HomeTagsPosts tagged with "strike"

strike

by

Picketing officially began this morning for the nurses' strike, which is only the second time in 100 years that the group have carried out work stoppages.

According to The Journal, three-quarters of Irish people support the nurse's 24-hour strike, which is being carried out over an apparent recruitment and retention issue.

Nurses and midwives across the county will be out on the picket line today, fighting for pay and better working conditions at hospitals and private clinics nationwide.

Nursing unions are seeking pay parity with other health service grades, such as physiotherapists and occupational therapists.

The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO) has announced that talks which were held at the Labour Court on Monday night did not lead to any breakthroughs.

The INMO has over 40,000 members, and announced the strikes earlier in January. Over 90 percent of members which were polled voted in favour of industrial action in a ballot held in November.

According to nurses, increasing their pay is the only way to retain nurses, and this would improve working conditions, as well as the recruitment and retention crisis among members.

The government has expressed it's concern over pay rises for nurses outside of the broader public sector pay agreement reached last year, and has refused to give in to the nurses' demands.

The strikes have gone ahead after the Labour Court claimed it would not intervene in the dispute in a formal way, as the government are anxious that other industries will also request pay rises if the nurses obtain their requested 12 percent rise.

A Claire Byrne LiveTheJournal.ie poll of 1,000 adults by Amárach Research found huge support for the nurses' action, with 74 percent of participants expressing agreement with the 24-hour strike. 

Only 17 percent said no, while 9 percent were unsure.

Members of the public have been requested by the HSE only to attend emergency services in hospitals if it is totally necessary.

Liam Woods, HSE national director of acute operations, commented; “We would appeal that patients would only attend the emergency services if absolutely essential."

In emergencies, there will be an emergency response, and any patients whose appointments or surgeries have been cancelled will achieve priority in the weeks following the strike.

The INMO has also said that further strikes will take place on the February 5 and 7, and then February 12, 13 and 14 if an agreement cannot be reached. 

Feature image: Limerick Leader

Trending

by

An impending strike action from Ryanair is the LAST thing we want to think about as we pack our bags, preparing to run to the beach, but it could become a reality later this month. 

Before you go changing any plans, breathe. There's still time to potentially rearrange a few things and look at getting some potential compensation, should your flight get cancelled.

HolidayGuru.ie have compiled a set of tips to follow, which may be helpful, should you be affected.   

Here's what you need to know: 

Can I claim compensation due to a strike?

This depends on whether the airline is legally obliged to provide compensation if the flight is affected due to reasons beyond their control e.g volcanic eruption, a strike, extreme weather.

Depending on who is striking you may be able to claim up to approximately €530 in compensation from your airline.

  • With Ryanair, you may be eligible to claim monetary compensation if your flight was delayed more than 3 hours on arrival or cancelled within 14 days of departure.

  • They say “If the delay or cancellation was unexpected and therefore outside of our control (extraordinary circumstances) no monetary compensation is due under EU Regulation 261/2004.”

What am I entitled to if my flight is cancelled?

Under EU regulation you are entitled to:

  • A full refund of the cost of the ticket within 7 days (fees may apply)

  • A substitute flight to your destination from another airport (additional travel costs will be covered by the airline)

  • A replacement flight outside the strike duration (usually limited to a 12-month period)

Fill out the Ryanair Claim form

If your flight is cancelled and you have to make temporary arrangements in a different city, make sure that you keep your spending costs low and keep the receipts. You can claim a reimbursement from the airline when you return home.

Ryanair has a claim form which can be found on their “Contact us” page. To claim your expenses, you have to provide the flight number, date of the delay or cancelled flight and proof of your expenses such as photos of receipts, PDFs etc.

What happens if the airline rejects your claim?

  • Use an adjudicator or regulator to take the claim further.

  • Take the claim to court: If the airline still reject your claim or you are unhappy with the outcome of your claim then you can take them to court. The court may refuse claims if they date back more than 6 years in England, Northern Ireland and Wales (five years in Scotland) so be sure to keep this in mind.

  • Your insurer may be able to help. Check the terms and conditions of your insurance policy to see what situations it will cover. You may also receive payment to cover hotel costs or alternative transport you require; the airlines should provide this by law, however, as previously stated.

Trending

If you are heading on your holidays, let's hope it isn't on July 12.

Ryanair cabin crew have signalled that they are joining pilots in their strike action. 

Earlier this week, Ryanair was served a notice of industrial action on behalf of Ryanair pilots by Irish Airline Pilots’ Association (IALPA).

The union revealed that 99 percent of their member supported the ballot calling for the action.

The results of Tuesday's ballot confirmed that a 24-hour strike would take place on Thursday, July 12, at 1 am. 

Cabin crew have now announced they will accompany pilots in their work stoppage if their demands are not met.

The Ryanair staff penned their requirements which covered pay, work rotates, annual leave, pensions and compensation.

Last night it was submitted to management.

The move to create a list of demands was branded "pointless" by Ryanair.

Commenting on the development, union official Oliver Richardson said:

"We are a federation. We don't call strike action… strike action is called by our affiliates.

"As a federation, would we support as best as we could those affiliates in taking that action? Of course, we would."

The airline has stated talks are already underway with unions to negotiate the issues raised.

Fingers and toes crossed it gets sorted!

Trending

Listen up, Ryanair fliers.

Ialpa pilot union members who work for Ryanair are planning to strike for 24 hours next Thursday, 12th July. 

The strike will begin at 1am on the 12th and continue until 1am the next day. 

Ryanair has responded  to this announcement by saying that they are ''disappointed'' in this ''unnecessary'' course of action yet they believes that the majority of Ryanair passengers will be unaffected by this.  

July is a busy summer month for airlines, with huge numbers headed off to sunnier climates for their holidays. 

Understandably, many people who have booked with Ryanair are panicking about the consequences that this may have on their travel plans. 

People are voicing their concerns on Twitter, with one user saying, ''you're basically giving me two days or 48 hours to arrange alternative flights.''

After negotiations with the airline broke down, the Ialpa Union said that a landslide 99% of their members had supported the industrial action in a ballot.

The dispute is over management’s approach to the transferring of pilots between it's African and European bases.

The Irish Airline Pilots’ Association has also released a statement giving notice of the strike.

It states that, ''our member pilots directly employed by Ryanair complain that there is no transparent system for the determination of important matters including voluntary/involuntary base transfer/allocation, command upgrade, allocation of annual leave and promotion.'' 

With the strike action set to take place next week, let's hope that this mess gets sorted before then. 

Otherwise, there's going to be a lot of unhappy Ryanair customers. 

Trending

by

Representatives from Ryanair are set to meet with the IMPACT trade union on Tuesday evening in a last-ditch attempt to put a stop to Wednesday's planned strike action.

According to reports, a spokesperson for IMPACT has said they are open to meeting sooner should Ryanair bosses agree.

The airline has said it will publish contingency plans “to minimise these disruptions” for customers.

A statement from the company said: "We apologise sincerely to our customers for any worry or concern that this threatened action, during Christmas week by a small number of very well paid pilots, may cause them.

"Rest assured that we will do everything we can to minimise disruption for our customers."

The union say they can not call off the strike action until a meeting has been held as they need to explore Ryanair’s offer of recognition and agree on the next phase of dispute resolution.

A source told The Sunday Independent: "There's history between the two organisations. Up until the latest company announcement, it had a very public and vehement attitude it wouldn't talk to unions.

"Essentially, they had a 'not over my dead body' approach to union recognition. Taking what they say – based on trust – is not a sensible thing to do."

Any passengers scheduled to fly with Ryanair on Wednesday, December 20, should visit ryanair.com for updates.

Trending

by

Ryanair staff have planned strike action on December 20.

The budget airline has agreed to meet with pilot's union for the first time ever, but passengers may still face disruption. 

There were mixed reactions from pilots’ groups after Ryanair's recognition of the union. 

Chief executive Michael O’Leary said the airline would reconsider its policy of refusing to recognise labour groups.

Up to 117 members of the Irish Airline Pilots’ Association still plan to strike on Wednesday. 

Ryanair has sought a meeting with the Irish Airline Pilots' Association on that day, according to The Independent. 

'Christmas flights are very important to our customers and we wish to remove any worry or concern that they may be disrupted by pilot industrial action next week,' said Michael O'Leary.

'If the best way to achieve this is to talk to our pilots through a recognised union process, then we are prepared to do so, and we have written today to these unions inviting them to talks to recognise them and calling on them to cancel the threatened industrial action planned for Christmas week.'

'Recognising unions will be a significant change for Ryanair, but we have delivered radical change before.'

Trending

by

Ryanair pilots based in Ireland will be striking on Wednesday of next week, the Guardian reports.

This walkout is expected to affect flights to and from Dublin, Shannon, and Cork.

The strike is being called in order to win collective representation in pay deals, instead of through Ryanair's employee channels.

The airline has said it will 'face down' the strike, in spite of the fact that some 'disruption may occur' as a result.

Ryanair claims that the number of pilots taking action is less than a third of those that they employ in Ireland.

The Irish Air Line Pilots' Association (IALPA) union disagreed, saying that the 117 pilots expected to take part in the strike make up almost 90 percent of the pilots directly employed by Ryanair in Ireland.

The IALPA, which are part of the Republic's second-largest trade union, Impact, also said that most of those 117 pilots are captains, who are needed on every flight.

They say the walkout will either cause major disruption or will greatly cost the airline if they bring in pilots from other European bases.

The situation is not unique to Ireland. Ryanair crew and pilots in Italy are striking on Friday, and in Portugal, pilots voted to strike. Ryanair fought back by telling cabin crew in Italy that if anyone strikes, their whole base will lose rights to transfers or promotions.

A statement by the airline says, "Ryanair will deal with any such disruptions if or when they arise, and we apologise sincerely to customers for any upset or worry this threatened action by less than 28 percent of our Dublin pilots may cause them over the coming days."

They continued. "Like any group of workers, Ryanair’s very well paid pilots are free to join unions, but like every other multinational, Ryanair is also free – under both Irish and EU law – to decline to engage with unions."

Ryanair has told their pilots that if they take action they will be in breach of their agreements, which means they will lose benefits such as guarantees over rosters and pay, as well as promotion opportunities. The airline says they offered 20 percent pay deals to their pilots.

Impact stated that the walkout is 'solely about winning independent representation for pilots in the company', as Ryanair is the only Irish-based airline that does not recognise the unions.

Union official Ashley Connolly said, "Management’s failed negotiating model has let down shareholders and tens of thousands of passengers whose flights were cancelled this year because company-controlled industrial relations proved incapable of recruiting and retaining enough pilots."

The union says that more strikes could follow.

Trending

by

Update – Latest statement from Ryanair:

“Less than 28% of Ryanair’s Dublin (over 300) pilots have voted in favour of unspecified industrial action.

“Ryanair has received no notification of any industrial action by its Dublin pilots so we suspect this is more PR activity by Aer Lingus pilots group IALPA, to distract from their failure in negotiating a paltry 3% pay increase for Aer Lingus pilots.

Now that Ryanair’s Cork, Shannon and Belfast bases have agreed 20% pay increases we expect the Dublin pilots to follow this trend. However, if Ryanair’s Dublin pilots are misled by some Aer Lingus pilots into industrial action then they will lose their favourable rosters (5on/4off, a double bank holiday every week) and remuneration benefits that are specifically linked by agreement to dealing directly with Ryanair. 

This might be the first time in Irish history that a few Aer Lingus pilots persuade Ryanair pilots earning between €150,000 to €180,000 p.a. to take up industrial action instead of a 20% pay increase when Aer Lingus pilots are only getting 3%.

If any such industrial action occurs Ryanair will still not engage with, or recognise, Aer Lingus pilots or their IALPA union”.

Earlier: 

Ryanair's Dublin-based pilots have voted  to back industrial action in a ballot carried out this afternoon.

The move comes amid a dispute over pay and conditions as well as collective bargaining and negotiating rights.

According to RTÉ, pilots believe that the company's collective bargaining structures weaken the negotiating powers of employees.

It was also reported that pilots at bases in Dublin, London Stansted and Madrid have rejected proposals from management around pay and conditions.

It's understood that Ryanair has ordered an emergency meeting for its Dublin staff at the Swords headquarters.

However, in a statement this evening, the airline said it had not received any notification of industrial action.

It read: “Ryanair has received no notification of any industrial action by its Dublin pilots so we suspect this is more PR activity by Aer Lingus pilots group IALPA, to distract from their failure in negotiating a paltry 3% pay increase for Aer Lingus pilots.”

"Now that Ryanair’s Cork, Shannon and Belfast bases have agreed 20% pay increases we expect the Dublin pilots to follow this trend. However, if Ryanair’s Dublin pilots are misled by some Aer Lingus pilots into industrial action then they will lose their favourable rosters (5on/4off, a double bank holiday every week) and remuneration benefits that are specifically linked by agreement to dealing directly with Ryanair."

"This might be the first time in Irish history that a few Aer Lingus pilots persuade Ryanair pilots earning between €150,000 to €180,000 p.a. to take up industrial action instead of a 20% pay increase when Aer Lingus pilots are only getting 3%."

“If any such industrial action occurs Ryanair will still not engage with, or recognise, Aer Lingus pilots or their IALPA union.”

It is not yet know whether or not upcoming flight schedules will be affected.

Trending

by

Today marked the first of five bouts of industrial action by Irish Rail employees. 

Employees went on strike today, leaving up to 150,000 commuters to find alternative means of transport and completely halting the country's rail travel system. 

According to a statement released by Irish Rail, there are a number of other days on which strike action is planned, so mark those diaries. 

Trains will not operate across Intercity, DART and Commuter routes next Tuesday, November 7. 

The following week, strike action will also occur on a Tuesday, the 14th. 

This date will hit those outside of Dublin who plan to travel up for the Ireland v Denmark World Cup Play-off at Lansdowne Road.

There will be strike action on Thursday November 23, and again on December 8. 

Refunds are available for those who have planned to travel on those days. 

Strikers hope to secure a pay rise with the latest bout of industrial action bringing Ireland's transport services to a standstill. 

Trending

by

Irish Rail customers will need to make alternative travel arrangements tomorrow morning as staff at Iarnród Éireann prepare for the first of five one-day strikes over pay tomorrow.

Some 155,000 people are expected to be affected by the stoppages which include all Dart, Intercity and commuter rail services.

Both management and unions believe industrial action is inevitable, with Dermot O’Leary, General Secretary for the National Bus and Rail Union saying he did not see “any viable alternative.”

The strike is expected to cost the transport company €600,000 in fare revenue and €300,000 in National Transport Authorities penalties.

Staff at Iarnród Éireann have not had a pay rise in almost 10 years and are looking for a “no strings attached” increase of 3.75 per cent per year.

Further strikes are scheduled for November 7, November 14, November 23, and December 8.

Dublin Bus and Bus Éireann will not be accepting Iarnród Éireann tickets during the strike action, though passengers who have pre-booked tickets for today will have the fare automatically refunded to their accounts. 

Trending

by

Three weeks after strike action began, Bus Éireann services are set to return to the roads.

 The Labour Court recommended 200 job cuts, with 120 among drivers.

The court also recommended a cut to earnings over €60,000.

National Bus and Rail Union general secretary Dermot O’Leary told the Labour Court that once a recommendation was granted, the pickets would be lifted, according to The Irish Times.

The NBRU is now considering the 17-page document of recommendations. 

The strike has caused chaos for commuters, particularly in rural areas of the country. 

Trending

by

Bus Éireann services could be back on the roads this weekend. 

The Labour Court said that it will issue a recommendation in the hopes of resolving the ongoing Bus Éireann strike by lunchtime today. 

It is hoped that once this recommendation is heard, the strike will be called off.

National Bus and Rail Union general secretary Dermot O’Leary told the Labour Court that once a recommendation was granted, the pickets would be lifted, according to The Irish Times.

The strike has caused chaos for commuters, particularly in rural areas of the country. 

A ballot between Dublin Bus drivers was taken this week and saw a 78 per cent vote in favour of striking alongside Bus Éireann.

The organisation must give seven days notice of strike action, by which time the Bus Éireann issue may be rectified. 

Trending