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Hashtags which might be promoting eating disorders on Instagram have now been placed on an 'unsearchables' list following an investigation.

It was discovered that users of the photo-sharing network were bypassing the platform's filters, and health warnings have since been added to several spellings or terms which reference eating disorders.

Many of these terms are popular hashtags on Instagram's platform, but if they are on the 'unsearchables' list then zero results will come up.

Since 2012, the site began making some terms unsearchable in an effort to avoid users being able to locate often upsetting graphic images and posts which encouraged the idea that eating disorders were part of a lifestyle rather than a mental disorder.

However, BBC Trending claim that certain terms are still searchable, include ones which promote bulimia, and that Instagram's search bars suggest different terminology and spellings for terms glamorising eating disorders.

The search box offered a shocking 38 alternative spellings in one such instance for a popular term promoting the disorders.

Instagram has now made several alternative terms unsearchable and have added many to the list of terms triggering the health warning. They also have said they will continue to attempt to restrict such content.

A spokesman on their behalf commented that;

"We do not tolerate content that encourages eating disorders and we use powerful tools and technologies – including in-app reporting and machine learning – to help identify and remove it," 

"However, we recognise this is a complex issue and we want people struggling with their mental health to be able to access support on Instagram when and where they need it."

"We, therefore, go beyond simply removing content and hashtags and take a holistic approach by offering people looking at or posting certain content the option to access tips and support, talk to a friend, or reach out directly" to support groups.

Social networks have begun to censor content which could possibly encourage eating disorders, yet many people online discovered a way to navigate around the filters through deliberately misspelled hashtags.

Instagram and most popular sites don't use moderators to proactively search for dangerous content, and relies on users alone to report violations of its rules.

Algorithms fail to detect the difference between positive and harmful content, and then offer advertising and suggested sites which are promoting an unhealthy mental health disorder.

Eating disorder charities are demanding that ocial media networks take more responsibility for policing their content.

Certain sites online and Instagram pages are supportive for survivors of eating disorders, and there is an argument that removing posts could cease discussions surrounding eating disorders, which is important.

The rules of Instagram prohibit posts which promote or glorify eating disorders, but the company has a long way to go to develop its safety policies.

Trending

Whether it's an impromptu sleepover or you've just forgotten to pack a few essentials, there comes a time in every relationship when someone is going to have to borrow an item belonging to their other half.

Deodorant, phone chargers, the new toothbrush in the bathroom press – it's pretty much all up for grabs when you're sharing a room for the night. After all, sharing is caring, right?

Few things are off limits – not even underwear.

According to a new survey conducted by fashion company Style Compare, almost half of all women aged between 18 and 24 like to borrow their partner's underwear from time to time.

In fact, 40 per cent of women admitted they had borrowed their boyfriend's boxers on more than one occasion over the last year.

What's more, 17 per cent of men said they borrowed their girlfriend's underwear  – though we have a sneaky suspicion the actual figure is probably higher.

All in all, results showed that 14 per cent of the 2,000 people survey (both men and women across all age groups) said they had borrowed their partner's underwear at one point or another. 

For us women though, it seems we're drawn to the comfort offered by male under garments, with a spokesperson for Style Compare saying: “Men benefit from designs that put support and comfort first” – which, let's face it, is completely true.

Give us flowy cotton shorts over lace thongs any day of the week.

Oh, and one more thing while we have you! Don't forget that you can catch up on all your favourite shows for free for a month right here, so sign up now!

Trending

Going around without having brushed your teeth is an awful feeling, but is it bad enough to resort to using someone else’s toothbrush – particularly your other half’s as you’ve been kissing them anyway?

Here at SHEmazing we’re kind of split – is it better to use his toothbrush than to not brush at all?

Well, if you’re ever facing this dilemma again, perhaps take a look at what happens when you use someone else’s toothbrush. We trust you to make the right decision (i.e. just use your finger).

Infection
The Chicago Dental Society says that kids who use their siblings’ toothbrushes, are more likely to develop an infection that can lead to holes in their teeth and tooth decay. We imagine it’s the same if you’re using your boyfriend’s toothbrush. Also, apparently one of the most common bacteria’s found on a toothbrush is beta-hemolytic streptococcus, which causes strep throat – and you don’t want that. Mutant strains of streptococcus are known to cause decay aswell. Lovely.

Blood stream diseases
Dentists have warned that since sometimes your gums may bleed while brushing your teeth, sharing a toothbrush can transfer bloodstream diseases such as hepatitis – now THAT is kind of scary.

Trending
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