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teens

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Unlike today's teens, who look like they have just stepped down from the Inglot MUA's chair, we are from the era of foundation covered lips and self applied French manicures.

Perhaps it's down to the mass of YouTube tutorials and Instagram inspiration that wasn't available to us back in the day, but today's teens fail to fall into the (foundation coated) makeup traps we did in secondary school. 

Here are a few of the top nostalgic makeup techniques we used back in the day: 

1. Foundation lips

Foundation coated lips were the basis of an excellent makeup look in secondary school.

While voluptuous, lined and highlighted lips may be all the rage now, when we were 15, the look du jour was to pretend you didn't have any lips at all. 

 

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2. Foundation types

If it wasn't Dream Matte Mousse or pan stick, we didn't want it. 

There was something about the mousses' air whipped formula that we found perfect for school, and the shiny, tanned, glamorous sheen awarded to our visages by pan stick was too good for us to resist. 

The problem was the liberal nature in which we applied these products, rather than the products themselves. Less is more wasn't our mantra back in the day. 

 

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3. Spidery lashes

Again with the opposition to less is more, layering mascara onto our lashes until they resembled a terrifying mass of brambles was the way to go.

Bonus points is the mascara started flaking off and left gorge little black specks under your eyes. 

Fake eyelashes from the €2 Shop were also an option for discos, which were to be bought alongside your tube of glowsticks and disposable camera. 

 

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4. Brushes? What brushes? 

If an eye shadow palette came with a little sponge applicator, that was what was used for liberally layering the pastel shades.

The term brush roll sounded more like a baking term to us in our teens. 

Applying foundation with your fingers was also an acceptable activity, whereas todays' teens wouldn't be caught dead without their beauty blender. 

5. Orange foundation 

There is something about being uber-tanned that seems like an absolute accolade when you are in your teenage years. 

But like, who could be arsed tanning your whole body or splashing the cash for spray tans? 

The natural remedy to our pasty skin was layers on tan in the spots of skin people could see, like our necks and forearms, and a nice coating of 'deep tan' foundation on our faces. 

 

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6. Foundation mask

Speaking of the aforementioned foundation, it was left in a flat, featureless mask on our faces, with the likes of highligher and contouring distant gifts from the future which had yet to be awarded to us via Kim Kardashian (who wasn't even a thing at this stage of our lives). 

You may have occasionally opted for two delightful stripes of bronzer along your cheekbones or a splash of bright pink blush, but telling someone to get their 'highlight on fleek' back in 2008 would have been a completely foreign concept. 

 

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7. Raccoon eyes

Whether you were simply experimenting with a new look or had a deep, passionate relationship with The Pretty Reckless or Panic! at the Disco, raccoon eyeliner was the territory of emo kids at secondary schools the country over. 

The look was accompanied by a matte black a swathe of eye shadow across the upper lid, symbolic of the deep and dark nature of the tormented soul of the wearer. 

8. A severe lack of blending

Blending our makeup was something that we never did as teens. 

After all, what was the point of wearing makeup if it didn't look like you were wearing makeup? 

From that attractive orange jaw line to eye shadow that went all the way up to your brows, blending was far from the essential technique that it is seen as by the kids these days. 

They're the teen romance films we are all (secretly) obsessed with.

Whether or not you admit to loving this genre, there's good news.

Netflix has confirmed there will be a sequel to the To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before and we CAN'T WAIT.

If you haven't seen the first movie – GO and watch it.

But it's based off an award-winning novel written by Jenny Han and follows actress Lana Condor as a secondary student Lara Jean.

Instead of confronting the lads she likes, Lara writes love letters to the boys she's been eyeing up and hides them away in a teal box in her wardrobe.

Cue the little brat of a sister snooping in her room and sending the private confessions to the boys they're addressed to.

A whole lot of drama occurs which leads to an arrangement being made with a boy called Peter.

Peter and Lara agree to pretend to be each other's partners.

I am sure you can guess what happens from here, but the predictable plot still gets us every time.

The second instalment of the books is titled P.S. I Still Love You, which is already giving us feels.

WE CAN'T WAIT.

Two separate shooting incidents occurred in Dublin last night, with the victims of both incidents aged in their teens.

A man in his late teens was found with apparent gunshot injuries to the head in Clondalkin at around 11pm last night.

He was discovered in the front garden of a house at Shancastle Park Clondalkin Dublin 22.

He was taken to Connolly Hospital where he is in a serious condition.

A Garda investigation is under way.

Gardaí are appealing for witnesses or anyone with information to contact them at Ronanstown Garda Station on 01 666 7700.

In an unrelated incident, a second man in his late teens received a gunshot wound to the abdomen in Ballymun, Dublin.

The injuries occurred after shots were fired into a house  at Barnwell Drive Ballymun, Dublin 11 in the early hours of this morning, around 2.25am.

The man has been taken to The Mater Hospital.

Anyone with information should contact Ballymun Garda Station on 01 666 4400.

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Earlier this month actress Jennifer Aniston led an impressive conversation about the position of women in society as she criticised the press for their treatment of female celebrities and now the star has given one of her most powerful interviews yet to a group of teenagers at an Italian film festival.

During a Question and Answer session with a gathering of children and teens at Giffoni Film Festival, Jen got real on the topic of self doubt.

When one youth asked her if she has ever woken up in the morning feeling unsure of her identity, Jen openly replied: "There are not enough fingers and toes in this entire room to count how many times that moment has happened to me."

"We're all human beings at the end of the day, whether we're a waitress or a baker or a student or whatever we are, at the end of the day you kind of can hit walls and think I can't go any farther. Or this is too much.”

“My heart can't take it or the pain is too great, or am I good enough? Will I survive?"

“And you just have to sort of somehow miraculously overcome. You just go, ‘I can't, yes I can, yes you can.'"

Upon receiving a round of applause for her answer, the Friends star – who was presented with a Lifetime Achievement award at the festival – looked visibly moved as she became tearful and dabbed her eye with a tissue.

She then continued: "And also know that your actors, your idols, your icons, whatever you call them, have all had that experience or that moment in their lives many, many times.”

“There's nothing that separates us from you, because we all started at the same place."

"We all came out of nowhere. We were all born little innocent empty vessels. Don't punish yourself if you feel that. Go talk to people and seek help and always find something to inspire you."

We love hearing Jennifer speak in such a raw way about this important topic and hope she continues to inspire in the future.

Feat image: Getty

Centre image: Getty