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The Sisters of Charity order is set to receive a multi-million euro sum in a deal for the religious order to exit the new National Maternity Hospital complex. 

The news was confirmed yesterday, with James Menton, chair of St Vincent's Healthcare Group, telling The Irish Independent that the sale of the site would amount to millions.

Members of the religious order were previously renting the site to the St Vincent's Healthcare Group.

The involvement of the Sisters of Charity in the new National Maternity Hospital was met with a wave of criticism from the public. 

An online petition was created, which has since garnered over 105,000 signatures, against the move. 

National Maternity Hospital board member Mícheál Mac Donncha told The Journal that there was no doubt that the public's opinion influenced the decision for the order to remove themselves from any hospital involvement. 

'I’ve no doubt that their withdrawal was caused by the controversy,' he said. 

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Following nationwide outrage over the decision to give ownership of the new National Maternity Hospital to the Religious Sisters of Charity, the group have given up ownership of St Vincent’s Healthcare Group.

Further to this, they will have no involvement in the maternity hospital on its campus.

According to emerging reports this morning, the healthcare group confirm that the Religious Sisters of Charity have relinquished their share.

Releasing a statement on the matter, St Vincent's Healthcare Group, said: “The nature of the Sisters' involvement in their healthcare operations has altered significantly in recent decades, from predominantly unsalaried healthcare professionals to the situation today where they have no direct involvement in the provision of healthcare."

"Consequently, the Sisters have for many years been engaged in an on-going strategic review of their healthcare facilities, especially SVHG.

"This has involved finding the way forward that best perpetuates the vision and values of Mary Aikenhead, which are dignity, compassion, justice, quality and advocacy.”

"The outcome of the process is that the Religious Sisters of Charity believe the future continued success of SVHG, and perpetuating the vision and values of Mary Aikenhead, can best be ensured by relinquishing their shareholding in SVHG, and transferring ownership of the group to a newly formed company with charitable status to be called "St. Vincent's."

Confirming the news, the Religious Sisters of Charity explained their stance on the matter.

"We believe that the future continued success of SVHG can best be ensured by our transferring ownership of the group to a newly formed company with charitable status to be called 'St Vincent’s'.”

"We are confident that the board, management and staff of SVHG will continue to maintain a steadfast dedication to providing the best possible acute healthcare to patients and their families in line with the values espoused by Mary Aikenhead.”

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The board of the National Maternity Hospital will meet today to discuss the future of the facility. 

Board member Dr Peter Boylan is refusing to step down from his position after he spoke out about concerns about the project's new ownership.

The new hospital is set to be under the 'sole ownership' of the religious order the Sisters of Charity.

Speaking on RTÉ's Morning Ireland recently, Dr Boylan said it would be inappropriate for the €300,000,000 facility to have strong links to the Catholic Church.

The deal in place regarding the new facility was published yesterday. 

'I think it is clear that the new Maternity Hospital negotiated hard that clinical independence would be written in stone but I think fundamentally the issue of ownership hasn’t been addressed,' said Councillor Eilis Ryan of the deal. 

'There are a number of doctors who have said it is really impossible to guarantee clinical independence unless the state has ownership so I think that is still quite worrying.'

A petition has gone viral against the ownership, which has since garnered over 92,000 signatures. 

An RTÉ poll also found that 86 per cent of people do not want the Catholic Church to have any role in maternity services in Ireland.

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A petition against the Sisters of Charity ownership over the new National Maternity Hospital has gathered over 91,000 signatures, and now a new poll has shown that the majority of Irish people are against the move. 

An RTÉ poll found that 86 per cent of people do not want the Catholic Church to have any role in maternity services in Ireland.

The survey was conducted for the Claire Byrne Live programme. 

The results come after protests had been staged outside the Department of Health against the Sisters of Charity involvement and a petition had since gone viral against their role.

'The Sisters of Charity is one of 18 residential institutions that is highlighted by the Ryan report 2009 to have been responsible for child abuse,' reads the petition manifesto.

'They still owe €3 million to the redress scheme for its survivors. The Sisters of Charity, along with three other religious congregations, were responsible for the management of Magdalene Laundries.'

'In 2013 they stated they would not be making ANY contributions to the State redress scheme to the women who had been subject abuse in the Magdalene Laundries.'

Minister for Health Simon Harris has attempted to reassure the public that there will be no Catholic influence on the health care provided to women at the new National Maternity Hospital. 

'The identity and ethos of the current NMH will be retained,' reads a statement from the Department of Health. 

'The new company will have clinical and operational independence in the provision of maternity, gynaecology and neonatal services, without religious, ethnic or other distinction, as well as financial and budgetary independence.'

However, a further poll shows that only 23 per cent of people surveyed believe the Minister's reassurances. 

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A protest is set to take place today against the government plans to hand ownership of the new National Maternity Hospital to the Sisters of Charity.

The demonstration is set to take place outside the Department of Health at Hawkins House in Dublin this lunchtime from 1-2pm.

The protest aims to notify the government of the feelings that Irish citizens have about the decision. 

Councillor Éilish Ryan from the Workers Party said: 'The decision to grant ownership of the National Maternity Hospital makes a mockery of the supposed neutrality of the Citizens’ Assembly.'

'Do any of us really believe that, if and when the 8th amendment of our constitution is repealed, any new legislation for abortion will be implemented fully in a hospital wholly owned by the Catholic Church?'

'Every week another story emerges of the extraordinary harm done to women by the church, with state complicity, in this country.'

'What good is it to agree, finally, to remove archaic, church-written clauses from our constitution, if we hand over women’s healthcare to that same church?' 

There is a petition underway online in an attempt to draw attention to the issue, which has garnered over 50,000 signatures in 24 hours. 

'The church – and any private body – has no place in the provision of healthcare.'

'Maternity care gets to the root of how we value women in this country, and historically has been where women have been worst treated by our state. Its time for us to change that record,' finished Councillor Ryan. 

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There was an air of discontent among the Irish public when it was announced on Tuesday that the new National Maternity Hospital would be given to religious order The Sisters Of Charity, according to The Irish Times.

The move was met with criticism from the public, who took over Twitter to express their opposition to the move.

Now, an online petition has started, in an attempt to draw attention to the issue.

The petition has gained 49,036 signatures in 24 hours, and is now just 64 pledges away from the goal of 50,000. 

'The Sisters of Charity is one of 18 residential institutions that is highlighted by the Ryan report 2009 to have been responsible for child abuse,' reads the petition manifesto.

'They still owe €3 million to the redress scheme for its survivors. The Sisters of Charity, along with three other religious congregations, were responsible for the management of Magdalene Laundries.'

'In 2013 they stated they would not be making ANY contributions to the State redress scheme to the women who had been subject abuse in the Magdalene Laundries.'

'The Department of Health now want to give 'sole' ownership of the new €300 million State-funded National Maternity Hospital. Deny them 'sole' ownership.'

'Demand they formally apologise and pay redress.'

Minister for Health Simon Harris has stood by the decision,tweeting: 'When it comes to our maternity services, I take the views of those responsible for the delivery of infants & the clinical care of women.'

'It is correct that the land on which the new maternity hospital will be built is owned by the St. Vincent’s Healthcare Group and that the Sisters of Charity are a major shareholder in the St. Vincent’s Healthcare Group," reads a Department of Health statement.

'The identity and ethos of the current NMH will be retained.'

'The new company will have clinical and operational independence in the provision of maternity, gynaecology and neonatal services, without religious, ethnic or other distinction, as well as financial and budgetary independence.'

You can take a look at the petition for yourself here

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It was revealed today that ownership of the new €300 million National Maternity Hospital will be given to religious order The Sisters Of Charity, according to The Irish Times.

The order will be awarded responsibility for the new state-funded facility, which will be built near Elm Park in South Dublin.

The Sisters of Charity was one order of many who were ordered by the Ryan commission investigation to pay €5m to the state redress scheme for victims of institutional abuse in the Magdalene Laundries. 

The organisation still owes €3m of the sum, which was agreed upon in 2002. 

In 2013, four religious congregations including The Sisters of Charity, which were associated with Magdalene laundries, announced that they would not be making any further payments redress scheme for women who had been in the laundries, according to The Irish Times.

Irish citizens have taken to Twitter to express their outrage against the order having "sole ownership" of the new maternity hospital. 

"A state-funded hospital to be given to Sisters of Charity. The lack of respect of those who suffered is appalling," said one.

"Sisters of Charity to be 'sole owner' of National Maternity Hospital? What year is this? Separate church & state," said another. 

A statement from the Department of Health says that the hospital will not prescribe to any religious distinction. 

"It is correct that the land on which the new maternity hospital will be built is owned by the St. Vincent’s Healthcare Group and that the Sisters of Charity are a major shareholder in the St. Vincent’s Healthcare Group," reads the statement.

"The identity and ethos of the current NMH will be retained."

"The new company will have clinical and operational independence in the provision of maternity, gynaecology and neonatal services, without religious, ethnic or other distinction, as well as financial and budgetary independence."

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