their leadership skills and empowering them to use their important voice for change in their communities and countries.

We support their ideal that all girls are valued, and have a place in this world.

Lauren Rose, Lauren Mahon, Mari Malek, Yasmin Jay, Giuliana Farfalla, Danielle Candray and Madison Lawson model the garments for the brand's cause, and look absolutely stunning while they're at it.

International Women's Day falls on March 8 every year, and works to promote issues around the globe for women that need progress and change.

Cheers to building up your fellow gal-pals; fly that flag for female friendships and sisterhoods for life.

Check out the #everyBODYinPLT collection online now, and pledge your allegiance to inclusive clothing.

Trending

'Blackfishing' is the bizarre beauty trend that has the internet exploding, and we want to know your feelings on the matter.

In case anyone is confused about the meaning behind the term, 'blackfishing' is relatively new phrase describing people who pretend to have a different ethnicity online, specifically non-Caucasian.

It ahs become increasingly common amongst young white women on Instagram who use certain filters and language to pose as black or Asian, whether for attention or to capitalise, but other internet users deny that there is any racist intentions behind it.

We are SHOOK at this new information; some users online seemingly even use dark filters, are deliberately ambiguous about their face, wear make-up much darker than their natural complexion and use false or altered hair to appear flawlessly black or Asian.

A young woman named Odinaka even created a Twitter account (which was later suspended) dedicated to outing any reported cases of evident 'blackfishing' from white women.

"I created the account because I thought that there was really an alarming amount of white women posing as black women," she told The Cut.

“It’s very annoying to see people who aren’t black get praised…but yet actual black people get called things like hoodrat, ghetto and ratchet,” Odinaka said.

"They’re gaining success by appearing to look like me while I work ten times as hard to get where I really want to be. It’s unfair."

Writer Wanna Thompson spoke to Buzzfeed regarding the alarming trend of 'blackfishing', where she claimed that more responsibility needs to be undertaken when it comes to ethnic transparency:

“It’s clear that a lot of black women are being overlooked for these white women, so that narrative needs to change"

Speaking about the latest infamous incident involving model Emma Hallberg, she said:

"Nobody is saying you can’t get a tan or modify your appearance but she was intentionally ignoring the comments from black women specifically who genuinely wanted an honest dialogue…Her resistance to own up to her ‘blackfishing’ makes me wonder if she truly cares about black voices at all.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by EMMA HALLBERG (@eemmahallberg) on

Swedish Instagram model Hallberg is the latest influencer who has landed in MAJOR trouble after being called out for potential cultural appropriation.

Social media users are now claiming that the 19-year-old influencer has been "pretending to be black" online, but she is adamantly denying these accusations.

According to Hallberg, everyone in her family has naturally curly hair and tan easily, and she has never fully clarified her race on her account. However, this explanation didn't stop the torrent of hate which was heading her way.

Emma is frequently seen sporting a heavily tanned skin complexion and has even appeared on Instagram pages promoting black models, therefore many social media users assumed she was mixed race.

Understandably, the internet nearly lost it's mind, and a storm of angry responses erupted as more alleged examples of 'blackfishing'  were noted.

Some people deny the trend altogether, believing that models simply use methods of tanning as part of their personal beauty regime:

However, many people online commented on the double standards which are present, emphasising that black women are often criticised for being unprofessional or unkempt for their braided or 'untameable' hair.

Some have even sent home from school for their appearance, yet some (apparently Caucasian) influencers are complimented on their aesthetic.

Many of the accused responded with statements reiterating that they were never trying to appear as another race in the first place, the usual responses were regarding make-up preferences, tanning and hair types such as cornrows and perms.

Supposed Asian 'blackfishers' have also been revealed online, with people changing the shape of their face to appear as another ethnicity:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by CANCELLED CONTENT  (@cancelledcontent) on

There is much division surrounding the intentions behind these social media influencers; some deny that celebrities such as Kim Kardashian mean any harm when they adopt typically 'black' styles such as braids or dreadlocks.

The prominent issue is that Caucasian people who adopt these racial beauty styles are possibly capitalising on them, while still having white privilege.

Others defend those online for their beauty habits, stating that they have never been pretending to change skin tone, only adopting new trends or even just complimenting other cultures.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

Whether you believe that the contentious trend is authentic or not, this strange controversy is causing an absolute frenzy on social media.

What do you think, are these influencers crossing a line or innocently embracing other styles of beauty?

Jesus take the wheel, this is too much.

Feature image: Instagram/@eemmahallberg

Trending

The Victoria's Secret fashion show took place last weekend, and the controversy surrounding the event has been mounting ever since, despite the fact that it hasn't even been aired yet.

Ed Razek, chief marketing officer of L Brands (VS's parent company) threw caution (and tact) to the wind in his exclusive Vogue interview about the fashion show, which first began in 1995.

The public were less than impressed, to say the least, about his statements regarding transgender models in his 'fantasy' show, as well as his attitude towards Rihanna's ground-breaking Savage x Fenty lingerie show.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by SAVAGE X FENTY BY RIHANNA (@savagexfenty) on

Razek was quizzed about the lack of diversity in his own show, which features predominantly skinny, cisgender white models, and had more than a few things to say on the matter:

"Do I think about diversity? Yes. Does the brand think about diversity? Yes. Do we offer larger sizes? Yes….Shouldn’t you have transsexuals in the show? No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy."

As you can imagine, this caused major drama, as it appears to imply that transgender models are not part of the 'fantasy' world of Victoria's Secret.

Razek later issued an apology regarding his comments about transgender models, which wasn't received well:

His outspoken opinions on the 'fantasy' which excluded transgender models were not the only bone of contention. Razek also shared his own thoughts on Rihanna's phenomenally successful show:

"It’s a 42-minute entertainment special. That’s what it is. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and any other fashion brand in the world would take it in a minute, including the competitors that are carping at us."

"They carp at us because we’re the leader. …We’re their first love. And Victoria’s Secret has been women’s first love from the beginning."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by @theluxuryunderworld on

"Everybody keeps talking about Rihanna’s show. If we had done Rihanna’s show, we would be accused of pandering without question."

Blogger and influencer Louise O'Reilly (@StyleMeCurvy) spoke out about the contentious chief marketing director in a tweet, which Bad Gal Riri LIKED.  The shade.

Her show featured a huge range of models ranging in size and ethnicity, as well as ability. Pregnant model and long-time Fenty ambassador Slick Woods walked the show while nine months pregnant.

Rihanna has yet to officially comment on the Victoria's Secret fashion show, but we highly doubt she'd be impressed by the now-infamous Vogue interview.

To think, it was only back in 2012 that Rihanna performed at the fashion show herself… how time flies.

2018 is a whole other fashion show ball game it seems.

Feature image: Syracuse.com

Trending
Well hello there!
Help us help you by allowing us and our partners to remember your device in cookies to serve you personalized content and ads.

We're on a mission to help our mums and their families thrive by informing, connecting and entertaining.

Join us in our mission by consenting to the use of cookies and IP address recognition by us and our partners to serve you content (including ads) best suited to your interests, both here and around the web.

We promise never to share any other information that may be deemed personal unless you explicitly tell us it's ok.

If you want more info, see our privacy policy.