HomeTagsPosts tagged with "Counselling"

Counselling

Nearly two-in-five third-level students are experiencing serious levels of anxiety and depression as a result of stress, a new survey has revealed.

The newly published 'Report on Student Mental Health in Third-Level Education' was compiled by the Union of Students in Ireland (USI), with the support of the HSE Mental Health and the National Office for Suicide Prevention.

Almost one-third of students have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder, with the results painting a worrying picture of the extent of pressures and struggles on the shoulders of Irish students.

The statistics examined the occurrence of mental health distress and ill health among third-level students and the availability and use of mental health support service for young people.

Multiple factors influence depression and anxiety, and women were found to be more likely to suffer anxiety than men. Non-binary students had the highest levels of severe anxiety.

The survey, which was conducted in 2018, was open to students in every college, North and in the Republic, and most of the respondents were undergraduates aged between 18 and 24-years-old.

74 percent of participants were female, and experiences varied largely depending on the type of college attended, the area of study and whether it was inside or outside of Dublin.

One in five of those surveyed identified as LGBTQ+ and just over 1 percent identified as transgender. 38 percent are experiencing extremely severe levels of anxiety, alarmingly.

30 percent of people are reporting suffering from depression and 17 percent are experiencing stress. Almost one-third reported that they had a formal mental health difficulty which was diagnosed.

One of the most distressing points is that 21 percent of participants did not have someone to talk to about personal and emotional difficulties. Free on-campus counselling is imperative for students.

Students were found to use on and off-campus services to aid their mental health, and the student union made 35 percent of students aware of support services. 

The study had a large response of 3,340 students, but the findings may not be a full picture of the student population.

Employment during college was also found to affect students' ability to socialise with their classmates, and those involved in activities outside of coursework had improved mental health.

USI president Lorna Fitzpatrick in Trinity College Dublin said students had provided a vast amount of vital data which would be used to improve mental health services at third level for everyone.

Numerous institutions were found to be problematic in terms of the quality of care offered to students, and a quality assurance tool must be made to ensure consistency between institutions.

Transitioning from secondary school to college is a huge step for all students, and comes at a time when they are most at risk of developing mental health difficulties.

Trending

Chronic insomnia is a condition that affects millions of people all over the world, where individuals find it difficult or impossible to sleep.

The NHS Inform defines insomnia as a challenge to stay asleep “for long enough to feel refreshed the next morning." While it's treatable and can be targeted in a variety of ways, it can be hugely debilitating for those who suffer with it.

Changing your sleep habits, diagnosing underlying issues like mental or physical health condition or using over-the-counter sleeping medication can combat insomnia, but therapy can also help, according to a new study.

A recent study published in the British Journal of General Practice has found that therapy may actually be the best choice of treatment.

Researchers at Queen's University Ontario, Canada, found that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) helps to fight chronic insomnia successfully, despite the fact that it's often used to combat mental health problems like anxiety and depression.

CBT can apparently be used to change the way your mind thinks about sleep. It's regularly offered through a therapist with "the number of sessions you need depending on the difficulty you need help with.”

The British Association for Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapies describes CBT as therapy which is “based on the theory that thoughts, feelings, and what we do and how our body feels are all connected.”

The Guardian reports that the study was conducted through “four randomised control trials, with between 66 and 201 participants of mixed ages.”

Researchers from the trials found “that participants fell asleep on average nine to 30 minutes sooner after completing a course of CBT for insomnia and experienced a reduction of between 22 and 36 minutes in the amount of time spent awake after going to sleep.”

In the study, data analysts found that those who received CBT treatment for between four to six sessions found improvement with their insomnia and that these improvements “were generally well maintained for 3-12 months post-treatment.”

This was compared to the results of those who received treatment “in which the format or content veered substantially from conventional CBT which were less conclusive.”

With blue light from laptop and phone screens increasingly causing sleep disruption, and considering how hard it is to switch our brains off from the hectic attention-grabbing modern lifestyle, CBT therapy sounds great to us.

Trending

Amy Hart has opened up to Grazia Magazine about committing to therapy after leaving the Love Island villa, and the forgiving nature of women in the villa.

The former BA flight attendant has also commented on certain Islanders in particular, namely Maura Higgins' "ever-changing" definition of girl code and the two sides of Curtis Pritchard.

The blonde beauty quit the show after Curtis ended their 720 hour romance, following his head turning in Casa Amor and his new romance with Maura Higgins. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Amy Hart (@amyhartxo) on

Amy has been open about putting her mental health first, which has earned her fans from all over the world and celebrity support alike.

The former Islander also claims she "cannot fault" ITV for their improved after care, saying: “I’ve got 14 months of therapy guaranteed, but if I need it afterwards I can still have it.

"People have had a lot of bad things to say about them and they might have upped the aftercare, but it’s the same team who’ve worked on the show for five years. I don’t agree with the criticism – they are amazing.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Amy Hart (@amyhartxo) on

The suicides of former Love Island contestants Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis has drawn criticism and increased scrutiny on ITV over the aftercare of the show.

The broadcaster recently announced a more intense duty of care process for participants on the show, including a minimum of eight therapy sessions.

According to Hart, all the contestants were briefed on the pressure of fame they would face when they exit the famous show, saying: “They told us, ‘You might be a star, but you might not’.

“‘Be aware you won’t be able to go back and work at Tesco afterwards because everyone will know who you are – your work life will change’. We were all very aware."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by (@amyhartxo) on

Amy later blocked the words 'fat' and 'ugly' from appearing on her social media feed, but doesn't regret leaving despite the trolls.

She said: “When you’re thinking rationally you’d think this was all so stupid but it’s such a pressurised environment in there.

“Before leaving I just sat there and thought, ‘There are 17 other people in this villa but I am so lonely’. I went to the Beach Hut and just sobbed.”

She's got job opportunities coming out of her ears now, at least, with Loose Women calling her up to be a permanent guest panellist;

Derry Girls’ Nicola Coughlan said that Richard Curtis, creator of Notting Hill, texted her saying, ‘I never believed in the saying it’s better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, until I watched Amy leave Love Island’".

“The king of romantic comedy! I made him believe in love," she adds, saying that she hasn't been disheartened from finding love again. David Walliams even slid into her DMs, which is an achievement.

The forgiving nature of women has also been commented on by fans;

"‘Yes, 100% we shouldn’t have blamed ourselves. But I was willing to hear all of that and work on myself to make it work," she says. "I did feel humiliated."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@amyhartxo) on

Her forgiveness of Curtis has moved on to unconcealed frustration, saying, "We’ve seen two different people in that villa, the Curtis that I knew and the Curtis now. I don’t know which one’s real, because they can’t both be."

Amy has wisely decided not to watch Love Island, but she's aware that Maura and Curtis got together just days after her exit. Maura, she says, definitively does not follow Girl Code;

"The thing with Maura is that she has an ever-changing definition of Girl Code. She constantly moves the goalposts to suit her situation. And then suddenly she decided we were never friends. And I will maintain this forever: we weren’t best friends but we did have a close friendship."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by  (@curtispritchard12) on

When asked if she's have happiness for Curtis if he wins the show, Amy replied;

"If I say no that will be the headline!" she says. "If he’s happy I’m happy. If he’s happy and they win that’s fine. No one will beat Tommy and Molly, though I really want Anna and Jordan to win."

Unfortunately, Anna and Jordan have been in the bottom three multiple times and now Jordan's head is getting turned by India, who is coupled up with Ovie. So that ship has most likely sailed…

Feature image: Instagram/@brett_d_cove

Trending

Hollywood was left somewhat stunned earlier this month when word landed that Chris Pratt and Anna Faris had decided to part ways.

The couple, who married in 2009 and welcomed a baby son in 2012, appeared rock solid, so their decision to separate was met with shock by fans and followers in recent weeks.

"Anna and I are sad to announce we are legally separating. We tried hard for a long time, and we’re really disappointed," the Guardians of the Galaxy star wrote on Facebook.

"Our son has two parents who love him very much and for his sake we want to keep this situation as private as possible moving forward."

"We still have love for each other, will always cherish our time together and continue to have the deepest respect for one another," Chris confirmed in a post which racked up hundreds of thousands of reactions.


However, it looks like the couple aren't quite ready to give up on their nine-year relationship, with a source telling the Mail Online that the pair have decided to seek therapy to work on their issues.

"It’s been very intense, with Anna discussing how she feels isolated with Chris gone so much of the time and her career taking a backseat," the insider explained.

"Chris gets frustrated because Anna is in the industry, too, and knew the commitments involved when she married him.’

Despite the problems born of their hectic, high-profile lifestyle, the couple are reportedly determined to work through the problems together.

And frankly, this news has made our morning. 

Trending

Most people are aware of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy as a common tool for dealing with anxiety and depression.

However, a recent study of 33, 243 patients across 103 IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) services in England found that counselling can be just as effective for patients suffering from depression. 

According to psychologyservice.co.uk, counselling involves supporting the patient in talking about their problems and issues and allowing them to come to their own conclusions about the best way to deal with them.

CBT is described as a more direct approach, it involves the practitioner helping the patient to identify unhelpful thinking patterns and behaviour. The patient often does their own work in between sessions to address their problems in a practical way.

The study, which was published in the journal of BMC Psychiatry, found that patients were attending fewer counselling sessions than CBT sessions, however, it showed that two sessions of counselling had a significantly better outcome than two sessions of CBT.

Counselling is often only recommended for patients when other methods have been tried and failed.

Researchers asserted that “it is apparent from the findings presented here that counselling is not inferior to CBT and there would seem little, if any, rationale for committing public money to fund superiority trials of CBT in the field of depression.”

It seems that talking really can be one of the most effective tools when dealing with personal issues.

Trending