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Dublin Zoo and SSE Airtricity have announced the chosen name of the adorable baby gorilla, who was born on April 1 at Dublin Zoo.

Thousands of entries were made in the nationwide competition to pick a name for the animal, and the winner was announced as Ina Walsh.

Ina suggested the name Asali, which translates to 'honey' in Swahili, and was declared the recipient of free electricity for a year from SSE Airtricity.

Followers of RTE's The Zoo can tune in this Sunday for the final episode of the series to see baby Asali's birth in Dublin Zoo. The staff at the zoo are over the moon with Asali's progress.

The gorilla is being carefully minded by her parents, and is mixing well with the rest of the gorilla troop. Asali has a charming personality already, developing fast and weighing over four kilos.

Team Leader Helen Clarke Bennett says;

“Asali has had quite the few weeks. She is bright, alert and extremely adventurous. She has come on leaps and bounds over the past few weeks and has even developed a special bond with Kambiri another young female in troop."

Helen added;

"The two spend their days playing together and Asali is learning many important life skills from this friendship. We are looking forward to watching Asali’s development and can’t wait to watch her grow into adulthood.”

Dublin Zoo is currently home to a troop of five western lowland gorillas; Bangui, the dominant male and Asali’s father, and four females; Asali's mother, Kafi, Kambiri, Vana and now the newest baby. 

Aine Plunkett, Head of Marketing for SSE Airtricity said; “We’re delighted with the response we received for the competition and can’t think of a more fitting and beautiful name as Asali."

Western lowland gorillas are the largest of the primates and normally favour quiet, tranquil environments.

The Gorilla Rainforest, their habitat at Dublin Zoo, was strongly influenced by behavioural studies of gorillas in the wild. The environment and design is based around these reports.

High, rocky outcrops and trees give the apes an a great view of the surrounding landscape, and the gorillas are able to forage and move to private resting spaces due to streams and dense vegetation.

We love the new name, welcome to Dublin baby Asali. 

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The terrifying moment a young boy was spotted inside the rhino enclosure at Dublin Zoo has been captured by social media users.

Several images show the boy in the company of an adult male – who significantly is standing outside the fence. And with the same images being shared on Twitter, many observers understandably expressed their concern.

One user who was at the zoo on Saturday said she saw the boy in the enclosure for a 'good 20 minutes'.

Asking SHEmazing not be named but confirming the incident with us, she had previously told the Irish Daily Mail: "The child didn’t look scared and nobody really passed any heed on what he was doing.

"The child stood there for a good while and the man kept letting go of his hand and telling him to move further back to pose for a picture."

Rathmines-based architect Ciarán Ferrie also spotted the ordeal, sharing two photos via his Twitter account. 

A spokesperson for the zoo said over the weekend that the "matter is being taken care of internally".

Dublin Zoo keeps several white rhinos as part of its African Plains attraction.

When the Plains initially opened in 2001, the animals – including zebra, ostriches, and giraffe – mingled together. However, after a female rhino charged at and killed a zebra in 2009, the rhinos were segregated into their own space.

At the time, a zoo official stated that the incident was an accident, but added that "there are no guarantees when you're dealing with wild animals".

Three years ago also at Dublin, a two-year-old girl was mauled by a tapir during a supervised visit to the animal’s enclosure. She was left with deep cuts on her arm and stomach and underwent surgery in Temple Street Children’s Hospital.

A decade ago, a 16-year-old girl scaled a two-metre fence to reach the Siberian tiger enclosure. She subsequently received significant injuries to her limb.

A Cincinnati Zoo in June, a three-year-old boy fell into the gorilla enclosure – resulting in the shooting dead of the ape. The boy was unharmed.

In Morocco last month, an eight-year-old girl died after she was accidently struck by a rock thrown by an elephant at Rabat Zoo.

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Weighing just 4lbs and following a nine-month long pregnancy, a tiny new arrival came into this world a few days ago. 

Surrounded by a loving family, the baby is especially adored by Lena, the wholly-besotted new mother.

Indeed, the little one hasn't left her side yet – preferring to feed and sleep throughout the day while snuggled closely into her chest. 

The only difference between this particular new arrival and countless others, is that this baby is a critically endangered western lowland gorilla, of which there are around 550 living in zoos around the world.

However, in many other ways there are more similarities than there are differences. 

The baby gorilla has yet to be named – who was born in Dublin Zoo – and its gender remains a mystery as keepers have been unable to catch glimpse of him or her for very long. 

The little one is in good hands, however – this is Lena's seventh baby and she is a celebrated excellent and experienced mother. 

Sadly, the baby's father Harry passed away in May at the age of 29 after suffering from a stroke.

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There was an outpouring of grief late last month when news emerged that Harry, Dublin Zoo's resident male silverback gorilla, had died.

At the time of his passing his exact cause of death was unknown. However, a post-mortem has now been carried out and it appears that the great ape died from a stroke.

"The team at Dublin Zoo would like to thank everyone for their best wishes during the sad time since Harry, our silverback gorilla, died," a statement from the organisation read this evening. 

"Harry showed signs of being unwell on Wednesday 25th May. Despite the best of care from our animal care and veterinary teams, Harry passed away on Sunday morning 29th May.

"The post mortem has shown that Harry suffered a stroke."

Harry was 29 years old at the time of his death and during his time in Ireland he fathered six offspring; two females and four males.

The statement added that the rest of the troop "are doing well and have been calm since his passing".

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The country was in shock yesterday when Dublin Zoo took to Facebook with some tragic news.

Their beloved silverback male gorilla, Harry, had died aged just 29.

Zoo workers and visitors have been revealing their memories of the ape in the aftermath – and now one Dublin photographer has also shared one remarkably touching moment.

Anthony Lynch posted on his Facebook page a snap which seems to show a large gorilla head 'kissing' the famed Phoenix Park obelisk.

In a message with has now garnered some 25,000 reactions, the photographer wrote: "I was sitting in my car waiting for the sun to set behind the Phoenix monument and looking through fb when I seen that Harry the gorilla had died after years in Dublin Zoo which I happened to be outside."

"Maybe I'm staring at the sun too long but does anyone else see a gorilla kissing goodbye to the phoenix park monument?"

Many fans were in agreement – with the incredible snap currently doing the rounds on social media.

The exact cause of Harry's death is still unknown, but Dublin Zoo says it is carrying out a postmortem shortly.

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